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Biggest insult to a chef/cook

post #1 of 69
Thread Starter 
what is the biggest insult to a chef as far as his/her cooking is concerned?

Just trying to prove a point here.
Thanks
Danielle
Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a a trail.
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Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a a trail.
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post #2 of 69
um. The only time I get a little perturbed is when someone asks me a question about my profession to win a bet:lol: :smoking: ;)

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #3 of 69
Danielle,

Haven't seen you in a couple years, welcome back.
CC
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 69
I'll add my "welcome back" too!! Good to see you again, Danielle.

I'm not a chef (and I don't play one on TV either). I've been a lunch cook in a small diner though, and my brother is a chef/owner of a restaurant. I hate to say it, but I've seen a chef, as a diner in a restaurant, get another chef out of the kitchen and complain about the food in front of other guests. That has got to burn.
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #5 of 69
Hey Danielle,
Not quite sure where this is going, but the only thing I can think of off hand that would get my goat is if someone critiqued a dish I made and tried to tell me how "it should be done".
Screw you, next time do it yourself, and don't ask me to make it for you. There see, just typing it raises my hackles!:mad: :beer:
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
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http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #6 of 69
Although easier said than done, I think it's extremely important not to intertwine our egos with our food. We must always remember that individual tastes vary greatly for a multitude of reasons and anyone's dislike of our cooking and/or techniques` could have nothing to do with us.

That said

I find it very annoying when other chefs have a different way of approaching a task, not a better way, just a different way, and they act like THEIR method is the only right way. I detest such egocentricity.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #7 of 69
seasoning before tasting.
post #8 of 69

Chef to Chef

What really thick me off, is when I meet another chef at a social event and some how once they found out that I am a chef too, they look down on me, because I don't work the line anymore or I work for myself or god knowns what else...

I really hate this, spinach is always green, no matter how great the chef is or where he works... a chef is a chef... when I meet another chef, I act just the same way as I act with any other person... I have always wondered if two carpentors would do this...
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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post #9 of 69
What ticks me off the most, foodwise, is when a guest turns their nose up at my food and won't even try it.
post #10 of 69
Not all doctors work in hospitals.
Not all teachers work in classrooms.
Not all lawyers work in courtrooms.
Not all sailors work on a ship.

etc. etc. etc.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #11 of 69
Well I'm thick skinned. But the biggest insult is when people assume that I'm a chef and my wife doesn't, or cannot cook.
post #12 of 69
2 biggest "insults"

- When someone won't even try an item/whole dish, claiming they don't like it (my family does this - "I don't like sardines..." "Have you ever even had a fresh sardine?" I would ask. "Uhhh, no, I just don't like them.")

- When people pour on the salt without even tasting the item (sure people have different tastes, but at the same time we do season quite aggressively) If people took a bite, then decided they wanted more salt, that's cool. But without tasting it...
post #13 of 69
That said

I find it very annoying when other chefs have a different way of approaching a task, not a better way, just a different way, and they act like THEIR method is the only right way. I detest such egocentricity.

Mark[/QUOTE]
Mark,
This is something you probably need to put in your back pocket right away.
It's law, when in my kitchen, do as I do or how I want it. This should never bother you for when you have your own kitchen you will perfer that your staff do things your way.
pan
one of the reasons I stay in production is because Ican't take it when a customer is picking up an order(even though they may shop 4 times a weak) and they ask 'is this fresh?"

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #14 of 69
Does this mean that someone can really be a chef but doesn't work in a professional kitchen/restaurant, etc.?

doc
post #15 of 69
[QUOTE=paniniMark,
This is something you probably need to put in your back pocket right away.
It's law, when in my kitchen, do as I do or how I want it. This should never bother you for when you have your own kitchen you will perfer that your staff do things your way."[/QUOTE]

Panini:

Allow me to add a huge caveat to what I said. If it's my boss, then that's an entirely different situation. Every executive/head/sous chef has the right to have things done like they want them. I have never argued about technique with any of my superiors. I am being paid to do it THEIR way.

My comment was more aimed at peers, friends, and equals.

But, allow me to say that there is a difference between the chef who has his own methods, recognizes there are other approaches, but prefers his to be followed, and the chef who thinks his are the only right way and everybody else is wrong. The former is exerting his right to run his kitchen his way, the latter is a blatant narcissist. I'm good at following orders. It's the attitude of the person issuing them that can rub me the wrong way. But I'll still do what I'm told.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #16 of 69
Well MarkV,
I'm not sure where you are in your career but if you're a chef and blatant narcissist is the label, your world is, or going to be, full of them. I'm sometimes guilty. Maybe blatant self assurance is more appropriate when it comes to passion.:rolleyes: i don't know pan

doc, sure!

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #17 of 69
Please humor me and allow me to give you an example.

When asked by my head chef to come up with the amuse bouche one evening I prepared a tomato & zuchini gratin. He criticized my recipe on numerous counts, the details of which I don't remember now. Despite his condemnation he told me to go ahead and use them. Midway through the dinner rush the head waiter stated that the customers were loving the hors d'oeuvres. My head chef beamed and thanked him and never gave me credit or a pat on the back of any kind.

So my work is crap until it's a hit and then he takes all the credit.

Now I ask you, is that not irritating?

But I never said a word and still followed all his orders.

