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How can I make sauces for plating effects?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
How can I make sauces for plating effects? (The ones in the squeezable bottles that you squirt on to make it fancy)

What ingredients are commonly used?
post #2 of 17
Thread Starter 
bump...... :bounce:
post #3 of 17
a sauce is part of a dish. It's not there for bobby flay's amusement. What is your dish?
post #4 of 17
Boil 1qt water. Boil 1qt milk.

Add cornstarch slurry to both in equal amounts to ensure consistency.

Add caramel color to water.
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
I am making marinated flank steak.
post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
WHere do I get caramel color?
post #7 of 17
Caramel color is burnt sugar.
post #8 of 17
Hah, so true... Gotta love the 5 squeeze bottle garnishes per dish...
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
What are some of the 5 squeeze bottle garnishes and how do I make them?
post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 
Are those called Coulis? Do they have any other names?
:D
post #11 of 17
Not sure what Bobby Flay uses... Probably 3 different types of chili oils, some pureed sauces, etc... BTW, I don't like his style one bit so I wouldn't even try guessing what he's using.
post #12 of 17

bright colors

If you are interested in show, go for bright colors! The food processor is you best bet. AND this is a great chance to utilize your creativity! If you are saucing a desert, puree bright fruit, particularly reds, blues, and yellows. If you want to enhance beef, find out what spices create cool colors like tumeric and learn how to encorporate them.... It all depends on what part of the process you want the "sauce" to be a part of.
Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death! Auntie Mame
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Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death! Auntie Mame
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post #13 of 17
What is in the marinade? How are you planning on presenting the Flank Steak (as a steak or in slices)? I have never had a dish where the "sauce" was just for looks. It needs to compliment what you are serving and tie together flavors.
Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
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Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
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post #14 of 17
Abe, if you are cooking in a restaurant, move past the 5 squeeze bottle garnish. It's done. Your guests will respond better to artistic compostion rather than artistic decoration. You want to experiment with cool garnishes? Learn gastriques and get some brushes. Make brush strokes that compliment the dish. Run big stokes near the rims, or on them. (..I know you guys want to crucify me for saying that) Plum Gastrique would compliment your flank steak well, as I assume there will be some form of red wine and veal demi reduction as the sauce.
post #15 of 17
Really basic drizzle sauces for plating...

Balsamic syrup. Just reduce the vinegar, add a little honey if you're lazy and don't want to wait. (It also gets a little more kick for your product yield, but is a lesser product.)

Super dense veal reduction. Incorporate a little reduced blood to give it a nice color.

Basil oil/cilantro oil. Just puree fresh herb with oil, strain.

But as has been stated, be reserved about plating with this stuff. People may enjoy being served a Jackson Pollock dinner entree, but the satisfaction rarely lasts. Good composition is way, way better. People aren't interested in the seven cents worth of curried mango coulis on their plate, they are more interested in the nine dollar piece of tuna loin. Focus on that, not on the distraction value of your sauces.
post #16 of 17
Go buy a bottle of dark molasses drizzle with a spoon onto white plate. Practice makes perfect.
"Today, I've personalized each of your meals. For example, Amy, you're cute. So I've baked you a pony."
Bender Futurama
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"Today, I've personalized each of your meals. For example, Amy, you're cute. So I've baked you a pony."
Bender Futurama
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post #17 of 17
I think a roasted red pepper puree may come in handy as well. It is very bright. I also agree about the infused oils: chive oil, chile oil, cilantro, etc.. very pretty, especially on top of tomato based soups!

I think a good "squeeze bottle" to have for steak is perhaps a horseradish, sour cream mixture blended with chives. It yields a light green color. Then again, I think it may look tacky coming out of a squeeze bottle, unless it's thinned out a bit.

edit: Perhaps some sort of black pepper sauce would be good. I've never attempted. Does anyone have any ideas for this? I'm a spice fiend.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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