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$$$$ Best Paying Jobs? $$$$

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
OK, there are lots of urban legends about the best paying cook/chef jobs out there. Oil rigs? Cargo Ships? Fishing Boats? I would love to hear to “real” stories and if you have ways to find these jobs for those interested that would be great info also.
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
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Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
post #2 of 22
What do you mean by "best paying"? Most money, regardless of working conditions? Benefits? Balance of work/life time? And for someone at what stage of life -- young and single? just settling down with a partner? established with a family? older and newly single, but still with responsibilities? There are a lot of things that could be factored in, not just money.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Just strait up hard cold cash. No consideration for benifits or working conditions. If some one was willing (or needing) to sacrifice certain aspects of their life just to rack in some cash as a cook what are the best oppertiunities.
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
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Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
post #4 of 22
Good money to be made in lumber camps, oil drilling rigs, and cargo ships. Don't have any numbers to give you though.

For every action there is an opposite reaction. These places pay high because the conditions aren't great, usually working 18 hrs a day. And the only recreation you'll see in most of these places is gambling, drinking, and substance abuse, all of which will eat up your hard earned money.

This scenerio works well for some people who have focus, have plans for their salaries (usually for seed money to start up their own business) and can keep a cool head and clean nose.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 22
Straight cash? What about overseas jobs such as cooking for the bosses at oil facilities in the Middle East? Those probably pay well, and you don't have to think much. Of course, you're stuck onsite all the time, because if you venture out of the compound you might be killed . . . but the money's good if you live.

I've got a friend who cooks on a fishing boat out of Alaska. She does quite well, and works about one month on, one off.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #6 of 22
Chef-Bob,
Your local or international hospitality head hunter usually will have one or two obscure high paying jobs.
Pump is right on about the gambling and drugs. Hard to refrain if you are spending 24 hrs emmersed in it.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #7 of 22

Money$$$

I can tell you, if you are looking to make lots of money, you may have to work for yourself and be great at it...
If you don't want that, I know few great paying jobs:
1- Movie Catering, but it's pretty hard to get IN!
2- Private Chef for CEO, Celebrity, or any other very rich people:):)
3- Cruiseship work is hard, but money is pretty good if you have at least 4-5 years experience managing people.

:chef: Personal chef is what I do now, I work for myself, it's a never ending process of promoting yourself, but I make $300 a day doing what I love!
I work 50-60 hours a week, but I only cook 5 to 15 times a month, the rest of the time, I promote my book, my company, I speak in high schools about being a chef, I sell kitchen knives, I go to function to meet more customers and I take care of my website... OH, and I spend time giving my help to who ever is willing to listen:):)

Money is important, obviously! But find out what you are passionate about first. Don't say cooking! but really find out what you like about cooking...
Schedule, the energy, the creative side of things etc...

then look for a job that will fill those needs. You will come home happy, and money will come in time. Most chefs that made it big, have diversified themselves to have potential to make money in all kinds of way... Not just from a JOB.

Invest, take chances, and money will come...

Martin
Author of "My Daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca/beachef.html
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #8 of 22
Thread Starter 
Martin
Some great insight. Just as a point of clarification. I am not looking to make any moves. I have a great gig as a corporate chef.:D I also have a young family and am not moving any place any time soon. :smiles: This chain of thought came to me after watching a show on discovery about crab fishing. Some guys were making huge cash (up to $50k in five days:eek: ) but you had to be willling to risk your life (crab fishing has the highest mortality rate of any profession in North America) and face the possibility that you may also come home with next to nothing. So I was wondering what the cooking equivalint of crab fishing would be. As a side effect it may help some one who is stuck in a rut find some new inspiration and direction.
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
post #9 of 22

Crab fishing

Hi,

yes, I have heard of the Crab TV show yesteday. My fish guy at the market, told me about it, he also mentioned that he did that for a winter. NOT FUN...

I was doing a cooking class at someone's house and the lady wanted to learn to prepare fresh crab and my fish market here did not have any available due to the Crab fishing industry not being able to go out fishing because of storm.

If you wanted to compare, I can vouch for MOVIE CATERING... It is one crazy job, great money, but one CRAZY job. High stress! EXTREME Catering!

