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Greeting from a Chinese Chef

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hello every one,

I happened to find this site and hope to exchange my cooking experience with others around the world. I have been in this trade for six years in China and want to enrich my cooking skills and knowledge. I have received some basic training of Western cooking technique, but they are far from enough. I want to combine western cooking with Chinese cooking methods to creat more dishes. Besides, last year, I took a western cooking training program. I feel I suddenly entered a new world of cooking, which I have never encountered before. It's so interesting, fresh, and different from what I have learned. There is a great protential for me to learn more things, which I feel good. If you have any questions about Chinese cooking and it is within my knowledge, I will always be available. I also hope someone could answer my questions about western cooking. I have a lot of things to ask. There are too many differences between chinese cooking and wester cooking. I have many many things concerning theory, practice, skills, methods, techniques to ask. Wa. it's so cool for me to find this site.

Kranffi
post #2 of 24
Welcome aboard!

I'm sure you'll find the people here very helpful. I'm also sure we'll be asking you some questions on Chinese cooking!

It's a great site, have a good time! :chef:
"Our lives are not in the lap of the gods, but in the lap of our cooks." -Lin Yutang
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"Our lives are not in the lap of the gods, but in the lap of our cooks." -Lin Yutang
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post #3 of 24
Welcome aboard!

Got a good recipe for Chinese duck?

I particularly like duck and noodle soup.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #4 of 24
Considering you are a chef in China, your master of the english language is excellent. ;)

I have a question about the use of corn starch in Chinese cooking. I know it is used as thickener in sauces, but isn't also used as a tenderizer for meats? What is it about corn starch that helps to tenderize meat? How does lightly coating meat in corn starch affect the end product compared to the same meat not being coated with corn starch?

I would like to understand it's use more as I believe it is a relatively unused product in western cooking?
Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
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Pam Gram
The Pit Stop BBQ
"Catering to Your Needs!"
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post #5 of 24
Ni How, Kranffi! Welcome to Chef Talk Cafe.

This is a wonderful place to make the connections, to learn and to share as you've indicated you'd like to do. We have chefs here from many cuisines, countries and levels of knowledge. Please join in and enjoy everything this site has to offer! Don't miss the wonderful reviews and articles at the main ChefTalk.com site.

Regards,
Mezzaluna
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am not sure what kind of noodle soup you mean. Well, I will suggest a duck soup recipe. It's better that you have an old duck, that is, duck older than one year, some Chinese ham, which needs to be sliced into pieces. Then, some Chinese dry bamboo shoots. You should put these shoots into warm water to let them regain the water again. It might take two days to let the shoots bacome sofe afterwards cut them into threads. Then, choping the duck into the size, which fitts your pot. You need a big pot. Then, boiling a pot of water and putting the duck into the water for at least two minustes. After that, taking the duck into cool water and washing away all the blood curds. Then, you got to have some Chinese spring onion and ginger. Putting at least three sping onions and a piece of ginger. Don't forget to slightly smash the ginger before you use it. Then, boil another pot of water, put in the spring onion, ginger, the duck and other stuff and some Chinese cooking wine. But don't put too much of wine or it will make the soup dark. I guess three to four spoons of wine should be enough. Remember, you are going to boiling the soup for three or four hours, so it's up you to determine how much water you are going to need. Then, boiling all these stuff for one minute with the maximum fire then converting to the reduce. Only keeping its slight boiling for three or four hours. Then, it's made.
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
In Chinese cooking, we believe that water in the meat is the key factor to keep the meat tender. But water runs away when you cook the meat. So we coat the meat with a layer of corn starch to provent water running away. Also, we usually cook the food to well done,so we have to use corn starch or the mean could be too tough to our teeth.
post #8 of 24
That alone is worth the price of admission :) Thanks Kranffi, I really liked the way you said that. One time I wanted to work in a chinese kitchen. I had a "regular" job, but I just wanted to spend some time in the kitchen to observe and just soak up techniques. I would gladly have done it for free, but alas it didn't work out. So instead I will look forward to your posts, and help you out where I can.
My latest musical venture!
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http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am very glad that my reply could be helpful. Here, I also want to know how the western cooking tecniques help meat keeping tender when customer ask, for example, a steak, at least one and half inch thick, to be cooked well done. Could you give me some hints? Thanks.
post #10 of 24
Hi kranffi,

In western cooking we cook according to the cut. It is not recommended that the filet mignon be cooked until well done, but for other cuts like beef brisket, we actually recommend a long and slow cooking.

