or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What is a Coulis?

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 
What is a Coulis? How is it traditionally made? Is it mostly for desert? What are some variations you can do for non desert foods?
post #2 of 32
It's a puree of either fruit or vegetable. Usually colorful in appearance and often used as a sauce with other base sauces to create color and texture contrasts.
post #3 of 32
This definition comes from "The Chef's Companion" by Elizabeth Reily.

Coulis (french) "An old culinary term of some confusion; originally the strained juices from cooked meat, then a puree of chickne, game, or fish; now it usually means a bisque or thick sauce or puree, such as tomato."

Today it often refers to a thin puree (or thick sauce) of either vegetables or fruit.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #4 of 32
Abe, I've been watching your questions in the last few threads; You need a to own a **** good cook book. Even a few old issues of Bon Appetit; Food & Wine or Gourmet Magazine.
post #5 of 32
NowIamone, we welcome all questions here. Many of us are more than willing to share our experience and knowledge to help others, both professional and homecooks.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #6 of 32
NowIamone, I don't think your last reply was constructive at all. ChefTalk tries to provide a safe and comfortable atmosphere where people who have questions can ask now matter how simple or complex.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #7 of 32
Thread Starter 
I own many cook books thank you. None of them mention Coulis or how to make it, hense my post here.
post #8 of 32
Whoa.............. down boys! Actualy meant that to help, it must have read a little sarcastic to all of you! That word that came out in astericks was the spelling equal of dam; and there are all kinds of cook books, but there are really darn good ones also that cover a multitude of excerises. Same with magazines, Food & Wine, etc. is a better recipe, cooking resource than Woman's Day or Good Housekeeping.
post #9 of 32
No problem, we just like to keep a friendly atmosphere around here and we tend to err on the cautious side. Thanks for posting a reply and appreciate the help given.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #10 of 32
To give you some examples that I have used in my restaurant, we had a duck breast for a while served with an apricot coulis, and we have a pesto crusted salmon with a roasted yellow pepper coulis. Both coulis were very tasty and light on the pallet.
"Whatever you are, be a good one."
-Abraham Lincoln-

"The weak ones fall, the strong carry on."
-Tom Petty-
Reply
"Whatever you are, be a good one."
-Abraham Lincoln-

"The weak ones fall, the strong carry on."
-Tom Petty-
Reply
post #11 of 32
Thread Starter 
You just mix apricot and yellow pepper with cream?
post #12 of 32
Apricots, asparagus, tomato, beets, whatever you want to use. Try this, and this is good mental application for future use. Cook, puree, strain, reheat, thicken if needed, chill. Use your cooking liquid as thinner, strain twice, always reduce to thicken if time allows. finished product should be velvety, bold in flavor, and preferably not soupy. But honestly, and probably some of you will disagree, it should be absolutely free of sediment.
post #13 of 32
Chefrjl, you need to be careful about reducing to thicken, especially after adding certain veggies, as reducing can dull the color. Example, I would never continue to reduce an asparagus coulis after blending as the color can very easily go from vibrant green to olive drab.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #14 of 32
Use one capsule of ground up ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and it will perserve the color of green vegetables like asparagus, spinach, basil pesto, etc. ;)
Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
Reply
Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
Reply
post #15 of 32
Pgram. I was getting ready to say the same thing when I read your post. my tragic downfall, I assume people already know some of these things. Sorry ya'll, i forgot to add it before.
post #16 of 32
Cheater!

Blanch it, robot coupe it, push it through a mesh strainer, season, chicken stock to consistency. (This is how I do it, anyway.) If it's too thin, blanch more. (Too thin is rarely a problem, since you'd have to be adding too much liquid.)