Martin
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #10 of 22
The best jobs paying jobs in my experience are based not on the straight cash but expenses.
A friend chef of mine is working on a boat. She makes 75% of what I make. But, no rent/groceries/cleaning supplies. Also no time for movies, music and the rest of the little things I spend money on every day just walking down the street. Off shore so (Ssshhhh!) no tax. She makes 75% of what I make, but keeps a 100% of it in her pocket at the end of the day. I keep about 5% when I'm sober, and owe money when I drink.
Seasonal so we're talking six month work(hard long sea sickening hours) six month relaxation in tropical paradises.
post #11 of 22
There is a few jobs like that, you just need to look.

You are right, low expenses = more money in your jeans:bounce:

Cruiseship work is similar, $2700 for a CDP and $3600 for a sous-chef, 5 months contract, paid in USD, beer $0.85, girls, room, food, medical... but working everyday!

If I was 20 again, I would be there yesterday. I did on contract last year as a sous-chef, and wow, fun but working everyday away from my wife is not for me:):)
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #12 of 22
Chef-Bob,
I get ya. I'm old enough to remember the pipeline. Guys were going for a year and coming home(if they didn't fall to vices) with enough for a home.
There are some middle eastern jobs now that are fully expensed for you and family and a large untaxed check waiting for you at home.
I've lost contact in the last couple of years with a younger ex co worker. He was doing that type of gig. He came out of the service pretty disiplined about doing something like this and buying a home on the beach. He was getting closer the last I heard. He also told me stories of gathering up the help in the mornings and hosing them down to clean them andget them on the job for the day.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #13 of 22
Without throwing yourself or your family out on a limb, I would suggest country clubs.

If you get in good with the members of the club, they'll treat you right! Lot's of $100 handshakes in my days at the club!

Eric
post #14 of 22
If you ever work overseas, especially the middle east, you need an escape route. Most employers there will take away your passport as soon as you clear customs. They are responsible for you and their only guarantee is holding your passport. If you're fortunate enough to be a dual citizan, stash a second passport away, if not, bring an expired one and if your lucky you can fobb off the expired one to the employer and keep the good one.

This advice was given to me by several friends, some in construction/design, some as Chefs, and should be given due consideration.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #15 of 22
Pump,
You are absolutely right. You should never give it up, especially for that reason.
Most hospitality companies are not responsible for you. They could be liable.
In some places. You will still get your fingers, hands or other parts of your body off for doing the wrong thing.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #16 of 22

Hard work, long weeks and little private space

Have worked for the past 8 years in private yachting, a great Industrie loys of money............but you give up most of you private space.
Fun for any one with the right attitute.
post #17 of 22

Chef with Cash

Private yachting if you can run you kichen, from menu planing, provisioning not so easy when you crusing, cooking the whole menu as a single chef and cleaning.:chef:
And dont ask for days off when you have guests, get the picture.:confused:

The pay is any where between $4000 and $5000 plus tip.
post #18 of 22
Chef
4-5000. per what? day,week,month?
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #19 of 22
Exec. at a 4000 room hotel in Vegas makes 250-300k a year and lives in the hotel 24/7. If Sultan of Brunei flies in and wants a foie gras hotdog at 3am you're on it! :)
post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 
The private chef on a boat gig sounded pretty cool. I did a little poking around and fell upon this wew site: http://www.privatechefsinc.com

I am sure there are others but I thougt I would post this incase any one is intersted. For the record I know NOTHING about this company, just passing along the info. Use at your own risk. I would hate to be responsable for some one being stranded in a far off land with no passport and forced to cook variations of Kraft Dinner for some billionairs kids!:crazy:
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
Chef Bob


"Ask not what you can do for your country. Ask what's for lunch?" ~ Orsen Wells (1915-1985)
http://www.frappr.com/cheftalkcafe
Reply
post #21 of 22
For the most part, pay is correlated with financial responsibility and risk. The more responsibility and risk, the higher the pay. That's why it sometimes bugs me when employees complain about pay. Sure they work but the money doesn't come out of their pocket when they leave a case of 109's on the loading dock.
post #22 of 22

Money!!

I agree Kuan,

if you own the place, it could be a good idea to make every employees in the kitchen responsable for food cost... You know, if they hit target, they get a bit more, if they don't hit target, they get only the basic:cry:

BUT, how hard would it be to find staff:):)
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
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