or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New To Everything

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Can anybody give me some information on like coarses you need to take in highschool, in order to get scolorships or actually be able to get into a Culinary school like VCC or Debrulle?

Im 16 and all my life I've wanted to become a chef, and I want to start early on like programs and coarses I should take while im still in highschool. Does anyone have any reccomendations for coarses to take?

And is there anything major I need from highschool to get into one of these places? Like right now my school kind of sucks because the only 2 coarses they offer are FoodStudies 8-12 and Tourism 11-12. They dont have a Cafeteria Coarse or a Chef Program. Will those 2 coarses be enough?


Thanks for your help
Rob
Reply
Rob
Reply
post #2 of 13
I love your passion for this field. It's a great thing.

I'm not sure that High School can offer you anything that would be of tremendous benefit in the way of courses they might offer. Cheftomlin is right,get a job - any job - in a kitchen and work hard. When you get to cooking school you will have 2 distict advantages; one is the experience for its own sake and the other is knowing that you really want to work in this environment.

I work at the CCA in San Francisco and I'm amazed at the number of students who pay a lot of money to be here without any idea of what they are getting into. They see Jaques Pepin on TV and think, That's cool. I can do that. Only to find that it's a lot of hard work and not the least bit glamorous.

If I were to suggest one thing while you are still in school it would be to pay attention in math class. Not that you need to be a math whiz or anything but it does feature a lot in cooking and even more in baking. Not being stumped on how to convert a recipe from Kg to Lbs interpret a baker's formula will get you through a class/shift with less anxiety.

Good luck

Jock
post #3 of 13
My first question would be, what in the world do you hope to accomplish? I don't mean that in a negative way, but rather, what are your long term and short term goals and, oh, why the H*ll have you chosen this industry at such a young age? 16 is old enough to work, so get a job at a local eatery slinging pizzas or whatever they offer you just to get you foot in the door. Washing dishes is no dishonor if that's the first gig you get. We've all done it. It par for the course, lad. Next, SAVE YOUR MONEY!!!!!! You've got three more years to go? ASk your school counselors about vocational schools in your area that offer culinary education. I was just at a show here in Columbus, OH and there was a demo of highschool level culinary competition. Great place to focus while still young, but I can't emphasize enough the importance of moving up in a kitchen with little or no culinary background. It's primal, but it's THE best education you can get and you'll get paid! That's my experience. I'm 35 and just began the hospitality management course at Columbus State. Prior to that, I've held many chef positions in several kitchens by my experience and love for the buisness. I just want my paper certifications as now I have started my own buisness. It's a long strange trip, little dude, but if you love what you do, you never work a day in your life! Godspeed.
post #4 of 13
While you're in high school, focus on your academics -- English, math, science, history, foreign languages, social sciences -- because those are the basis of everything else you will ever need in the kitchen. This may seem silly to you now, but in 10 years when you have to deal with suppliers and contractors and lawyers while you work to open your own restaurant ;) you'll wish you didn't have to rely on other people to explain things to you.

Besides, there is so much more to being a chef than just knowing how to cook. If you look around here at what the REAL chefs say, you'll see that they need to do things that require all that academic stuff, sometimes even more than they cook.

So, take all your academic courses in school, and as the others have said, get a part-time/afterschool job in the best restaurant you can find. Between those two, you'll make a great start. :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
I realize what you guys are saying, but I have great passion for this job, and I love to cook at home. I can see that it takes hard work but I think im up for the challenge.
Rob
Reply
Rob
Reply
post #6 of 13
Hey nice you started this post thing...i had the same sort of questions...because I am 15. I'm homeschooled though...but it's good to know which subjects would be a good thing in the future.
"This magic moment, while your lips are close to mine, Will last forever, Forever till the end of time"



"Dream as if you'll live f o r e v e r, Live as if you'll die today"
-James Deanand...."Dream as if you'll eat f o r e v e r, Eat as if you'll die today"=D=D
Reply
"This magic moment, while your lips are close to mine, Will last forever, Forever till the end of time"



"Dream as if you'll live f o r e v e r, Live as if you'll die today"
-James Deanand...."Dream as if you'll eat f o r e v e r, Eat as if you'll die today"=D=D
Reply
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Ok Well thanks guys, i really appreciate everything.
Rob
Reply
Rob
Reply
post #8 of 13
Hi there,

I would agree with everyone else, get into the biz, learn everything you can in school esp math (I wish I had done that!). Also, I find readind culinary rags a great way to pick up idea's and for inspiration. Check out
http://www.winespectator.com/Wine/Fr...,2613,,00.html
though you may need a parent to sign up for you, it's free! :-D

Good luck amigo :smoking:
post #9 of 13
There's a program here in France called 'Stages d'observation' where we have schoolkids of 15/16 years of age come to spend a week or two in restaurant kitchens. Depending on their keeness and ability we get them washing dishes and cleaning vegetables, making basic starters, spreading stuff on croutons. This last week we had a 15-year-old girl who was tremendous, really keen and active and looking for stuff to do and help all the time; she spent yesterday cleaning pigs' intestines (for boudin), making caviar d'aubergines and peeling veg, making a creme patissiere with me and timing souffles in the oven. Approach your local restaurants and see if they offer anything like that.
Also you really, really need to concentrate on the 3 Rs - Reading Riting and 'Rithmetic. You'll never calculate a menu price or write a description without the basics, and reading recipe books and anything you can find about cooking - including the old classics - will be time well spent now. Read the McGee forum here and get his book.

--

Chris Ward
 
http://eatsleepcookschool.wordpress.com - The true story of the year I spent learning how to be a professional cook at catering school in Avignon, Provence, while working as a dishwasher.
Reply

--

Chris Ward
 
http://eatsleepcookschool.wordpress.com - The true story of the year I spent learning how to be a professional cook at catering school in Avignon, Provence, while working as a dishwasher.
Reply
post #10 of 13
No reason why you can't contact VCC and ask them about the courses and requirements. Really think long and hard about DuBrulle or Pacific Culinary, clothes don't make a man, and schools don't make a "Chef".

Focus on getting the most out of your highschool now, believe it or not, all that stuff you learn now will come in handy, especially if you want to make the jump from cook to Chef or something else food related a few years down the road.

Get a job washing dishes, preppping, at a restaurant. You'll learn lots, and when you do go to cooking school, you'll be ahead of the game with other students who don't have that kind of experience.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #11 of 13

Thanks!

Hi! Im a hopeful chef also, and the tips have been great! I was just wondering if anyone had tips specific to the career/education of pastry chef? Any tips at all would be helpful, thank you so much!
Kate
Reply
Kate
Reply
post #12 of 13
Futurechef,
chemistry would be helpful for baking. math for conversions and percentages, many formulas are really based on percentages of ingredients.
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #13 of 13

Thanks!

Thanks for the tips Panini!
Kate
Reply
Kate
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home