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Pork Tenderloin Ideas

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
hey everyone,
i had a guestion that needs a few answers. how cand i cook a pork tenderloin so it isnt tough, without taking up hours in the oven. every time i pan fry it, it is very chewey. good seasoning blends would be greatly appreciated a well.
thank you:smiles:
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Squirt them over shrip
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when life gives u lemons...
Squirt them over shrip
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post #2 of 24
Brine it and don't overcook it.

Remove it from the oven at 140. It'll go another 5 with carryover cooking. Trichinosis dies at 137, (assuming your pork even has it which is quite rare nowadays).

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #3 of 24
I usually marinate pork tenderloins in one of two ways:

Asian- light soy (I prefer Kikkoman), splash of rice wine vinegar, garlic, sesame oil, pepper, grated ginger, dash of cayenne

Greek- lemon juice, olive oil, lots of garlic and herbs (rosemary, oregano, thyme), pepper

I don't like to leave them in the marinade more than about 4 hours or they get mushy. I always use natural pork, never the pumped stuff.

My preferred cooking method is cook them on the grill, but I have used a stove-top grill or just the oven in a pinch. As MarkV says, I take them out at about 140 or 145, cover and let them rest 15 minutes. Never had a problem with toughness! Even a little overcooked, the marinade seems to protect them from toughness. Leftovers of either flavor make a great main dish salad the next day. :lips:
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post #4 of 24
Hi there,

I have to agree with Mark.........brine it. I make a maple & apple cider brine, and always get an amazingly tender and flavourful result. I usually use pork loin, but have done the same with tenderloin. And as Mark says, there really is no need to overcook pork these days.

Need a recipe? Let me know, I would be happy to share.


Maple
post #5 of 24
I think it is tough because you are overcooking it. Tenerloin is a relatively small piece of meat so it doesn't take long. I usually sear mine in a very hot saute pan and quickly finish it off in the oven. Should only take about 15 minutes, depending on the temp of your oven. Pork loin will take a little longer as it is a larger piece of meat, but still won't take too long. Personally, I like to serve my pork Med to MW, at most so I find it stays juicy enough without brining, though I might crust the pork, and will make a pan sauce to go with it.
post #6 of 24
Don't take this the wrong way, but pork tenderloin in my least favorite cut from the pig. To my taste, very little flavor, so it needs to many "manipulations" to have it taste pleasant.The raising of pigs has changed so much over the past 12 + years because of health conscious consumers that the meat has been basically rendered flavorless. Go with a butt or full shoulder, brine, macerate and cook low and slow.Just my 2 cents.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #7 of 24
CC, that's how I feel about most tenderloins. Relatively flavorless compared to other cuts, whether it be pork, beef, venision, buffalo, etc. There are much better cuts out there. I also agree with you about the raising of pigs. The "health craze" really did a disservice, making pork a mere shadow of what it used to be.
post #8 of 24
I cannot agree more with Cape Chef or Pete. It's deplorable what has happened to pork in this country and it infuriates me that the rest of us who don't suffer from American food neurosis now have to suffer with inferior pork.

That said, I still love center cut pork chops and cook them far more often than tenderloins.

Tonight I did pork chops in an asian marinade of ponzu sauce, a little Thai fish sauce, sesame oil, hot chile oil, garlic, and ground Sichuan peppercorns, coriander, and star anise.

:lips: Yum.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #9 of 24
Man, I know better than to come online and check out CT soon after I have awoken and haven't eaten yet!!!!!:cry: :lips: :cry:

Sounds great Mark!
post #10 of 24
Alternatively you can slow braise it in liquid , brown it first for colour then slowly cook it, it never dries out & offers you some interesting possibilities as far as the braise liquor is concerned....apples, prunes, citrus,herbs, alcohol,etc
champagne for my bad friends
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(Francis Bacon)
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champagne for my bad friends
& bad pain for my cham friends
(Francis Bacon)
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post #11 of 24
I agree with the tenderloin being a relatively tasteless cut of meat but it's easy to prep. boneless and tender so I keep making it. I also brine it, tie the ends up so they are the same size throughout and use a flavorful sauce. I usually season, sear and finish it in the oven for a few minutes without overcooking it and make a mango chutney with raisens, or a fig/port sauce to go with. The combo is really nice.
post #12 of 24
Dang it! The poor domestic slaughter hog has gone thru a large transformation...(it seems to me) around the time when "the other white meat" campaign started (same timetable). The darn marketing department bred nearly all the fat (and much taste) out of our pigs :cry: .

