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What Is The Most Essential Book? - Page 7

post #181 of 197

Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well by Pellegrino Artusi

The basis and the history of  Italian cuisine.

My homemade Italian Liqueurs and Pastry recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es/

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My homemade Italian Liqueurs and Pastry recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es/

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post #182 of 197

I heard there are a lot of revisions, not all good, to the original Pauli book.

post #183 of 197

I have my parent's copy of Joy, but I really got passionate about cooking after I read "On Food and Cooking" - McGee, it's so well written and for someone with no formal culinary education it was one of those books that sparked an excitement for understanding what was happening to the food I was making, and why things work in the kitchen the way they do. 

 

Since then I've acquired many, many cookbooks, and most of the ones on this thread are great, I love Pepin's work, Larousse Gastronomique, flavor bible, so many great books.  Personally I go back to Keller's books (particularly French Laundry and Ad Hoc) over and over for ideas and concepts and pairings, there's an approachable level of detail without "dumbing it down" that I find wonderful.

 

Lots of people like the Internet but to me there's something indescribably wonderful about the smell and feel of books that I can't ever see myself giving up in favor of an iPad.

post #184 of 197

well its not a book to have in the kitchen LOL but more, when you want to write your own recipes and combine flavors.

those moments that you go sit down with something nice to drink, pen, paper, and the thesaurus and come up with new ideas for dishes to try.

by the way, I don't think cookbooks should be kept in the kitchen in general, unless you cook from them.  (I mean, not to store them on a shelf ;) )

post #185 of 197

excellent resource!! thanks everyone

post #186 of 197

Chef Louie P DeGoue The GOLD COOK BOOK 1949?

Been my BIBLE 4 over 30 years!

post #187 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by akbushchef View Post

Chef Louie P DeGoue The GOLD COOK BOOK 1949?

Been my BIBLE 4 over 30 years!

I got this book 37 years ago, and it has been the principal source of culinary delight in my life. It is not simply the standard for cookbooks - I can't imagine any other one measuring up - but the best and defining one in my life. It brought 2 green bachelor kids from boiling water to producing incredible feasts for 20 people.
You want to make a REAL Mornay sauce or lobster thermidor to die for, DeGouy will guide you.
Simply referred to by us as "The Gold", is arguably is the only cookbook you need. My 17 year old daughter discovered this book last night and treated me to Homemade Tagliatelli - from scratch. It was excellent.
I should keep my mouth shut and quietly buy up all the volumes I can for gifts, but I'm getting generous in my old age - get this book and get set for the principal enjoyment of your cooking experience.
post #188 of 197
When faced with conflicting recipes, or to research the essence

of a particular dish (especially classic European dishes),

this book is a must. Written by a true chef, this book

will not disappoint. Note that not all editions are the

same. The best ones are those that include the comprehensive

index (eg. where one can find the recipe for "Roast Beef"

either under "Roast" or "Beef".)
post #189 of 197
DeGouy's Recipes are extraordinary, however, even if you do not cook, you will enjoy this book. Every recipe includes a history lessons about the meal, and often includes pearls of wisdom such as the following comment from the eggs section. "DO NOT rush egg cooking. Eggs are like some people -- rush them and they get tough. Cook eggs slowly."

 

Enjoy!
post #190 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by akbushchef View Post

When faced with conflicting recipes, or to research the essence

of a particular dish (especially classic European dishes),

this book is a must. Written by a true chef, this book

will not disappoint. Note that not all editions are the

same. The best ones are those that include the comprehensive

index (eg. where one can find the recipe for "Roast Beef"

either under "Roast" or "Beef".)

He never threw any thing out! Always in the STOCK!! And it reads like a Novel!! read it daily " 2 All the CULINARY WIZARD`S OUT THERE? It`s a must have!!  

post #191 of 197
Quote:
Originally Posted by akbushchef View Post

He never threw any thing out! Always in the STOCK!! And it reads like a Novel!! read it daily " 2 All the CULINARY WIZARD`S OUT THERE? It`s a must have!!  

I still like to watch JULIA!! on Baking? Remember "U cook W/ recipe's U Bake W/ FORMULA`S " 

post #192 of 197

I couldn’t see this listed; apologies if I am repeating something someone else has said.

I have Larousse Gastronomique as well, but I usually refer to Leith’s Cookery Bible and Leith’s Techniques Bible. I find them a lot more user friendly, they are excellent books. I’m not sure where you could get them in the US but Amazon sells them.

Good food is the foundation of genuine happiness

AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER

Ravioli
(5 photos)
  
Reply

Good food is the foundation of genuine happiness

AUGUSTE ESCOFFIER

Ravioli
(5 photos)
  
Reply
post #193 of 197

I'd have to vote for "The Complete Robuchon." Not only does he provide great basic recipes, but if you read it front to back, you'll realize that he stresses certain techniques of cooking a lot. Great reference, and a great read.

post #194 of 197

Of course it depends on what style of cooking  you want.  I agree with others that Joy of Cooking is a very good all around basic cookbook.  For technique, Jacques Pepin wrote two books a long time ago, La Technique and La Methode (there are English versions).  These are probably out of print but could probably be found on eBay or other internet sites.  Julia Child's books, her original French Cookbook and The Way to Cook (which covers a lot more than just French cooking) are excellent as well.
 

post #195 of 197

as for pepin, that technique book was reprinted october 2012.

think I would like that man a lot....

 

I ordered it just today ;) together with some other Gordon Ramsay books. (seafood and passion for flavor, already have a few of his pro aimed books since I am a line cook)

post #196 of 197

Definately

The Science of good cooking

teaches you how and why

Ever wonder how those chefs on Chopped put something together in 20 minutes with a surprise basket of seemingly non related items?

Read this book and you will understand, follow this book and you will learn some rules that apply to the development of flavors no matter what you are cooking.

post #197 of 197


   If you are looking for knowledge the five volume Modernist Cuisine set by Nathan Myhrvold and his team contains more info that an average person can absorb. It is way beyond a cookbook it is an oracle for modern cooking. It is an University course on modern cooking. Ignore it and be left behind. In volume 4  it has 14 separate photos of a hard boiled egg cut in half to show the texture and qualities of cooking an egg. It also has the temperatures as well. It is so precise , the amount of effort and skill that went into the production of this series is unprecedented. Before this set I was always fond of La Varenne Practique. Also Practique did not cost $650. The Modernist Cuisine set is the pinnacle of my collection. The photography is gallery quality, the pictures of the equipment cut in half are not done with CG but with the hands and saws of the Cooking Lab team. For a home cook this is not the book for you to cook your dinner, not even close. Home cooks can use all of Julia Child's books or The Silver Palette or the Joy of Cooking like most everyone else suggests. When I was a young apprentice The Repatoire de la Cuisine was always at my station. I have so many honourable mentions but I will not bore you with those at this time. My regards to all the great chefs and cooks on this site I always love to read all of your opinions and stories ( more stories). Happy cooking to all. Peace.

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