Try asking in the cooking questions or in the chefs' discussion forums down below. You may get many more answers over ther.
post #11 of 24

Hi kranffi

Hi kranffi! nice to meet u! i am also chinese, living in jiangshu. :chef: also.
where r u working ? how come u english so good !
post #12 of 24
Thread Starter 
I am at Shanghai but I will go to Canada very soon as an immigrator. What kind of dish do you make? I mean Western Style or pure Chinese. I have read some of your posts, I guess you make western dishes. Am I right?
post #13 of 24
hi,i have 5 years chinese cooking experience,and 5 years western cooking experience,what kind of immigrator?chef immigrator or what ? keep in touch bro!
post #14 of 24
I have a question for you.

What is the best way to make crispy skin pork (belly - from suckling pig) - the kind where the the skin is blistered and absolutely one of the top three best foods you've ever had in your life? Where it is cubed for presentation... with the layer of crispy skin, then fat, then meat, then fat, then meat, then fat again.

Looking for a recipe that does not already exist on the internet and that can be accomplished successfully in an average American home kitchen.
post #15 of 24
marinated meat for 1 day ,then put in hot water few min, dry them ,brush honey water or malt water , slow cook in oven , done.
post #16 of 24
Thank you, but I would need specifics.

Preference of bellly of regular pig or suckling pig?

Marinate in what exactly? Exact quantites of which
spices, liquid ingredients, etc?

Hot water? Do you mean simmering or rolling boil?

Honey water/malt water: 50% honey and 50% water? What
type of malt? Malt Powder, malt extract? What is the
ratio of malt to water? a teaspoon per cup of water?

Dry how? With a towel? Overnight in the refrigerator?

Slow cook in the oven... 250 degrees?
post #17 of 24

question for chinese chef(s)

hello . was wondering if you could give me a good chinese gravy recipe like the kind used in egg foo young



thanx :D
post #18 of 24

unleaven buns??

Hi Kranffi,

I was wondering if there are any chinese steamed buns done without using yeast....like a quick bread...??

If yes..can i have the recipe...plz plz... :D
post #19 of 24
As you can tell everyone love Chinese food in the United States
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection" - Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection" - Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #20 of 24
post #21 of 24

Welcome!!

Hi,

Great that you are here. I was wondering if you could tell me some authentic dishes I can order at a Chinese restaurant. I have read that several of the popular Chinese dishes are Chinese American creations. I would like to try something that people in China would really eat. Could you list about 4 or 5? Thank you :lips:
post #22 of 24
Thx for the info Mudbug!! :chef:
post #23 of 24

ordering Chinese food

There are many types of Chinese foods, I can let you in on authentic Cantonese dishes only:

For dim sum:
shrimp dumplings, crab dumplings, minced pork fried with taro, radish cakes, chinese brocolli, chicken feet, jellyfish, chive dumplings, sweet silken tofu desserts w/ candied ginger syrup, BBQ pork buns, sticky rice with chinese sausage wrapped in lotus leaves, that should keep you full and happy. Also lots of tea, always pour tea for those older than you before yourself!! Happy eating.

For a regular restaurant:

Fried wide rice noodles with beef, crab cantonese with ginger and scallions, roast duck, BBQ pork, chinese brocolli, pea vines, swamp cabbage, pork ribs with black bean sauce, fried tofu, steamed whole chicken with pesto/sauce of green onion, ginger and oil, steamed fish of the day, want more?
post #24 of 24

Mangilao30

Thanks for taking the time to write all of those out. I will look for them next time we eat out.
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