or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beef Stock

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
According to the recipe on this sight, you should not add salt to the beef stock. It should become salty on it's own, however my broth (even though I followed the recipe), it still tastes plain....and needing of salt. What could I have done wrong? :confused:
post #2 of 25
You did nothing wrong. Stock is a building block, not a finished product to be consumed on it's own. Salt can be added as you work on the finished product.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 

Cloudy

Its no sopposed to be clear right? That would be broth?
post #4 of 25
Broth is made from meat and stock is made from bones. Neither definition has anything to do with the clarity of the liquid.

Your stock should be relatively clear. If it is cloudy that means you either stirred it, which you should never do, didn't skim it sufficeintly while it was simmering, or didn't strain it through cheescloth or a chinois when it was done.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 

Wow

In none of the recipies does it ever mention tat you should not stir stock..
Is there anyway to save it? :cry:
post #6 of 25
There is no need "to save" the stock. If it is cloudy it is more a visual thing than a taste issue, that and the shelf life will be somewhat reduced due to the emulsified fat suspended in it. No biggie either way.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #7 of 25
Cheflayne is absolutely right but if for some reason, (maybe the recipe?), you need it to be clear you can make consomme. Do you know the procedure for that?

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
post #8 of 25
If you make your stock correctly, never boiling it, and letting it
simmer for 12+ hours, it should be almost as clear as a consume'.
I roast the bones, roast the veg(carrot, celery, onion). I use
some tomato paste or tomato scraps. Black peppercorns, bay
leaf, a little dry thyme and oregano, Red table wine, and mushroom
stems. Fill stock pot starting with veg and seasonings. Then tomato
paste and wine. Then Bones. Fill pot a little above bones with cold
water. Then gently heat stock to a simmer. Just like in a consume'
the heating process will bring all the fat and impurities to the top and
for a raft of sorts. Having a spigot on the bottem of the pot helps
an enormous amount. If you do not have that luxury, then look for
a large used coffee urn at a used rest. supply shop or yard sale.
They are great for making stocks at home. I prefer to leave a beef
stock for 24 to 36 hours. If you make your stock right it will be
clear and flavorful. A stock will not become seasoned on its own.
Since it already has pepper you would season with a little Kosher
salt only. If any one out there has never tried the old coffee urn
trick, it is a real winner. Just experiment with water to get temp right.
I know you guys already know how to make stock. For what its
worth.

stephen
post #9 of 25
Oh yeah,

If you want to clear your stock or it has boiled. Just cool your
stock down in the fridge and gently reheat again. If you cannot
get the fat off, just strain refrigerate, and spoon the solid fat off
the chilled stock.
post #10 of 25
Thread Starter 

cool

Actually I do not have a procedure for a cosume.
It funny because if you look at the photos on this website of how they made their beef stock the finished product is not clear at all, on the photos it looks like its very dark brown but not even close to clear. Thats what mine looks like, only lighter.
post #11 of 25

24, 36 hours?????

Hello, im curious and surprised,, do u make ur stock for so many hours??? Thats so much i think (well in Escoffier book says about 24 hours),, but nowadays we cant do a stock for a day, i dont know if an stock gets better flavour if i make it in 4 or 24 hours. Im just an opened book, i learn of ur knowlodge, thanks

Gus
post #12 of 25
The stock is done when you can cut through the bone with a knife.
post #13 of 25
I was taught that 6-8 hours, (usually closer to 8), was the standard for beef/veal stock. Less than that and you will not completely gelatinize the protein in the bones/marrow. It's better to go a little over than under.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
Reply
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 

what?

Cut throught the bone? BONE? Not the marrow but the actual bone?! I cooked my stock for 10 hours and was noware close to that.
post #15 of 25
Yep the bone around the marrow if we're both talking about the same thing. 24 hours should do it IMO. 8 hours is the first wash, then you got to do a second wash.
post #16 of 25
what do you mean by wash?
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
post #17 of 25
Wash, boil. Technically the first wash is stock, the second wash is remouillage. That's just the way they say it in some places. Wash... heh, funny. :)
post #18 of 25
sorry, what i had meant to ask was what is involved in a second wash, is it just a question of letting the solid matter rest and the stock cool then reheating or do you strain the solid matter and add fresh water?
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
post #19 of 25
You remove the first stock, then start again with the same bones and fresh aromatics to make a second stock. Use separate or combine with the first stock for some killer stock.
post #20 of 25
would the same thing work with a fumé?
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
post #21 of 25
Steam Jacketed Kettle. Low Simmer. I got 24+ hours on this one.
100% PRIME
Reply
100% PRIME
Reply
post #22 of 25
No. This is only for beef/veal/game stock
post #23 of 25
thanks for the info. sometimes larousse doesnt answer EVERY question.
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
post #24 of 25
Do you mean a fumet, a fish stock? A fumé is something that's been smoked.

--

Chris Ward
 
http://eatsleepcookschool.wordpress.com - The true story of the year I spent learning how to be a professional cook at catering school in Avignon, Provence, while working as a dishwasher.
Reply

--

Chris Ward
 
http://eatsleepcookschool.wordpress.com - The true story of the year I spent learning how to be a professional cook at catering school in Avignon, Provence, while working as a dishwasher.
Reply
post #25 of 25
whoops...yes, a fish stock.
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
"Human that has eaten human must taste that much sweeter..."
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking