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Low-fat or fat free hollandaise?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi. I've been looking for a recipe for low-fat or fat free hollandaise sauce but can't find one. I know that fat free/low fat hollandaise is somewhat of an oxymoron but if anyone has any suggestions for me, I would appreciate it. Thanks. :lips:
post #2 of 11
I've seen a tofu recipe version but never tried it.

Google lists a number of recipes for it, but I have no recommendations.

http://www.google.com/search?q=tofu+hollandaise

Phil
post #3 of 11
Why do you need to use a Hollandaise? I'm sure you could come up with something else that would be much better. I just can't help but think that any "low-fat" version of hollandaise will be a very pale comparison. I would be much more apt to finding another sauce all together or do it up right and look for ways to redeem yourself (fat intake wise) throughout the rest of the day.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm not an experienced cook and I had Eggs Benedict and love it. I know hollandaise sauce is very fattening and was just curious if there was a low fat version instead of the usual fattening one.
post #5 of 11
Asking if there is a "low-fat" hollandaise is like asking for dry water.

The crux of a hollandaise is that it is an emulsion, which by definition, is some form of fat suspended in water or vice versa.

Even if you could produce a low-fat hollandaise you would, by definition, not be making a hollandaise. Ergo, there is no low-fat hollandaise because you need a certain level of fat to form the emulsion. Not to mention that the taste would be deplorable.

I'm sure some mega-corp out there, in an effort to cash in on our country's fat-phobia, has produced a "low-fat hollandaise" by substituting some other form of emulsifier, maybe lecithin, or maybe a chemical one, to bind their concoction.

I'm of the opinion that if you're not going to make the real thing then why bother?

If fat is such an issue, restrict your diet the rest of that week so you can splurge on the hollandiase or throw in an extra workout at the gym that week. It's worth it to savor the real deal.

Mark
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #6 of 11
In addition to the wise counsel you've already received, let me add:

ANYTHING can be fattening if you eat too much of it. Moderation is the key. And "there's nothing like the real thing" -- if you loved eggs Benedict with real hollandaise, you'll wonder how that was ever possible if you use a fake sauce, because it just won't taste good.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #7 of 11
I want to reinforce Suzanne's comments because what she added to the discussion is crucial, i.e. MODERATION.

A few tablespoons of hollandise on your eggs benedict once in a while is not going to make a big difference in your weight or your cardiac health in the grand scheme of your life.

If you generally watch your diet and get some exercise, occasional indulgance is nothing.

Have a glass of Chablis with the eggs benedict. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces cholesterol.

Mark ;)
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #8 of 11
Mark, another reference to an alcoholic beverage. I'm beginning to worry about you!;)
http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for answering my question. I'll no longer search for a low-fat version and will enjoy the usual Hollandaise. I didn't know the science behind it. Just another reason to go to culinary school! :roll:
post #10 of 11

low fat cooking oil

just stirring the pot....
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If no one will follow you, you can't be the leader.
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post #11 of 11
IMHO, Hollandaise made any other way than traditional should be renamed For it is no longer a Hollandaise sauce but a variation of a classic. Be inventive with the low-fat ingredients and name your sauce accordingly.:chef:
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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