Fruit coulis I'll play around with liquids - rice wine for mango, strawberry - verjus for raspberry, tomato, kiwi... etc.
post #17 of 32
If I remember correctly, the apricot coulis didn't have cream in it. The pepper coulis does have cream and several other ingredients. If you'd like, I can find the recipes and send them to you...
"Whatever you are, be a good one."
-Abraham Lincoln-

"The weak ones fall, the strong carry on."
-Tom Petty-
Reply
"Whatever you are, be a good one."
-Abraham Lincoln-

"The weak ones fall, the strong carry on."
-Tom Petty-
Reply
post #18 of 32
I have a good one.
Roasted corn and ginger coulis. Great with scallops or shrimp. :chef:
"Today, I've personalized each of your meals. For example, Amy, you're cute. So I've baked you a pony."
Bender Futurama
Reply
"Today, I've personalized each of your meals. For example, Amy, you're cute. So I've baked you a pony."
Bender Futurama
Reply
post #19 of 32
One of my favorite sauces is "Corn Cream". Juice a couple ears of corn, separating pulp and juice. Slowly heat the corn juice to a boil. It will thicken considerably. Thin with some chicken stock to consistency, season with salt and pepper, and finish with a little butter. During season this sauce is plenty sweet, out of season I often add (if even using it out of season) just a hint of honey to help the sweetness. Drizzled around the plate, along with some cilantro oil and chili oil really helps play up a Southwestern theme.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #20 of 32

 A coulis to me is simply a puree that has been forced through a fine sieve and set aside to be used as a base for what ever you may have a need for it. Being a Pastry Chef I mainly focus on fruit puree's.

post #21 of 32

Yes, I agree as I make them often at work .

 

As was mentioned above , a great tasting red pepper or vegetable coulis is great on a plate if you want to make a change from  traditional sauces. Spring and summer is a  nice time to introduce the lighter sides of foods and  the texture of a well rounded coulis is nice on the palate. .

 

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Baby Cake
(4 photos)
Victorian cupcakes
(10 photos)
Reply
post #22 of 32

Professional Old- timers from Europe might also remember a coulis created by German Army Cooks towards the end of WW!! ,when food supplies ran out and they could no longer get oil  to make their needed mayonnaise they were creative and used  ordinary tap-water seasoned with vinegar,salt,pepper and mustard,thickened with cornstarch and when cooled was used this paste to stretch or even replace mayonnaise. You had to feed your troops .crazy.gif

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply
post #23 of 32

If you ask me a coulis is equal parts juice from a fruit (most likely a berry) and simple syrup, which is equal parts sugar and water reduced by nearly half. I've also seen savory coulis made from grilled or roasted bell peppers. But in my mind a coulis is sweet. 

post #24 of 32

Funny some of the Mayo on the market today if you read the ingredients is almost same thing only they add some pateurized egg. This is the cheap way to make Mayo, right Mr. Kraft??

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #25 of 32

What I find amusing is that I made my first coulis at work today (a blueberry coulis to top some brownies with), and then tonight I run across this thread...  I used a cheap (read: out of a box) red wine, a LOT of blueberries, and somewhere in the range of 3/4 of a cup of sugar.  I ended up with about 1 cup of coulis when I was done.  It turned out quite well, and my chef was impressed with it. I'm still a bit of a novice when it comes to a lot of sauces, but I'm glad I learned about this one today.  I think I may use it again soon, as I seem to be spending a lot of time on the pastry line...

post #26 of 32

Blueberry on top of brownie is not a good choice. Raspberry or strawberry is better.. Color wise and taste wise. Although your berries were good you would even make them better by possibly serving over or under something like a shortcake or even ice cream.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #27 of 32

And let us not forget to mention all  the cheaters who use Melba sauce staight out of the jar instead of mailng rapberry coulis from scratch  rolleyes.gif

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

Blueberry on top of brownie is not a good choice. Raspberry or strawberry is better.. Color wise and taste wise. Although your berries were good you would even make them better by possibly serving over or under something like a shortcake or even ice cream.



Funnily enough, I made a strawberry coulis today to go with a few other desserts, including brownies, and I think it worked better than yesterday.  Although I like blueberries and chocolate, you are correct about the look...it was very dark and hard to tell that there was sauce on them.

post #29 of 32

Paul Alfred, I noticed you were a line cook in San Antonio, Texas. I live there too,

May i ask where you work at i'd like to come in and eat at the restaurant if i can...

post #30 of 32

tcarmichael, sorry for not responding faster...I've been offline for a bit.  I'll PM you!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs