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Knife reccomendations

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hello, I wasn't quite sure where to put this, but I'm currently in a culinary program and was wondering what was an inexpensive set of knives geared toward beginners/students. I'm looking to spend around 50-200ish? and have seen all the major brands wusthoff, henckle, shun etc, and can't afford what they have to offer for the most part. Also, what are your reccomendations for cheap sources, online or otherwise? Obviously bed bath n beyond and LnT, but what else? Thanks guys.

Edit: I know I spelled recommendation wrong.
post #2 of 9
Try Victorinox/Forschner, Swiss made. No fancy bolsters or state-of-the-art handle designs, but a good solid knife that takes a decent edge and keeps it.

If you do get "nice" knives, keep them at home. Nothing worse than that sinking feeling that your $100 paring knife is probably in the garbage can entangled in vegtable peels, or that that line cook who just got fired shot you a sh*** eating grin as he walked past your toolbox and then you cradling his apron...
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Yeah being that I'm just in school now and don't work at a restaurant I'm going to get a nice bag/holster to keep them in. Plus the traffic is so bad around my school that I ride my motorcycle every day, so I need something portable and safe in case I crash.
post #4 of 9

Knives

I used Vistorinox for 15 years, and 5 years ago I switch to Sanelli...

Light, strong and easy to keep sharp...

it's an Italian brand and they have all the shape you can think, I use a Japanese style:)
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Awesome, I was just checking out the Sanellis and they have what looks to be a very comfortable handle and they are very inexpensive. How do the blades hold up?
post #6 of 9

Great

Like I mentioned, 15 years with Victorinox, and one day I hire this cook who uses Sanelli. SO, I borrowed it and voila! I went to the store after work and bought one...

The blade holds very well, and it is light... I like light if you are going to hold it for hours...

I love it.
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Great, I think I'll get the 7 piece set.
post #8 of 9
When making your purchases, buy the best quality that your budget will allow. Forschner makes good starter knives and kits. Check out knives by F.B. Dick. This brand is widely used by meat processors and professional butchers. They're made with thicker steel than Forchner and have full tang with three-rivet handles. I have several pieces that suppliment my collection of Wustof, Sabatier and other "high-end" knives.
post #9 of 9

Hold and cut with as many as you can....

Hold and Try as many brands as you can........

I tried 14 different 8" Chef's Knives before I finally settled on the Kershaw Shun line. I LOVE my knives, but they aren't for everyone. Another brand that I really liked the feel of was the Global knives. But my best advice is to try as many as you can. Ask other students to let you practice you knife skills with their knives to see if you like them. Me, I say Kersahw SHUN knives......but that's just MY personal preferance.
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