or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Gnocci

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
does anyone know the tricks behind gnocci? The do's and dont's while making it? Any advice would be appreciated.
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #2 of 21

gnocchi

There are many recipes out there, you can make them with potato or semolina, these are the two main kinds. For the kind with potato you can add eggs or not. I don't add eggs because I like them really light and I don't boil them either, I bake them and this helps them become drier and less soggy also with better potato flavor.

After you mix the flour and riced potatoes together mix them well but do not over mix, when they are blended, the consistancy should be like super soft playdough. They should not be stiff, hard or firm in any way whatsoever, if they are you have added to much flour. The ratio of potato to flour is: 2 parts potato and 1 part flour, by weight not by measure.

You can use a gnocchi board or just a fork, it's hard to describe online. The gnocchi should taste light a delicate. The best sauce is a simple tomato sauce with basil on top or light cream sauce. Hope this helps! Good luck! Also if you err on the side of less flour vs. more, you could always cook up a few before adding more flour.
post #3 of 21
I haven't tried baking them. That would probably solve my complaint about them. They are usually soggy and lacking flavor. I've made them. I've ordered them in quality restaurants and just never understood the appeal. I'll try them again but bake them this time.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #4 of 21

gnocchi

Also use a good buttery potato like a Yukon Gold or another yellow potato.
post #5 of 21
I like to serve my gnocchi with a heartier sauce, though I do like them with a light tomato and basil cream sauce. I usually serve mine with a rich ragu of italian sausage and dried mushrooms. I think the potato flavor helps this to stand out more than using pasta with this ragu.
post #6 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much,
I've been making them at work and they are not working out as well as they use to. I was wondering if I was doing something wrong or if it was the potatoes. We switched potatoes so I'll just go out and buy the ones I need. Thanks again for your help.
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
I just thought of something. What happens when you do overwork the dough. Do you work the glutens up too much and the dough becomes too tough or the opposite. How do you know when you have over worked it? If this happens, how do you fix it, if in fact you can fix it. It know you can't with pasta, so is it the same?
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #8 of 21
we had a good discussion about this a few years back: http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/forums/s...hlight=gnocchi
post #9 of 21

gnocchi

The thread you suggested is a wealth of infomation, I will try other recipies.
post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 
What a great discussion,
you were right, how something so simple can become so creative and complex. Thanks for the discussion, I'll do some of trials at home and bring my results to work.
Everyone should read that discussion. :bounce:
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #11 of 21
Saw Mario Batali do a cooking demo last week. He said to use old potatoes when making potatoe gnocci. Just thought I'd pass it along.
post #12 of 21
Older potatos are drier. Cook's Illustrated in pursuing this line of thinking found that Americans eat potatos more and faster than Italians. "Old" potatos are essentially non-existent in the US unless you age them yourself.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #13 of 21
Thread Starter 
so when you guys say "old" potatoes, you mean raw or cooked? If you mean raw then do they not grow soft and gain eyes? If it's a drier potatoe that your looking for then why don't you just bake the potatoes or dry them in the oven the way you do for duchess potatoes. Just need you to explain more. Thanks.
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #14 of 21
Not potatos that old I would think. Old potatoes has never been well explained to my knowledge. I was just relaying what I had read.

I made gnocchi yesterday with baked yukons and baked the gnocchi too. Better than what I'v had before, but they still aren't worth it to me.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #15 of 21
I think "old" in this case means more developed potatoes which have a higher starch content than new potatoes. I used large russet Burbanks and they worked very well in Lidia Bastianich's recipe from Lidia's Italian Table. The dough was perfect and the product was light and flavorful- not gluey at all. I froze half of the recipe and cooked them later, with very good results.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 
Phil,
Is it the flavor or the texture that makes undesirable to you? Just curious. I personally am not fond of the lack of flavor so I made the pumpkin gnocci and really enjoyed it. Served it with a roasted red pepper sauce and put splashes of basil pesto on it. Maybe too much flavor but the esatics were there. Be a nice pasta course with some changes.
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #17 of 21
There's little flavor and no chew or textue, say, as of disintegrating interestinly like meringue. Baking helped, but not enough. No counterpoint or support for the sauce. Presents nicely though.

My kids all liked them quite well, better than other gnocchi I've served them. If my youngest hadn't recently had his birthday, I think he might have requested them for his birthday meal.

I am still intrigued by the ricotta gnocchi and some of the other flavors.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #18 of 21
The chef that trained me was a gnocchi expert, and he never taught me his secrets. Shame.

Anyway, i can tell you what NOT to use for gnocchi and that is sweet potato. BLECH! Where I work now we use it and it's terrible. I don't know what could have posessed them... Anyway....
post #19 of 21
I believe using winter squash in gnocchi is not unusual in Italy. I think it's a matter of taste, Skeleton. Squash gnocchi with browned butter and sage leaves is excellent. If you Google "squash gnocchi", you'll get plenty of hits. A similar flavor combination is used for filling ravioli.

I would think using a too-sweet or spicy sauce (cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.) would be less desirable.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Actual I worked with an italian chef and he had me sautee the Gnocci in a beurre noir sauce with a pich of nutmeg, then after carmelizing the gnocci, he ahd me deglaze with lemon juice. It was really good!
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
Whenever we cook we become practical chemists, drawing on the accumulated knowledge of generations, and transforming what the Earth offers us into more concentrated forms of pleasure and nourishment.
Reply
post #21 of 21
I do believe that when they refer to "older" potatoes, they do mean uncooked. As with many root vegetables, after potatoes have been dug they have a decent amount of sugars in them. As those potatoes sit, unused, the sugar slowly converts to starches making them more ideal for gnocchi. Potatoes can last quite a long time once dug. Heck, they were one of the foods still left, in the old days, at the end of a long hard winter, and before the spring crops were ready. The reason potatoes turn soft and sprout is that most people don't store their potatoes properly, in a cool, dark place. Your kitchen is not the ideal environment. As for the sugars turning to starches it can really be seen in corn on the cob. A just picked cob will be really sweet, but let that same cob (or one you picked the same day) sit for a few days and you will taste a huge difference in sweetness as the sugars turn to starch.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking