or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New Orleans

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
New Orleans' fare has been a topic on ChefTalk time and time again. And given that the unimaginable is about happen, I think it is only appropriate that we all take a moment to keep those folks in our thoughts.


Hang in there, New Orleans and all of the coastal towns who are about to face some serious adversity.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

Reply

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

Reply
post #2 of 29
I echo Jim's sentiments.

I was in the big easy last February and fell in love with New Orleans.

You all are in my thoughts.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #3 of 29
I love the city of N'Orleans.

I pray and hope for the best.
post #4 of 29
I was there in Feb. also....it'll be rough not only on the city but the surrounding farms. It's hard to fathum what a class 5 hurricane can do...we lived through Daniel 12 years ago, houses blew down, electricity was out for days, kids went without homes for monthes...building repairs took time....it was a major trauma for the little kids.

Our prayers are with you.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #5 of 29
I read on CNN.com that some buildings have collapsed. You know what's happening to the cemeteries, too. This is a disaster happening before our eyes, on a scale with last December's tsunami so far as property destruction is concerned. Thank goodness we have weather satellites, or millions would die.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #6 of 29
We're next door to Louisiana. NO is a great town. I've done a lot of traveling. One of the things that sticks in my mind is the poor persons of NO seem to be really poor. Some to poor to evacuate. So when all is said and done, please be generous in helping them get back on their feet.
They're all on our prayer list.
Pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #7 of 29
I'm not sure the hurricane can be compared to the scale December's tsunami. I also highly doubt that casualties would be anywhere near as great as the tsunami even without technology but I guess we'll never really know. Personally, if I had to choose between the two, I'd much prefer to be caught in the hurricane.

New Orleans has skirted the brunt of the storm. You know it's not that bad when 40-50 people are inside a Winn-Dixie looting the store. It's the towns to the east of the hurricane that suffer the most severe effects of the storm, such as Gulf Port, MI, Biloxi, Mobile Alabama, and especially the city of Slidell, LA.

It's difficult to compare the storms for many reasons. Even if you removed all forms of life out of the equation, the destruction of the tsunami would be far greater considering entire communities were literally washed away with an enormous amount of water in a very short period of time resulting in little to no evidence of previous structures. Compare this to structures in the south which may cost more but are better built and a majority will still be standing. High rises are still in tact despite surface damage. The problem with the tsunami was not only the force and volume of the water but the debris collected on it's way including vehicles, houses, and rooftops which exponentially increased damage of all forms. Water levels rise slowly over a long period of time first to rain, then breached levees - wind adds another dimension of destruction. Introduce life back into the equation, The hurricane is slow moving, with inherent warning even without technology. At least you'd have a chance. And yes, it is fortunate this type of weather system has technology that provides for plenty of warning. There will certainly be an enormous amount of destruction, only time will reveal the details.

Godspeed to those involved.
post #8 of 29
The environmental issues that they will have to be dealt with alone after the storm has passed are just so incredibly frightening.

My thoughts and prayers to all whose lives will be changed from this one storm.
Is there such a thing as Queen
of the Grill? Why do men only
get a royal title over the
barbeque? I should be queen.
Girls like to play with fire too.
Reply
Is there such a thing as Queen
of the Grill? Why do men only
get a royal title over the
barbeque? I should be queen.
Girls like to play with fire too.
Reply
post #9 of 29
Yes. Most people probably think of Bourbon St by default and it's ironic that it is dry and for the most part, spared from major devestation. At least with the tsunami, the water receded quickl, damage could be assessed and cleanup efforts could get underway quickly. What's worse about the levee

The longer it takes affected areas to dry out, the worse it is in the long run on multiple levels. What is unique is that New Orleans survived the storm itself, it's not surviving the levee breeches, and the water won't drain as it would most anywhere else until power is restored and pumps are in place.

Preservation of life, availability of food & shelter, and estabiishment of communications are first priority. As in any situation like this, it will take time.

