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Calphalon One not-Nonstick vs. All-clad Stainless?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Howdy all,

I've read through this forum and not found an answer to my question. Please forgive me if it's already been hashed and I just missed it.

I want to replace all the junk I've been cooking with (except my 12" cast-iron skillet, of course). I have my choices down to the Calphalon One Infused Anodized 10-pc set (NOT Nonstick) or the All-clad Stainless 10-pc set.

I know buying a pre-packaged set is not "preferred", but compared to the prices of Open Stock, I'll get just about everything I want, plus some extra pieces for about the same money.

I'm leaning towards the C1. But I have seen here that All-clad is a HEAVY favorite amongst you all.

If I believe the Calphalon Marketing department, the C1 stuff will cook just as well as the All-clad, but with less sticking and easier clean-up. The only downside (compared to the AC SS) is they are not dishwasher-safe. Cosmetics-wise, they both look fine to me, so looks are not a factor in my decision. I'm okay with not putting the C1 stuff in the dishwasher.

So, is the Calphalon Marketing department to be believed? Or would it be more truthful to say the C1 stuff cooks nearly as well and the real decision is whether I trade a bit of "stick"-iness and easy cleanup for slightly (?) better cooking?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

- Stuart
- Stuart
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- Stuart
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post #2 of 19
Welcome to the forum!

I hope you get a response from someone who has both, and uses both at home. If I had to choose between the two alternatives you gave no doubt I'd go with the All-clad.

You may be right, but if it were my money I'd be afraid of trading that delicious golden brown crust that comes after the stick for slightly easier cleanup.

Good luck and happy cooking whatever you decide. Let us know how it turned out.
just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
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just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
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post #3 of 19
I wouldn't let the "dishwasher safe" issue affect my decision at all. I simply don't believe that you should put any pot or pan in the dishwasher.
post #4 of 19
I have, and use, both. I have not found the Calphelon One to be as 'non stick' as they claim. I really have not found it any better than the older Calphelon professional. I do like my AllClad, but I have other brands that work well also. I have never bought a set of cookware, but pick up one of these, or one of those, when a bargain presents itself.
post #5 of 19
ALL CLAD.

Plain and simple.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Skillet, thanks for the response.

CastIron, I agree that it's not a factor in my decision.

Mannlicher, thanks for the response. I was hoping to hear from somebody that had and uses both. As it happens, I got a NIB 10-pc. set of the C1 on eBay this morning for $350. Compared to what I'd pay to buy individual pieces of this and that, I figure even if I only end up really using 2 of the pots or pans in this set, I won't have really lost much money. And I'll have a bunch of extra stuff that will probably come in handy occasionally.

MarkV, the question is plain, but I haven't found it to be simple. If you can possibly explain what it is about the AC (compared to the C1) that makes the answer so simple, I would appreciate it. I may yet buy some of the AC stuff.

As it is, besides you all, I asked the one and only prof. chef that I know personally the same question I posted here and she basically told me I'd probably be happier with the C1 stuff, which is why I went ahead and jumped on what looked like a good deal on eBay.
- Stuart
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- Stuart
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post #7 of 19
Most importantly, All Clad is heavier gauge. This provides better heat retention and distribution, and along with superior construction, means your grandchildren will be able to cook with them.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #8 of 19
and you have the debate on none stick being toxic which is fuming up again. I read a review by CI which said they did not find the new Calphelon One none stick to be very good. I must say never found a none stick yet that stayed none stick very long even Excailber used on Ultrex scraches and food begins to stick. Stainless steel and CI recomends to put oil in the pan when heating it. The oil will begin to ripple or smoke which lets you know when it's at the right temp. They also said not to move the food around but wait until it starts to brown since this will free it from the pan. It's hard to just let it sit but i have learned to. :smoking:

http://www.consumersearch.com/www/ki...fullstory.html
Calphalon's most recent line, Calphalon One (*est. $580/10-piece set), claims to have "the best qualities of both traditional metal and nonstick cookware," so Cook's Illustrated put it to the test. The review pitted Calphalon One against the editors' favorite traditional and nonstick skillets from All-Clad. Cook’s Illustrated found that scraping was required to flip salmon filets and hash browns. Stir-fry chicken and scrambled eggs did not release from the pan as they would from a traditional nonstick. In conclusion, Cook's Illustrated's review found that Calphalon One is an expensive choice that can't replace a regular nonstick skillet. Note that Cook’s Illustrated found the Calphalon One's skillet to perform well with seared steak. It provided good color, crust development and adequate fond (the little crusty bits left behind in the pan that help create a rich sauce).
post #9 of 19
just wanted to throw this out if there is a Marshalls near you. I just bought everyone in the kitchen a present.
They had allclad alum. 10" skillets $25, 8qt stock pot$43. etc.
they also had many non stick all clad but a little higher in price.
I can't tell you how old my stainless/alum is but I did buy a non stick 8 qt with lid just to try. $71,99

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
I just wanted to follow up on this now that I have received my Calphalon One cookware. It is NOT the Nonstick variety.

