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Baguette Nightmare

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I understand that one of the most difficult breads are french baguettes, well Its a matter of honor to do a "perfect baguette".
I had the worst flour that you can imagine, Why? Because in my country theres only flours with chlorine , bromate and other stuff, thats why I dont have flavor in my baguettes, I used sponge, poolish, pre-fermented, you name it, just 2% of salt in my recipes, High humidity thats why I dont have a crust, when I proofed the baguette overnight, the baguette came out of the oven with a crust and when cooling down, the same absorb all the humidity and turned soft, so I dont care about that much, but the flavor, its insipid bread all the time. Any help, ideas, prayer will be very very apreciate.
Isa
post #2 of 18
It is amazing, is it not that 4 simple ingredients - flour, water, salt and yeast can, when treated properly produce such a heavenly product.

The trick then becomes to extract as much flavor and sweetness from the flour as possible. This is done in part with long, slow, cool (refrigerator) ferments.

Why don't you post the recipe so we can see?

BTW, where's home for you?

Jock
post #3 of 18
Try cooling your breads in the oven for the first 10 minutes. Turn the oven off and open the door half way. This should help the remaining internal moisture to escape in a dry environment. Often it is this last bit of moisture escaping that causes a once crisopy crust to soften as the bread cools. As to the external moisture, well I'm afraid theirs not much you can do :(
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks Kyle, Jock, the recipe: 3 1/2 wheat flour, 2pounds H2O, 1oz salt, 1/2 oz instant yeast. My home is Puerto Rico. The problem with turning off my oven is that I need the oven almost all day on, because Im producing others products.
But I have one day that I can test that way.
BTW did you were member of the BBGA?
Thanks
post #5 of 18
I am a card carrying member of the BBGA :)
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
:) :) :) :) :) :)
post #7 of 18

Baguettes

I am an amateur bread maker - trying to improve my baguettes. I just read a post about the window pane test that asnwered some questions but I have a couple more.

One is that I get a wonderful golden brown crust on the bottom of my baguettes, which are baking on a stone, but the tops are kinda of a muddy brown, trending towards blackish highlights. I don't know what to change.

Two, and quite possibly related, my crusts seem a little too thick. Is this a function of over baking, or some other aspect of the dough itself?

Thanks for any suggestions.
post #8 of 18
OK, I gotta ask, what is BBGA?

Chef Isa, you may want to increase the water in your recipe. You have about 57% hydration and you could up it to 62% or more to give the yeast a bit more room to do it's work.

Winona, many supermarket flours contain malt which amongst other things, helps to promote browning. Other flours don't (If I remeber, KA flour does not I think) and that might be a problem for you. Also, in the fermenting process natural sugars are developed which add flavor and color. You may want to look at the fermenting times and temperatures you are using.

Do you check for doneness by taking the bread's temperature? About 200 degrees internal temperature is enough. Guestimating or baking for the time prescribed by the recipe with an oven that might be out of calibtration will give you trouble - especially with a thin bread like a baguette.

Jock
post #9 of 18
Jock,

I do use a thermometer. Are you saying that the presence of malt could cause the "discoloration"? When you say fermenting time you mean the time that the dough is rising? I aim for two fours, trying to estimate when the volume has doubled - that always seems a bit iffy. How do you gauge when your dough has doubled in volume?

Winona

P.S. Thanks for asking about BBGA.
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
The BBGA is the Bakers Bread Guild of America, I learned a lot with this people.
I had a crust finally turning off the oven.
I will increase the hidratation on the recipe.
Btw, I score my baguettes and never open like I wanted, any ideas????
The opening is small, I practice everytime without success.
Thanks,
Isa
post #11 of 18
Isa, do you use steam or spritz the oven with water when you first put the bread in the oven? Steaming for the first few minutes will give "oven lift" which might improve the appearance of the slashes in your bread.

Winona, malt promotes browning on the crust and helps to give it a nice color as does the sugar production from a long rise. I will leave my dough in the refrigerator overnight to let the yeast do its thing and extract all the flavor it can from the flour.

Jock
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Ups, I post a reply and did not show, well....Thanks Jock, yes, I put some steam in the oven, tomorrow I will test other methos and let you know my results. Thanks always.
Isa
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Ok, I did it, after retarding the dough in bulk 2 hours in he proofer, turning after one hour, I created the most beautifull and flavoring baguette, just some patience and love. I was working in a very hot enviroment and high humidity.
I did it.
je je
post #14 of 18
Well Done :bounce: :bounce: :bounce:

Jock
post #15 of 18
Hi Chef Isa!

In the bakery where I worked we sprayed our baguettes three times with water during the baking process. It produced a crust so crispy that it cut the roof of my mouth when I bit into it once! We used convection ovens and at about the last fifteen minutes of baking we sprayed them with water at five minute intervals. They were very crusty when they came out and retained their crust throughout the day. For flour we used High Gluten and added a little Malt powder for flavor.Good luck!



Suzanne
post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks Cookie Lady, we used to have the bread with a crispy crust here in Puerto Rico, but now people like soft bread, I dont know, maybe the easy way..... But I have a goal here and Im working with that!!!!!!
post #17 of 18
DEAR CHEF ISA,
I ALWAYS BELIEVE THAT EVEN FROM THE WORST FLOUR ONE CAN CREATE THE BEST OF THE BAGUETTE IF U HAVE A PROPER KNOWLEDGE OF BREADS.
FIRST OF ALL KNOW BOUT A SOUR DOUGH STARTER GIVE LET UR BAGUETTE BE CLASS APART BY CALLING IT A SOURDOUGH BAGUETTE.
MAKE THE DOUGH WITH LITTLE YEAST SOURDOUGH STARTER SALT,CHILLED WATER ,BREAD IMPROVER AND GLUTEN IF THE FLOUR IS OF INFERIOUR QUALITY.MAKE A LOOSE DOUGH APPROX RATIO 60% WATER FOR EVERY KG OOF FLOUR.
SHAPE IT LET IT REST IN THE BENETTON FOR OVER NIGHT INSIDE A WALKIN REFER TO LET ACID REACT AND FOR FLAVOUR DEVELOPMENT.
PROOF IT OUT SIDE TILL THE LAST STAGE
BAKED IT IN A HOT OVEN 200*C FOR 25 MINUTES.GIVE GASHES WITH A BLADE NOT A KNIFE SPRAY WATER AFTER A PERIOD OF 30 SECOND FOR STEAM.ANY OTHER QUERIES DO LET ME KNOW.
RAJEEV KRISHNAN(INDIA) :chef:
post #18 of 18
Oops I Mean Spray Water After Evert 3o Sec Tree Times
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