For all those interested,

This is the Tuesday, August 30, 2005 edition of the New Orleans Times-Picayune newspaper in PDF format. It is the only major daily newspaper in New Orleans.

http://www.nola.com/hurricane/katrina/

With the exception of a very few copies printed out of town and trucked in to be handed out to New Orleans residents without any power or Internet access (if they could be reached at all), this edition is being made available ONLY online. This is an extreme rarity in American journalism, and may even be a first for a major daily newspaper in this country.

Though the front page says "50 cents", this paper is being made available free to anyone that wants it. If you live in or near the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina, you'll want to read this for its news value and pass on copies to friends and relatives, since they won't be able to get a print edition. If you live outside the area, you may want it for its historical value.

Pages A10 and A11 are missing; it appears that they were never produced. The most likely explanation for this is that they were originally intended to carry full-page advertisements which were never delivered to the newsroom. In any case, every story in this paper is complete; there are no articles that suddenly end with "continued on page A10" or suddenly start with "continued from page A11".

If you're wondering why this newspaper contains a complete entertainment section when it's obvious that they barely were able to put together any news section at all, that's because most papers put their entertainment section together hours or even days in advance of publication, with the exception of a couple of holes left open for "breaking celebrity news".
post #10 of 29
I really don't care about comparisons. I just talked to a couple of buddies there. They say it's real bad. Both of them special forces vets. If they say bad, it's bad. Time to help these people.
We have many groups leaving and have left for the area.
Please pick a group that will funnel most of the funds directly, and give.
panini
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #11 of 29
I heard today on NPR that they're evacuating the people at the Superdome to the Astrodome.

Will they really rebuild New Orleans? There's now talk from some quarters that the levees may never be repaired to the point that they could support the city as it was. I don't feel entitled to an opinon on this, but I wonder what others think.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #12 of 29
Well our voted in politicians approved way more monies for those levees but took it back for the war effort. Might not be fact but came from a reliable source. Have been in touch with about half my friends, can't track down the others. Was told that monies was not the biggest problem but getting volunteers was criticle. Going down this afternoon to volunteer, will let you know.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #13 of 29
So true! We can all sit around and talk about how bad it is, how sorry we are, how are prayers are with the victims, etc. but we have the ability to do so much more! C.S. Lewis said something along the lines that if you are not giving so much to charities that it denies you of some of life's pleasures then you are not giving enough! Let us rally together and show our countrymen how much we care about them! Donate just $20! Have homemade speghetti one night this week instead of a NY strip steak... Watch your news broadcasts and look at what these people are going through. We have the power to help, but it only matters if we use it.

Another way to help is by donating things to help these people rebuild. The poverty rate in New Orleans was almost 35% when this tragedy struck, think of what it is now that so many have lost their homes, all that they have. Starting Sept. 15 an internet site that specializes in a unique form of bartering will have a section dedicated to helping the victims by us donating that old dining room table we have in the storage unit, or those old chairs in the attic, the old dresser we have with nothing in it, etc. to help these people start over. The address to this site is http://www.matchbin.com/katrina

I truly hope we will rise to the occasion and help our fellow Americans in their time of need.
post #14 of 29
Well, back at work to do some paperwork then heading down to the shelter our city has set up for refugees. Don't know what to expect, 100? 1000?. I spoke with one family that lost their mother, and don't know the whereabouts of two sisters. There homes are gone, they have the clothes on their backs, and no future. They will probably not go back.
I just hopethis story does not vanish from the media for it's going to be a very long time before things start to righten.
Monies is what needed. I had no idea of the sources the red cross has for acquiring things in bulk. If someone brings a shirt,toy,etc. to us, how do you distribute to some and not the others. This is why the dollars go further.
I hope all those at CT will do their part. It's not only money, we will need to find jobs for all these people for them to get a new start. If you have a job opening that need to be filled, please contact your red cross, they might even be able to relocate some of these people.
Panini
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #15 of 29
the front page of our local paper brought it home alittle more.....kids have no schools I cannot imagine the influx of kids into BR school system when we lived there the resources where stretched to the hilt, colleges have been abandoned (I went to St. Mary's Dominican on St. Charles, across the street from Tulane), people that had left their homes expected to go back....it's been estimated that it will take months before people can get back...disease, mold/mildew....N.O> is hot and muggy....I can't fathum what the flooding will do to compound it. All of the glorious houses that line St. Charles Ave. The French Qtr with all it's quirky shops/restaurants...oh man all of the great restaurants (what's going to happen with those that have no flood insurance, and most don't). Susan Spicer, John Besh, Paul Prudhomme, even Emeril.....I can't imagine the court system with it 's records....or the zoo, or the aquarium on the riverfront, or
any of the museums....the coast's shellfish/shrimp/fish....I've not read anything about the plantations on River Rd, 300 years old....
there's even talk of not rebuilding the city, hard to imagine.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #16 of 29