I have only cooked one thing so far that I thought was any kind of "test" at all. The first step of which was browning some hamburger meat. When I cook this, I normally expect to end up with some meat stuck to the bottom of the pan afterwards that requires a little scrubbing to get out. Maybe that's because I've never cooked with good quality cookware before.

Anyway, with the C1, the meat browned perfectly. It cooked evenly all over. And I didn't have any trouble with anything sticking to the pan. Cleanup was as easy as could be. A good swipe with some soapy water and the green scrubby side of a sponge and it was done.

Maybe All-clad stainless would clean up as easy. I don't know. But I don't think it could have been any easier. And since my food cooked perfectly, I am very happy with the C1.

Thanks again to everyone that took the time to provide some constructive input.
- Stuart
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- Stuart
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post #11 of 19

Stainless vs. Non-Stick

I'm a casual chef (I cook at least twice a week and I'm pretty good.) Initially, I used non-stick cookware because it's usually easier to clean. Since then, I started using stainless steel cookware and I love the heat conductibility. I use more oil and butter, but I don't mind. I also don't have any problem cleaning my stainless steel pans because now I just use Ajax, S.O.S., or steel wool. It's great! Anyway... I compiled all my thoughts (and some other peoples') on Comparati.com. Just go there and search 'stainless steel cookware' vs 'non-stick cookware.' It simplifies things.
post #12 of 19
I'm not sure what to think about questions like this. Sorry I'm so late to answer. Great pans don't always clean up well. Pans that clean up well only cook well with a small number of things. I have ALL-Clad and Mauviel with Calphalon One for non-stick. You only use non-stick pans for a very small number of things like stirfry and cooking eggs. Most everything you're going to use a "stick" pan for. Even though they told you it was not non-stick it sure looks like non-stick to me - "Infused anodized cookware provides a smooth metal surface that is stick-resistant. Interior and exterior surfaces are infused with an advanced release polymer.". Maybe they're avoiding the non-stick label because of the scare over the healthiness of the non-stick coating.

For browning hamburger you probably could have used just about anything. Make a pan sauce in it and you'll see the difference between cookware in the All-Clad/Mauviel range and Calphalon One. I guess what this comes down to is use the best tool for the job. Calphalon One will probably be great for browning hamburger and cooking eggs but I wouldn't try anything complex in it if I had another choice.

Grant
post #13 of 19
grantmasterflas is right. I typically only use non-stick if I'm cooking something frozen, which isn't often at all, or eggs or something. Everything else is much better in all-clad. I bought the stainless set and a couple of extra non-sticks for the special occasion.
post #14 of 19

Still PTFE

It believe it is still PTFE. Just different application method, but still good ole Teflon. The only non-PTFE non-stick material is Thermolon sold by HSN.
post #15 of 19
How do you know this? Did you measure the thickness of the pots? Over time, many All-Clad pots and pans have gotten thinner, according to measurements made by a fellow over on the Cook's Illustrated cookware forum, plus, different pans have different thicknesses. I'd be interested in the measured results you've obtained.

shel
post #16 of 19
If you're cleaning your expensive pots in that manner,you are slowly ruining them by abrading the SS surface. This will contribute to sticking. When I started using All-Clad SS, I encountered some problems, and felt the need to use similsrly harsh methods to clean a Ltd skillet.

If your food is sticking so badly that you have to resort to such means to clean the pans, then you are doing something wrong - either using too much heat, the wrong type of oil, or too little oil, not properly deglazing the pans, or the wrong cleaning techniques or cleaning material.

There are several threads in this section that touch on proper care of SS pots and pans. Perhaps taking some time to read them will be helpful.

shel
post #17 of 19

Dear Stuart--Re:  Calphalon one vs. All-Clad.  I have ALL Calphalon One pans and I wouldn't trade them for any that are not non-stick.  Yes, they do need to be hand washed, but it worth the effort for the money you invest in them and having them last for years.  The skillets and saucepans I use now I have had for about 8 years and they are still like new, even though I use them every day.  I keep them hanging on a pot rack to keep them from getting scratched and only use nylon or wood utensils.  The claim that you cannot get a good sear in a non-stick pan is just not true--just use medium heat and a little olive oil and get your pan hot before you put the food in it. ( If you put the stainless pans in the dishwasher, they will get a little oxidized looking anyway so if you end up buying them and want them to stay shiny, hand wash them.)

post #18 of 19
Whoops. Five years too late. Always check thread dates before offering advice, or... or... well this.

FWIW, Calphalon stopped making Calphalon One several years ago, and the product line is no longer available. Too bad, it was good stuff.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #19 of 19

Adding to what BDL said Calphalon as a corporation was also bought by Newell-Rubbermaid so much of the product line has changed.

Bummer for sure.

 

Dave

I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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