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Pomegranates!

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
What meats would go well with a sauce with a base of pomegranate juice? I've been trying to decide for ages. I thought about pork, but I figured I'd ask around and see what other people thought. I've been thinking pomegranate and ginger for my sauce.
post #2 of 13
Have you tried your pommegranite sauce with lamb? It's a typical middle eastern combination.
"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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"Muabet de Turko,kama de Grego i komer de Djidio", old sefardic proverb ( Three things worth in life: the gossip of the Turk , the bed of the Greek and the food of the Jew)
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post #3 of 13
Lamb is classic.

Phil
post #4 of 13
Yes with lamb.

Also, I did a pomegranite gastrique with a venison sabble wrapped in fire cracker bacon served over a johnny cake with a duck confit/cranberry agnilotti and sage foam. It was very tasty.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 13
CC. That menu made me go to the books because I don't know what half of it is. And neither do most of my books....

Could you elaborate on what you mean with fire cracker bacon? The other terms I have a handle on, even if I couldn't produce them without some research and practice.


Phil
post #6 of 13
Phil...

"firecracker bacon" is a recipe I make by using slab apple smoked bacon, slicing it about double a normal slice, then curing it with brown sugar and cayenne pepper for 24 hours. I sear the saddle, cool and wrap with the bacon, then cure the outside of the bacon the same way.Roast to rare/medium rare. The gastrique is a classic French sauce technique of reducing sugar and acid (usually vinegar)until a syrup and use it as a foundation for your sauce. Duck a la' orange is a good example of a sauce based on a gastrique. I use pomegranate juice,reduced venison stock and fresh pomegranate. the gastrique was based on maple sugar from Vermont and aged red wine vinegar and a splash of port wine.

Does that help Phil?
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #7 of 13
Thanks.

Sounds delicious.

I need to get cooking a bit more to improve my foundation.

Phil
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
As much as this is going to sound like me being a complete idiot, I'm throwing it together by the seat of my pants. :crazy: I'll try and find some decent lamb this weekend...I've gotta go at least 40 miles to get anything but beef and pork and chicken where I am. :mad:
post #9 of 13
This all sounds delicious- AND, it's wonderful to hear form Athenaeus again!!!
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post #10 of 13
I think pomegranate would work great with lamb like everybody else is saying, but I think it would go well with most kinds of game as well.
post #11 of 13
Stephanie B -- if you can easily get good pork, but have to make a big effort to get so-so lamb, USE PORK! While lamb is a classic -- and delicious -- meat to make with pomegranate, I can imagine that good pork would also be sublime. :lips: The inherent sweetness of the meat would work well with the tanginess of the pomegranate, and we all know that pork and ginger is a match made in heaven!

Now, let's talk more about the pomegranate part of the dish. Are you starting from fresh pomegranates and crushing the seeds to make juice (messy -- those little guys will stain EVERYTHING! :eek: ), or using bottled juice, or using pomegranate molasses or pomegranate paste?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #12 of 13

sweet and sour = fatty meat

Like anything sweet and sharp, pommegranetes syrup("dibs ro-mahn") goes well with fatty meat and/or game. Duck is yum, quails brushed just after getting off the grill, foiegras, venison, squab, etc. Add a few fresh kernels when possible, and don't forget the juice, it's quite a different product(hhmm martinis....).
Sometime you might find dried seeds. Grind those with anchos, allspice, star anise and brown suger with great pork rub!
One use for the syrup in israel is ladled over raw tahini and eaten with day old pitas for breakfast(my morning snack during my shepard years)
post #13 of 13
As people have been saying it goes great with all game meats. We just finished our game menu run and we were doing a rack of venison with celery root spatzle, roasted heirloom carrots, chestnut creme fraiche and pommegrante reduction. It was definately a hit, we couldn't keep it in stock.
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Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.

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