Mark
Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #18 of 69
I get a little peeved when one of the busboys or dumbass seasonal servers tells me to "be careful with that knife"

or when I hear "ewww I hate fish" or "specials? I have to remember specials? I hate specials!!"
post #19 of 69
The number one insult for me: "Did you really make that?":mad:

Number two: "Is this fresh!"

I only wish one day I could reply to both without fear of losing my job!
Bill
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Bill
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post #20 of 69
when i was in retail fish, i used to get the "is that fresh?" question a half dozen times a day. My response was always, "no, thats from two weeks ago, but we have a lot of it and i need to get rid of it before it smells any worse." after delivering THAT deadpan, looking them square in the eye, they would figure out that, yes, it was indeed fresh. sometimes a bit of humor diffuses that situation, and that particular guest will NEVER ask that question again.

Erik.
post #21 of 69
Have you ever had managers who think they know more about cooking than you? THAT, is annoying.

Ah wait, now I know the reason behind our screwed up measuring system, so people can't bring in a recipe and scale it up for us! :D
post #22 of 69

In my case!

I'm not a chef, just a cook helper probably.

But my family are who make me feel worst. I cooked a cebiche in a different way asked by my parents. It didnt taste bad, just a little diffrent.

So my brother said in front of the guests and family: I dont like it,,,,,,and he repeated 3 times,,,,, and after that he said: I prefer the cebiche that people sell over the road in the corner. That really made me very very angry, I couldnt be more patient and i told him: if u dont like it u dont have to eat it, but be polite during the lunch.

regards

Gus
post #23 of 69
This never fails to irritate me everytime. I will have a guest ask me if a dish is good. I always feel like responding wiht a "no , it is utter cr__. That is why I made it"
My life, my choice.....
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My life, my choice.....
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post #24 of 69
Getting a little off-topic with this, but . . . If by "professional kitchen" you mean one that puts out food for people to eat directly (either on premises or to take out to eat elsewhere, as is or doing some cooking themselves) -- that covers a lot of territory (institutions, manufacturers, caterers, prepared foods for stores, among others) -- even so I have to say yes. Someone new here just asked about research chefs/culinologists. They need the food knowledge that chefs in a "professional kitchen" need, and other skills and knowledge as well. I would even consider people who develop recipes for publications to be chefs.

But to get back on topic: the worst offenses in my book have already been mentioned:
  1. Salting without first tasting
  2. Telling how it "should be done" differently
  3. Refusing to taste something because you "don't like it" even though you've never had it.
:mad:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #25 of 69
LOL!!

You just described my frustrations each time I cook for my in-laws. Grrrrrr!
post #26 of 69

A F & B manager that doesn't know what they're doing.

Culinary art and food is my passion.

When I was working for the Resort near Yellowstone, I would get glowing compliments from everyone in the kitchen about my pastries and bakery items. A lot of my items wouldn't make it to the floor for dinner because of the Line Cooks and the wait staff was constantly bugging me to do taste tests.

The F&B manager, who I had replaced because they "promoted" her, was rarely around during my work week BUT on the days she was somehow she FORGOT that I had been single-handedly running the bakery, including making up to 7 pans of homemade bread every day, and seemed to think I didn't have a clue and needed to micro-manage me. I got complaints about "working too much", like if I didn't clock out EXACTLY at my pre-determined end of work day hour!

For instance, she determined that we needed another p/t bakery 'help' for two days a week. I was just fine without her. Personally, the p/t help was nice BUT she couldn't follow a recipe to save her life and I kept getting the heat from this same F&B "manager" for her screw-ups. I spent MORE hours fixing her mistakes and I got heat when I was trying to FIX them. Like a pan of over-proofed hard rolls for a function that pretty much deflated when you touched them. She complained to ME about waste when I re-proofed another pan to replace them! I got fed up and just stopped trying to fix her problems and bad products went out to the floor. THEN she had the nerve to tell me that the p/t worker and I were no different. Oh, THERE'S good management skills right there!

At that point she had hired someone to do the cakes and function pastries during the really slow winter season that had "Restaurant Management" experience. I had been hired on for the wedding cakes and catering. This was after using all of my ideas for functions during the summer when I was the ONLY BAKER THERE most of the time.

I will not be used. That's when I quit.

AAAARGH!
We need an icon with a mallet beating something up!
post #27 of 69

Oh my god!!!

I read through the availble responses and I concure with them all. However, I don't believe anyone mentioned the following:
1. Customers coming in five minutes before closing the f' ing kitchen.
2. A server "instructing" me in the "culinary" preferences of his/her customer. We have a menu...order from it!
3. When a chef from another restaurant walks in and sits at my bar ordering drinks still wearing his f'ing chef coat. Ever heard of street clothes? Or are you too fat for them anymore?
4. People in the buisness that still have no problem undertipping my staff.
5. Chefs that don't recognize their cooks. You got cook that can spin pies better than you? That can basically cook you under the table? B*tches recognize!
post #28 of 69
I resent chefs and cooks who salt everything heavily in the cooking process claiming that it must be salted to taste good. There are plenty of other flavors and ways to make a dish taste good without resorting to salt before even trying the dish. Salt can always be added, it cannot be taken out of a dish.
post #29 of 69
i think we have diverged from insults to pet peeves. certainly there are a million things that cooks dont like, but how many of them are insults? the worst insult is being called a shoemaker by another cook, be it accidental or straight to your face. i can think of nothing else that is worse.

E
post #30 of 69
I often make cakes and things for family and friends at work and I agree with some of the statements about "did you make this!" I want to tell them so bad, no my cat made it!
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