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what book do u always trust?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hello,i dont know if i should study in this forum cuz im not more an student, i finished school and now getting ready for studying nutrition,,,,,but ill be a foos student all my life ,:lips:

Well i was wondering what book do u always trust about recipes????I have some good books: well i trust much 2: one from the CIA and other from Wayne Gisslen (im sorry if i didnt write it well). But what books do u trust about recipes? In patisserie, in salted food, catering,,,, but maybe not just books,,,,,magazines, webpages,,,,,,where u can warrant u will have a really good recipes, with real quantities and good explanation, maybe u recomend a brand of books,, what else. I have some books,,,,,,but i dont trust all of them, hehe, take care

Thanks

Gus
post #2 of 19
I have quite a few. But I guess the three I go to the most are my two books by Bo Friberg The Advanced Professional Pastry Chef and On Food and Cooking by Harold Mcgee (not a recipe book). I have Dessert Circus by Jacques Torres that I refer to at times.
post #3 of 19

Recipe book!

This is not the best recipe book, but by far the best book for professional chefs!
It will inspire you everytimes...

"Culinary Artistry":bounce:
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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post #4 of 19
I second the "On Food and Cooking"
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #5 of 19
Le Grand Livre de Cuisine, by Alain Ducasse. For pastry reference I like the Larousse des Desserts by Pierre Hermé and Ducasse's Grand Livre des Desserts. I'm not a huge fan of textbooks - I've been let down by them before (many different chefs contribute to those). All the recipes and techniques from Ducasse's books I've used have been very good, however these books are very expensive.
post #6 of 19
Pauli's "Classical Cooking the modern way". Solid stuff, maybe not cutting edge, but very solid.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks!!

Hello, thanks for all ur special answers, I will have them on my mind! That's golden advice!!!!

I will try to check those books!!!!!!!!

Thanks so much from Peru

Gus
post #8 of 19
Joy of Cooking is an old standard. Try to find an older edition, not the latest one.

The Encyclopedia of Creative Cooking I use frequently.

James Petersen's "Sauces".

LaRousse's "The Sauce Bible".

The Cook's Handbook by Prue Leith is great for technique and many basic recipes.

The "Taste" section of the Minneapolis Star Tribune has had many very good recipes, many from restaurants.

The New York Times Cookbook.

And a really old standard "Escoffier's Cookbook".

doc
post #9 of 19
Hmmm....while I do like Professional Cooking by Gisslen

I tend to prefer On Cooking by Labensky et al and THIS VERSION is almost identical and $50 cheaper.
post #10 of 19
I also second this set (two books, one techniques the other recipes)
post #11 of 19
I always find myself referring to my battered copy of the cias text, and the Larsousse
My life, my choice.....
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My life, my choice.....
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post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks!

Thanks for ur advice!!!!!!
Any book for pastry??? a cia book???????thanks so much!


kind regards!

Gus
post #13 of 19
Bo Freiburg for pastry definitely just because all of the recipes work.
Many celeb chef cookbooks are junk. Bo is the man.
I worked at a famous (here to be unnamed) restaurant in Philadelphia, the chef there wrote a book and had it published to great fanfare. He left out many key ingredients so people would not be able to replicate his dishes.
Ironically one employee allegedly stole all of chefs notes and recipes before he left/got fired. Go Figure.
For a good all around book that has saved my but many times and will fit in your toolbox I would recommend the Fanny Farmer Cookbook. Corny? absolutely, but it is small and has LOTS of diferent recipes that are all tested. Great for reference on the fly. Just my .02
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #14 of 19
First, I'd like to give shout outs to deladoc and ratbastard...Yo!, what's poppin'? I don't want to be redundant, but I felt moved to give further weight to some of the literary works mentioned as good old stand-by fav's of mine. Joy of cooking; Sauce Bible; Escoffier...excellent reference works! Fannie Mae?...I just bought a 1939 edition at some hippie book store for five bucks and it's very cool. I've been using Jane Brody's Good Food Gourmet for things like soup ideas and little party treats, sorta like before Barefoot Contessa became the next Martha Stewart incarnate (Should I start a thread on those two? I won't be friendly...). And for what it's worth, "If You Can't Take The Heat" and "Becoming a Chef" have some cool recipe ideas along with inspiririing thoughts. Anthony Bourdaiin's "Las Halle" recipe book is pretty cool and is a good Ameri-French reference.
post #15 of 19
on food and cookind, from harold mcgee, its all about the science..


can u boil water. can u poach an egg whats in between? a chef or chief or whatever. BUT THE CREW. a cooks life right, it never ends, sorry i have to clean the walk in, forget the newborn, its about the crew. it sucks to be the chief or cook but who else is willing to be that? jolly, forget the fish stock and , $$$$ u fortgot about the pressure in the kitchen, dude. pie off. smile we all have a rough weakend, but someone has to cook.
post #16 of 19
Shirley Corriher's Cookwise has been a solid reference for many years. There are great recipes and solid scientific explanations of how and why food behaves the way it does. Plus, I love Shirley's writing style. She makes any topic accessible and understandable without making you feel like your reading a doctoral thesis.
I think Jolly Roger may have been referring to Fannie Farmer's cookbooks. (Fannie Mae is an investment strategy) I love her books too and have recently purchased one of the original magazines from her Boston Cooking School dated 1936. It's really fun to see how cooking and eating has changed in the years since.

www.foodandphoto.com

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #17 of 19

hi

hi, did you check out the new one just appeared in the market. however i believe the enlish translation will only be out by next year.

regards
post #18 of 19

hi

hi, you may want to check out the various books of the crafts school Richmont in Luzern Switzerland, they are excellent as they truley touch the basics, which you have to know. thereafter it is your mind and creativity.

regards
post #19 of 19
Rarely use a book for recipes unless I'm baking. Use them more for inspiration. I have to second culinary artistry. I also like The French Laundry and Trotter's books for inspiration.
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I'm a glorified babysitter...........Yippeeee!!!!!!!
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