or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Bread recipe for making buns??
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bread recipe for making buns??

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I recently received a Kitchenaid Mixer as a gift and made bread in it last night. My fiancee and I love it so much that we are considering stopping buying store bought bread and making it completely ourselves. I was just wondering if we could take our favorite bread recipe and seperate it out and shape it to make like hamburger buns, sub buns, etc, or if there are seperate recipes for each.
Not the sharpest crayon in the box, but I can still shine!!!!!!!!
Reply
Not the sharpest crayon in the box, but I can still shine!!!!!!!!
Reply
post #2 of 18

Making Buns

SQUISHA:
Good Afternoon. Yes!!, you can do want your imagination is thinkng about. They are both Yeasted lean bread dough. You must consider if you wish soft or hard rolls, If you want soft buns then you must consider changing your flour type. Anyway, if you require further assistance post back my friend. Any recipe can be altered. Good luck & have a nice day.
~Z~BESTUS.
post #3 of 18
These are the world famous Moomie's Buns! I use my stand mixer to make the dough. You can use any shape you like. I've even baked it as a loaf.

• 1 c water
• 2 tbsp butter or margarine
• 1 egg
• 3 1/4 c. flour
• 1/4 c. sugar
• 1 tsp salt
• 3 tsp instant yeast

• Place all ingredients in your bread machine. Select dough. Allow to run cycle.
• Dump out onto lightly floured surface. Divide into 8 pieces. With each piece, slap into a bun shape. Usually 4 or 5 slaps will do it. Place on greased cookie sheets or your bun pans, cover; rise about 30 to 40 minutes.
Bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 12 to 15 minutes til golden. Cool on wire racks. I like to add a tsp of onion powder and about 1/2 tsp dried onion to the dough in the bread machine. It maks a light onion-y flavor that it wonderful!
• When I do these for burgers, I split the bun, butter, and fry in a skillet til brown. Yummy! They make great sandwich buns too! Nice and soft! You can't go wrong with this recipe!

• Moomie's Food Processor Buns (directions by Karen Noll)

• Place flour, sugar, salt and instant yeast in the bowl of the food processor (7-cup or larger model) fitted with the steel blade. Pulse ingredients briefly to combine.

• Add the egg and butter or margarine, and pulse briefly again to combine.

• With the motor running, add the water (90 – 95 degrees) slowly through the feed tube just until a rough dough ball forms, usually about 20 seconds. Stop the machine, check the consistency of the dough (it should be slightly sticky), and adjust water/flour if necessary. Process for an additional 20 seconds, for a total processing time of no more than 45 seconds to avoid overheating your dough.

• Place in a slightly oiled bowl or dough rising bucket, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise for about an hour until doubled in bulk.

• Continue with directions for shaping and baking.

• Notes:
• To include your favorite variations:
• - Dry flavorings (like onion powder or Penzey’s Foxpoint seasoning) should be added with the flour
• - If you are using honey or molasses instead of sugar, add with the butter and egg
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the help! One question remains, though. How do you get the right shape for sub buns (oval)? Is there specific pans to buy that can achieve that or do you have to be kinda artistic with it?
Not the sharpest crayon in the box, but I can still shine!!!!!!!!
Reply
Not the sharpest crayon in the box, but I can still shine!!!!!!!!
Reply
post #5 of 18
fantastic recipe! Thanks! Made excellent sub buns for meatball subs.
If I want it bad enough, I'll learn to make it myself!  I'm not afraid to fail, I'm afraid of going without!
Reply
If I want it bad enough, I'll learn to make it myself!  I'm not afraid to fail, I'm afraid of going without!
Reply
post #6 of 18
I'm always amazed at how far back some of these threads run.

This one, for instance, goes back to 2005. Makes me curious, BreadCrazed. How'd you happen to find it?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #7 of 18
lol Nicko did say the search function works better now
post #8 of 18
     it may be an old thread...but I'll give the buns a try!  

    Before this I hadn't really thought about making regular sandwich bread and buns.  


   thanks,
  dan
post #9 of 18
Yeah, he did, Charron. And yeah it does.

A couple of interesting things about the thread, and how things change rapidly in the culinary world. Three people took part in the original discussion, and I don't recognize two of them. I've been a member for three years.

More significant, I don't think the question would even be posed nowadays. And if it were, many more people would take part.

In 2005, artisan bread was just coming into its own. Many of the techniques were first being learned by cooks and even bakers. Previously, excluding professional bakers, most of us baked bread merely by following recipes. We made good bread, too. But we didn't understand the process. So the answer would not have been self-evident.

