or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How much dry Basil would I need to substitute for 1 cup of fresh basil?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How much dry Basil would I need to substitute for 1 cup of fresh basil?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
How much dry Basil would I need to substitute for 1 cup of fresh basil?
post #2 of 14
Welcome, blossom22! :D

The usual substitution is 1 teaspoon dried (chopped or crumbled) dried herb in place of 1 tablespoon fresh. So you would want to use 1/3 cup of dried basil.

HOWEVER: there are uses in which you never want to substitute a dried herb for the fresh one. Pesto, for example -- oh, sure, "they" say you can use dried basil and goose the color with parsley, but really that's not worth making (or eating :eek: ). If your recipe relies on the fresh taste and color of the basil, it's better to make something else instead of use dried.

Remember also that dried herbs are usually added to a recipe at a different point from fresh. Because fresh herbs are mostly pretty delicate, they tend to be added near the end of cooking, if not actually after the food has finished cooking. Dried herbs need more time to reconstitute, and so are usually added much earlier in the process.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #3 of 14
I usually agree with the 1/3rd rule when substituting dried for fresh, but that is when I am using smaller amounts such as teaspoon and tablespoon. When dealing with larger amounts you may even want to go with less. The issue here is packing. Example when you need 1 Tablespoon of fresh basil you chop it rather fine, to fit in the spoon. It may be just a bit bigger than the dried you are substituting with. In the cup scenario, you probably aren't chopping your basil as fine, if at all, so you then have more air space than if it is a cup of finely chopped basil. So unless the recipe calls for 1 cup of finely chopped fresh basil, I would not add more than 1/4 cup of dried. And I agree with Suzanne, look at what your application is. Some things just don't translate well when substituting dried for fresh.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #4 of 14
The only useful purpose I can think of for dried basil would be mulch for fresh basil plants.
post #5 of 14
got to agree with pinot. there simply is no substitute for fresh basil. dried is a completely different animal.
post #6 of 14
Pinot and redace, I have to, respectfully, disagree. There is a place for dried basil. Definately not in uncooked or short cooked dishes. These require fresh, but in long cooked soups, stews or sauces (winter type foods) I often prefer to use dried. You can add it early in the cooking process and it creates a whole different taste. Personally I make a traditional Ragu Bolognese that cooks for hours. I have used both, dried early in the process and fresh, added at the end, and I prefer the dried. The fresh adds too much of a bright, fresh note that seems out of place in such a long cooked dish.
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
Reply
post #7 of 14
So in conclusion blossom22, it depends on what you're using this basil for. If you're needing fresh basil for pesto, you may not want to use dried basil because it just wouldn't be the same and not worth the effort.

What are you needing the 1 cup of basil for?
post #8 of 14

I need some help, i am only 12 and in Math callas my assignment is to make a respie and figure the costs and all of that, i found this website and thought it would be useful, so, how much is the cost of 'Crutons' and if i'm serving 33 students how much would i need nad what whould be the cost?

post #9 of 14

To the OP 1:3 is the standard ratio for all dried->fresh on herbs.  To the others a lot depends on what kind of dried basil you are using, is it Mediterranean, Egyptian or Domestic?  Oil levels and processing procedures of all three are different and give a different outcome.  Do a side by side of all 3 and you may be surprised at what you find. Do this with Mexican vs Med Oregano as well.

Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #10 of 14

I am canning brushetta and it calls for 1 cup fresh basil. Where I live NONE of the stores carry freas and there are no markets.

post #11 of 14

You've aroused my curiosity, perhaps you could post the recipe?

Quote:
Originally Posted by brendamike01 View Post

I am canning brushetta and it calls for 1 cup fresh basil. Where I live NONE of the stores carry freas and there are no markets.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #12 of 14

Posted by brendamike01 View Post


I am canning brushetta and it calls for 1 cup fresh basil. Where I live NONE of the stores carry freas and there are no markets.

 

Brenda you've left me at something of a loss.  The English translation of bruschetta is "toasted bread."  Presumably you're not canning toast, but some sort of topping.

 

Assuming you're doing some sort of typical tomato relish for spooning on top of the bruschetta, the amount of dried basil you'll need to substitute for fresh, largely depends whether the original recipe called for loose, packed or chopped basil.  If loose, whole leaf basil, you'll probably need something a couple of tbs of dried.  If the recipe asked for packed or chopped fresh basil, you'll probably need something like 4 tbs (1/4 cup).  If you're doing something else, the substitution amount could be very different. 

 

As a general rule, start with a lesser amount, taste and adjust.  Adjusting spice amounts and seasoning levels is one of the first rules of good cooking.  Recipes are only guidelines, not commandments handed down on stone tablets. 

 

In any case, it would be helpful if you could provide the complete recipe. 

 

Wherever you live, it's a shame you can't get fresh herbs.   

 

BDL 

What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #13 of 14

Agree with Pete . Totally different taste and different uses.  There is a place for both fresh and dry and even frozen.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #14 of 14

I assume you are making a tomato topping for bruchetta ;. In this case you can use dried basil.Take boar_d_laze's advise and start with a little and adjust the taste as you go along. Too much of any dried herb can taste very nasty and I don't want you to waste any tomatoes.

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply

Every smoker quits smoking sooner or later!

Only the smart ones are doing it while they are still alive.

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › How much dry Basil would I need to substitute for 1 cup of fresh basil?