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lobster stock?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
when making lobster stock do you prefer to roast the heads or just add them to to your stock?
post #2 of 17
i buy bodies(heads), pull out the insides, and use the insides almost exclusively. Will maybe save the carapaces for a bisque or other shellfish stock or soup app. saute off the inners in whole butter and proceed for the stock.
post #3 of 17
I soak the heads in cold water for an hour, then roast them. I proceed with the stock as normal from that point. The flavor is slightly different than that of shells just boiled. I use the roast lobster stock for sauces and broths, and the boiled shell stock for soups.
We must be strong in the broken places--Ernest Hemingway
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We must be strong in the broken places--Ernest Hemingway
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post #4 of 17
I like to roast mine. I've worked in places that will "poach" lobster carcasses in butter, then toss the carcasses into a stock. The butter is used for a'la minute mounting of sauces and the like...
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 17
We used to make it from sauteed shells flamed with Pernod and with shrimp shells in for extra flavor.
post #6 of 17

I am going to be making lobster bisque.  Is it a good idea to start a lobster stock first?

post #7 of 17

It's essential.

post #8 of 17

After I boiled off the lobsters I shelled them and then crushed them up and made a stock with veggies and liquid.

I strained it off a then reduced it by half.  It turned out great.  Rich in texture and flavour.

post #9 of 17

I am looking for a good recipe for lobster bisque please help

post #10 of 17

I roast first, it intensifies the flavors. Don't over roast otherwise they will be bitter.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #11 of 17
I Order lobster bodies from the local fish market and boil the bodies using a mire poix. Strain then reduce.
post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by sucrechef View Post

We used to make it from sauteed shells flamed with Pernod and with shrimp shells in for extra flavor.

+1 only we use Prawns Down here chef.gif

My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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My posts are different , I speak in cm , Celsius , kilo's and call stuff weird names like Glad Wrap , Bicarb , Capsicum & Gravox . Might take you a little while to get my lingo but we're basically speaking the same language 

 

http://sneakykitchen.com/Glossary/translations.htm

 

Good onya...

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post #13 of 17
Depends on what I'm going to use it for. If the color doesn't matter, I don't roast. (the color tends to get a bit greenish grey without roasting)
I allways boil it with white wine and fishstock, not water. Gives it more richness and body.
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by olechef View Post

Depends on what I'm going to use it for. If the color doesn't matter, I don't roast. (the color tends to get a bit greenish grey without roasting)
I allways boil it with white wine and fishstock, not water. Gives it more richness and body.


I know this is an old thread but I like this idea for eliminating that color without resorting to too much tomato paste or other color/flavor.  Thanks.

post #15 of 17

When making lobster stock, I prefer to saute the shells first, as I feel this brings the vibrant color to the forefront and helps to set it.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post
 

When making lobster stock, I prefer to saute the shells first, as I feel this brings the vibrant color to the forefront and helps to set it.


Thanks.  The taste is always good but I hate fussing with the color sometimes.

 

Oops, apologies.  I did a topic search and did not realize I was in a professional thread.  Hope the moderator doesn't kill me.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheflayne View Post

When making lobster stock, I prefer to saute the shells first, as I feel this brings the vibrant color to the forefront and helps to set it.

I believe this is the way Jacques Pepin showed me when he prepared his lobster sauce, I prefer this method but you can get similar results from roasting.
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