Now even the most casual baker is at least passingly familiar with the science of bread making. We understand not only what happens, but why it happens. And the fact that using the same dough for anything from mini-buns to full-sized loaves is rather obvious. Baking times may have to be adjusted, but otherwise allee allee same same.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #10 of 18

I didn't even realize this thread was so old! Old is the new "new" I guess.

Yes, I found the recipe using this sites search feature. I found the site looking for sub bun recipes on the web (not very reliable for the most part but this time I totally scored). I have tried maaaaaaaaaaaany recipes to use for meatball subs specifically, only to find they just weren't what I was looking for at all and my family ate the meatballs and left the bun behind. Not this time!
 
I look forward to gleaning more equally wonderful recipes from here.

I grew up eating homemade bread and once I'd grown up and left home I was sorely dissappointed by what passed as bread in my local stores and bakeries (no offence to the local bakers of today, Im sure they're better now) So I began to make it myself. 20 years later it's almost as good as Moms. Nothing replaces the smell of homemade bread baking in the oven, nothing!
 
I made a second batch of buns for lunches this past week. My family raved about how soft they still were on Friday. Lovely texture.

Thanks again.

If I want it bad enough, I'll learn to make it myself!  I'm not afraid to fail, I'm afraid of going without!
Reply
If I want it bad enough, I'll learn to make it myself!  I'm not afraid to fail, I'm afraid of going without!
Reply
post #11 of 18
>Before this I hadn't really thought about making regular sandwich bread and buns.  <

Shows how we all think differently, Dan. When I first got into bread making on a serious level, one of the first things I asked myself was, "Can this work as a sandwich loaf."

What I discovered is that almost any formula/recipe for a free-standing bread works just as well in a loaf pan.

Similarly, I started experimenting making buns---particular slider-sized. Lo and behold! The same syndrome applied.

Just part of the magic of the dough
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #12 of 18
The new new. I like that, BreadCrazed.

If it would only apply to my tired old bod.....
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post


Shows how we all think differently, Dan. When I first got into bread making on a serious level, one of the first things I asked myself was, "Can this work as a sandwich loaf."

What I discovered is that almost any formula/recipe for a free-standing bread works just as well in a loaf pan.

Similarly, I started experimenting making buns---particular slider-sized. Lo and behold! The same syndrome applied.

Just part of the magic of the dough


      It also demonstrates the benefits of a well developed cooking/food community.  When I first getting serious about learning breads I initially was thinking free form Artisans breads.  I then branched off , only slightly, with things like English muffins, Sandwich sized, crackers, etc. 

  But until reading the resurrected thread I just simply overlooked plain old pan shaped breads.  I mean, instead of buying a loaf of white I could start making my own...plus buns!  

   Life is simply too short to buy prepared foods!


   dan
post #14 of 18
I don't know squat about breads. All I know is that I went to a farmers market and traded an Amish guy food, and he gave me a couple loaves of white bread, his mother made. It was incredible. Absolutely incredible. Does anyone have a recipe for just plain good old fashikned white bread, or is the recipe listed here that la a few years old, the recipe I use? Also, I don't have a bread machine. Is it possible to hand mix the ingredients? Thanks in advance for your responses.
post #15 of 18

given the detailed description of the white bread.....

 

(a)  abandon bread machines all ye who enter here into the bread making world.

 

for a nice plain white loaf, check Joy of Cooking White Bread Plus.

designed / instructed for a hand mixer approach - I use a KA lift bowl model with a dough hook with serious success.

 

nice crust, fine crumb, denser than Wonderbread.

post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dillbert View Post
...nice crust, fine crumb, denser than Wonderbread.

 Try your recipe using a soft wheat flour like White Lily.  You'll be pleasantly surprised by the lighter texture.  And use 100% WL bread flour for your loaf; it acts just like AP flour.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 18

actually I don't aspire to homemade Wonderbread (g) - we quite like the slightly heavier JoC-WP+ - it makes for a really  mean piece of toast!

 

anyway....time to time I do have cake flour, so I'll keep your suggestion in mind - I did luv' an experiment

 

oh, I have a sad story about White Lily - after thousands of years "looking" I found that Walmart stocks it in our area - so I went forth and bought a bag explicitly to work on the biscuits thing.

 

so I did.  biscuits came out nice - definitely to reputation, light airy fluffy puffy etc  . . .

the rest went like:

"So tell me dear, what do you think of the biscuits?"

"I like your old ones better."

 

oops.

post #18 of 18

For my scones, either lemon raisin or black walnut, I blend 2 1/3 C of KA Bread Flour with 2C of White Lily Bread Flour.  A great combination.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Bread recipe for making buns??