Panni

Panni,
I am extremely distraught by what is happening to my fellow Americans. I wish I lived closer to those affected, so that I could have a personal hand in helping those out. This situation, even though being addressed and will get better somewhat I feel is unfathomable in my mind.
I am currently trying to figure out how to raise funds through my restaurant company. I am formulating a plan to present to the powers that be.
That being said I am wondering if you (since your closer than I) know of any other way that I can be involved and help from SC. Is there any other assistance that my family could provide? I have thought that if we were closer I would certainly take someone into our home and help them, give them shelter, food, clothes (even out of our pocket) and help at least one family rebuild.
So if you have any ideas please share them with me. I just feel so horrible for the people affected and want to help.
Thanks
Frizbee
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
Do what you do with passion....the rest will fall into place..
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit; Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
  ~Rev. Run
Our Lives are not in the laps of gods, but in  the laps of our cooks.
  ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #17 of 29
I just recieved an e-letter from friends in media here that are hosting a Katrina Relief nights....next Thurs/Fri where restaurants would give a portion of their proceeds to the Salvation Army.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #18 of 29
Well, home for a bit. Family heading back down to a drop area to sort donations. Thank you to all those who have donated. We are almost full here in Dallas.
I can't believe the spirit of these folks! I'm thinking a lot of these people will stay in this area. I had a thought about organizing some sort of pot and pan drive. Ya know, maybe donating some of those old or not in use pans that someone may use when they receive some housing. I don't know? This whole thing is pretty overwhelming.
The problem I hear every five minutes is that the evacuees did not know their destination and families are split and in different areas. Can you immagine.
God Bless all these people and please keep giving! thx pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #19 of 29
7 years ago I organized an industry donation of "usable home equipment" (Second Helpings) from restaurants/country clubs. A restaurant supply house donated 10% off the next order of any restuarant that participated for their next order. St. Patrick's house a "becon of light" ....whatever! ....was the recipient, they have a job program (lunch/catering training restaurant) for homeless/chemically impaired people. After training for 6+ months the workers get their own apt. Well, they've been homeless so they need household supplies. Equipment sales reps have alot of leftover shtuff.

Anyway, I lined up a bakery to do the pickups, they had trucks going to the restaurants and wanted access to those restaurants that weren't using them, this was their foot in the door.

Country Clubs in particular have alot of smallwares that they dispose of often.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #20 of 29
glad to see CT back.
I thought maybe I could pop on once a day and give a little update on NO since we're so close and involved. If it's annoying just holler.
Thank You to all of you that have donated. It is truly overwhelming! We were team leaders in a staging area yesterday that handled the sorting and packageing of hygiene/toiletry products like shampoo, shaving cream, razors, tooth brush/paste etc. There is mountains of products coming in!! Thank you thank you. I am now an expert on varities of shampoos and lotions :D
I also want to tell you that the evacuees are most grateful!!! Most of the persons and families that I have had contact with are just exhausted and kind of in a fog. Thanks again and please remember that this is not going away anytime soon.
BTW haven't watched much tube lately but want to let you know that these people are not lootewrs and criminals. Got to get some sleep, bye. pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #21 of 29
The first plane of evacuees arrived here on Saturday. My neighbor works in law enforcement and was at the arrival and housing. They found drugs on the plane. They have since taken dogs to the planes and what little these people have left with. Drugs found again.

