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Jeffery Steingarten's Books

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hello Everyone,

I don't really consider the two books of Steingarten's cookbooks but since I saw Kitchen Confidential being reviewed I thought I would post. I have read his last 2 books, It Must of Been Something I Ate and The Man Who Ate Everything, they are fantastic. There are recipies listed but mainly I love how obsessed this man is with food. In one chapter he talks about toro and when he was first introduced to this delicacy. Later in the chapter, he ends up chartering a boat to fish for his own tuna!

His sense of humor is wonderful. This man is truly interested in food, where it comes from and how to produce it. From foi gras, turkeydunken, boudin sausage, to real certified French baguettes.

Have you ever tried to age prime grades steaks in your NY flat for 14-21 days? Well he has, and when he descrived the look on his wifes face when she opened the refrigerator and saw a bit of mold growing on the meat, I almost fell of the couch laughing.
post #2 of 7
He is a fantastic writer! He is droll and sarcastic... great! There are some other threads in the Cook Book Review section that discuss Steingarten. Do a 'thread search' for other insight, if you are interested.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #3 of 7
I have mixed feelings about Steingarten. Although he conveys quite a bit of invaluable information, he goes through these name-dropping phases (ate at Le Cirque, saw so and so) that drive me up the wall. And I also don't find him terribly funny. Yes, I was amused quite a bit, but I don't ever remember actually laughing out loud. But then I do have a different sense of humour. The name dropping, though... maybe it's because I lived in Manhattan for 10 years, but that kind of pretension is like fingers on a chalkboard for me.

Still, though, I'm quoting him constantly (MSG, aging beef, pizza ovens) so I have to give him some props.
post #4 of 7
I agree, I find him far more annoying than "funny".
It's "funny" in a chuckling "that's cute" kind of way.
Funny in a way my granmother might find "funny". Except my grandmother has a sense of humour.
Not laugh out loud, Bourdain, clever.
And clearly without Bourdain's edge. Or talent. Or experiences.

Also, food writers should steer clear of their views on nutrition the way nutrition writers should not do restaurant reviews.
This guy so knows nothing about health that at least he should have the sense to keep quiet on the subject.
post #5 of 7
Thought the second book was better than the first , but definately enjoyed both .
post #6 of 7
That reminds me, I need to pick up some Bourdain. I've been putting it off because I don't resonate with his excessive/chain smoking lifestyle but... from his posts to other forums, the man definitely has a way with words. Thanks for the reminder, I'm off to the library.
post #7 of 7
I adore Jeffery Steingarten.....met him last year at a booksigning and laughed uproariously throughout the evening. He thinks of incongruencies (Why don't Chinese have MSG headaches?) that just have me gaffawing.
He's a great advocate for small farms, premium foods, using whole critters and maintaining old recipes (boudin noire....now to get a recipe for Cajun boudin), what's not to like?

A couple of years ago I hosted an industry after hours party/potluck for Anthony Bourdin....he was wonderful! Nothing comes across as rough as KC.
He even invited a dishwasher/prep cook to NYC to hang with him for a few days. It was the highlight of that dishdog's life. What a guy for taking the time/energy to make someone's life more exciting. Oh, Tony was also into small farms...... :D
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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