Come to think of it...nearly all grocerey foods have been bred this way.

Veggies, pork, chicken, beef, fruit...high yield, good (or fake) color and long shelf life. Taste? No...we're not concerned with that:suprise:


Back to the pork...I'd also agree you're probably over cooking it if it's dry.


take care,
dan
post #13 of 24
oh my gosh where have you guys BEEN!!!? Find a local pig farmer that is raising an heirloom breed (we've got Berkshires/Tamms/mixes...) PIG that actually TASTES GOOD even the tender. YOU have them in Con. and NY and pretty much anywhere now a days. If you can't find a pig farmer let me know and I'll hook you up.

I heat a small skillet, olive oil, then salt the outside of the tender liberally. Sear over Med High heat on all sides, then throw in a 400* oven for 5-10 minutes approx.
I like mine with dried cherries, shallots, bourbon, mustard,a touch of chicken stock, rosemary.....sounds fussy but is very fine.

Sat. Heinkebein pig guy was at the winter market and the bacon was beautiful!!! Last summer I hired a buddy to cook a whole shoat...40# very very tasty. Discover good pig again, it'll change your whole paradym on meats.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #14 of 24
My brother in law raises a few pigs every year. I get it for the cost of butchering. Not an heirloom breed, but still better than most I can buy. Except the hams, not particularly good hams. Next time, I'll have them leave the hams fresh.

Amazing bacon though.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #15 of 24
Of all the produce and meats that come out of Iowa, the pork is probably the best and it's also what we're best known for. I go local for pork because I know that it's good...I've never, in all my years cooking Iowa pork, had some turn out tough.

I like a marinade of olive oil, vinegar, garlic, bit of lemon, salt, pepper, and rosemary. Couple hours in that and to the pan. I sear it in a medium-high preheated pan with a little more olive oil and then transfer it to the oven. I cook to 140. Then I throw some wine in the pan and use it as a sauce.

One thing that I hate is when people cook pork to well done. I don't like well done meat of any kind, really, and when people do that it just ruins it for me. Most of my family cooks things until they're black...even hot dogs.
post #16 of 24
yep, I can totally relate. I cook my pork loins especially tenders until they are medium.....VERY pink.....this past summer at the family reunion my step mother and actually the majority of my immediate family thought I was trying to kill them with undercooked pig. My brother's wife grew up in Utah and has to make sure there is NO BLOOD remaining in any meat.....WELL DONE is the theme of their kitchen. They can't figure out why Aunt Julie's meats are more tender....I just don't smush down on the top of cooking meats with a spatula and cook it til it's charcoal.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #17 of 24
You mean that's not the proper way to cook meat?!?!:rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
post #18 of 24
nope no smushing of the meat, no stabbing or abusing it......How many times have you watched someone cook, especially a burger and smush it repeatedly?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #19 of 24
WAY too many times. WAY too many.
post #20 of 24
I especially like it when they do that with a steak, especially a filet. Not like filets are already dry enough if cooked beyond medium!!!!
post #21 of 24
It's bad enough that we've already killed the poor animal...the least we can do is cook it right so that it can be remembered by its awesome flavor, great texture, and incredible juicyness. Cooking meat beyond medium should be outlawed. I mean, there are times that it's okay (burgers), but when you have a good quality cut of meat that cost you a decent chunk of change in the first place, why would you want to ruin it by cooking the flavor and juice out of it? I don't understand this.
post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 
thanks everyone!

also my favorite way to do it is with a beaten paste of equal parts raw garlic oregano and salt. zip that in a bag with some olive oil and vinegar... Man thats good!:lips:
when life gives u lemons...
Squirt them over shrip
Reply
when life gives u lemons...
Squirt them over shrip
Reply
post #23 of 24
Mangilaio-
Fun to find you here. I've been reading your gia-gina blog for a couple of months with great enjoyment. I recommend it to others on this site.

Sounds like you're having a nice, adventurous life in Italy. Hope you continue to enjoy.

Mike :cool:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #24 of 24
i like to do pork tenderloins roman style: seared in a pan with nothing but salt and a touch of olive oil, then deglazed with milk and finished (braised) in the oven. i add a couple of cloves of crushed garlic and a twig of thyme for flavor, serve it with bread and the milk sauce to dip in. dont cook it past medium!!

Erik.
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