What to evacuate with? Drugs seem to be high on the list for a few.

Certainly not all or even most. Help them yes. But also be careful.

We've donated and will donate again.

Another neighbor was called out on Tuesday AM. He's a firefighter, SAR and emergency responder. FEMA called him up. Left within 2 hours and he was on the ground. His reports indicate FEMA was prepositiioned, and new people were arriving from Monday on. He has a very low opinion of the media and what they choose to report. They report only the worst case scenario they can find.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #22 of 29
Phil,
I agree, be careful. I guess I was trying to say that the media has done a lot of injustice. That's why I mentioned they are not all looters. I have not heard the great dissatisfaction with the helping hands from these people.
One thing we have to remember is that that city had thousands of people addicted to drugs and in the recovery system. Everything was cut off. So not only did the addicts lose everything but they are also withdrawing. this creates a bad situation.
I could line up 100 neighbors and be shocked at the number of drugs I find.
I understand what you are saying Phil. I want to sponser someone with a job and housing, but there is no way to get past history. They have no documentation or history. The whole thing is quite a mess.
Pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #23 of 29
The law enforcement guy was theorizing that the shooting at rescue people was based on addicts going through withdrawal. Hallucinations as their bodies re-adapt to chemical free operation.... Also some of the other terrible crimes, the beatings and rapes may have been induced by these out of control withdrawal symptoms. No substantiation, just theorizing.

Apparently, NO had no plan for the prisoners and they were just let loose? Haven't seen much on this if true. Could be some scary folks mixed in among the innocent.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #24 of 29
I suppose it's quite possible that criminals were released somehow, but I saw news pictures of prisoners lined up in rows on a highway ramp, guarded by corrections people with rifles.

I agree about the possible explanation for the violence, that people are without street drugs, but also mentally ill people without medication. Even a diabetic can become delusional if s/he is without food, insulin, etc. I've seen that happen in my classroom.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #25 of 29
no the folks in jails were bused out......late.....but enmass.

I love that the gov of La hired the last FEMA director as a consultant.....think the current idiot (Brown) figured out he's been slighted. What a mess! The feds REALLY messed up on this one. Contingency plans for communication and addressing supply needs IMMEDIATELY.....72 hours is the majic number after 3 days the rate of deaths increase dramatically. After reading accounts for days it seems that FEMA did not know what was going on in NO.....even though current news on NO is all over the web. FEMA not only didn't do their job they hindered the locals from getting helicopters and supplies (water was turned away)

It's great to see states step up, especially the mayor of Houston! He was trully impressive on the radio.....
Tragedies bring out the best and worst in people, and much like a restaurant if you've not got your mise en place nor an experienced person at the helm...
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #26 of 29
The Bush administration continues to insist they have been on top of things, what did people expect- it was a huge hurricane, etc. BUSHWA. The Homeland Security guy, who's also in charge of FEMA and natural disasters, is not fit for this job.

Still, the President insists they've been doing all they could and that it's the media that are missing the progress. Sound familiar???

The emperor has no clothes.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #27 of 29
Mezz,
Agreed, heard this before. The Brown guy was a family counselor before The good ole boy appointed him. He had to do it, so he could drain the guys budget, and have no complaining.
There is really no one to blame. We let this sort of thing happen. The middle class, have given up our power to the upper class poloticians and their constituants..
Pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #28 of 29
The sin will be if we don't insist that local, state and national preparedness remains as is. Pointing fingers, as I did in my last post (not without a little anger) can help if it results in everyone taking responsibility and effecting change.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #29 of 29
absolutely.....learn from mistakes and hopefully don't repeat them....also own up to errors you've committed and apologize it goes oh so far.....
I'm thinking the gov't still hasn't ponied up enough in remediation/apologies.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)