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Tiramisu - Why does my mascarpone keep deflating?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello. I keep trying to whip up tiramisu, and all seems to be going well. Egg whites whipped up to peaks? check. yolks and sugar whipped until pale ribbons? check. mascarpone folded in and whipped until fluffy? check.

but then I fold the whites into the mascarpone and i get liquid...which quickly turns to garbage. is there a way to tell when the mascarpone is 'fluffy' enough to fold in the whites?

or should I just give up and make a zabaglioni based dish?

cheers!
post #2 of 15
Make sure all your ingredients are at room temperature before use.

Mash the mascarpone in a bowl with a rubber spatula until it is smooth. Then temper the mix by gently folding in and incoporating 1/4 - 1/3 of the egg whites into the mascarpone first. Then the rest. Don't do it all at once.
post #3 of 15
You overbeat the mascarpone. Mascarpone breaks.
post #4 of 15
If you try again with the alterations and it doesn't work for you, try a different recipe.

This one doesn't use egg whites:
http://cake.allrecipes.com/az/ClassicTiramisu.asp

Tiramisu Collection
http://italianfood.about.com/library/weekly/bltira.htm
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
excellent.

what is the function of the egg whites? do they fluff/hold up the mascarpone?

and...how do i know the mascarpone is breaking?

what i'm asking above all is...what is the object of beating the mascarpone? should it feel like custard with the egg whites to fluff it up...or should it hold peaks?

take a peek at the recipe i'm following:
http://www.vtbutterandcheeseco.com/R.../Tiramissu.htm

thanks for everything already, everyone
post #6 of 15
Beating the marscapone incorporates air bubbles into it which increases its volume and creates an airy texture.
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post #7 of 15
The eggwhites are supposed to lighten the mascarpone.

You have to be gentle when beating the mascarpone, it breaks. I can attest to that having dumped at least $50 worth of mascarpone in the garbage (plus having to deal with the wrath of the chef).

Find a pastry cream recipe and use a bit of flour with it. Mix it in with the mascarpone. Use good vanilla and you'll be fine.

Edit: Don't overbeat the mascarpone.
post #8 of 15
Your perception of light and fluffy might also be an issue here.

It will never be as light and fluffy as say... cool whip that is room temperature or a souffle.

Think of it as light and fluffy in terms of maybe pudding or whipped cream cheese. These may not be the best anologies but you probably understand what I'm getting at. Perhaps "light and fluffy" isn't the most appropriate description for the recipe.

Try beating at medium to medium high speed and timing yourself. Go in 30 second increments, stop at each increment and taste so you can have a sense of what the whipping is doing to the mascarpone. I probably wouldn't go over two minutes. (If cream cheese were involved as well, I'd say three to five minutes). Trust your instincts, be patient, and remember faster and longer is not always better. You probably want to at least have something that may be slightly less than perfect than something you have to completely throw out. Consider it a learning experience. Practice never hurts. Good luck... let us know how it goes.
post #9 of 15
There are different brands and makers of mascarpone. I'm thinking the cream about20-25%.
Good mascarpone is made with special milk. Mascarpone made with regular milk(cheaper) has a tendency to get liquidy.
also, when whipping whites, we usually go a little Swiss. Mix the whites and some sugar over heat until blood temp, then whip.
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post #10 of 15
What does blood temp mean?
post #11 of 15
mme,
Blood temp--approx 98 degrees-- we mix our eggwhites and sugar right in our mixing bowl with our hand( impecably clean) over heat. While constantly stirring you will feel the sugar granuals disolve, when the whites get to a temp where they feel neither warm or cold we pull it off the heat. Then we whip
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post #12 of 15
My guess is that it means 98.6 degrees... (average human body temperature)
post #13 of 15
Hello.
My name is Eddie from Vancouver, Canada. Just want to say hi!!!!!!!!

The mascarpone and the yolks mixture are too heavy for the egg white to support. May be a few gelatine leaves would do the job. If it is a cutting cake replace the sugar with white chocolate.
post #14 of 15
Yea my pastry chef puts gelatine in everything.
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post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hoooooboy it came out well. Basically, the mistake I made before was that I was whipping the whites into the mascarpone instead of actually folding them in.

Now that I understand what I'm doing with it I've been going a little bit more crazy with it. Thanks for the advice, everyone!
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