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Turkey Soup Too Greasy?..

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I made a turkey soup by boiling the carcass of a turkey then using the resulting stock in which to boil some vegetables. While the soup tastes good, when I put the pan of soup in the refrigerator the liquid becomes "gelatinous" (a spoon'll pretty much stand up in it). :crazy: Of course, when it's heated, it becomes liquid.

Is this because there's too much fat in the stock and I should water it down? Heaven knows, the last thing I need is to be drinking liquid fat!

Thanks.
post #2 of 10
No worries, you hit the nail on the head with the word gelatinous. Assuming you didn't use the skin, your soup should be virtually fat free. What you are getting is the collagen from the bones and cartilage from the turkey. In fact it's actually healthy for you. It helps the collagen in your own bones and joints.
Don't worry, and enjoy it!
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My latest musical venture!
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http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #3 of 10
Yes, the collagen, which denatures into gelatin, is a protein, not fat.

Mark
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Salad is the kind of food that real food eats.
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Most of the skin my teenage daughter ate (with a little assistance from me). However, there was some skin on the wings and maybe a leg, and perhaps the underside of the turkey, which were boiled in the stock-making. I guess that will increase the fat content, yes?

Is there any way for me to determine (measure) what the fat content of the soup is?

Thanks again.
post #5 of 10
The fat would still be on top when cold, Whitish and brittle, as opposed to jiggly. Sounds to me like you have a great, and healthy, soup.

Tony
post #6 of 10
Yes, if there's no white fat on top when the soup is cold, you have essentially fat-free soup. The amount remaining would be insignificant.

Someone taught me a trick: use a plastic bag filled with ice cubes to lift off fat from the surface of hot soup. Rinse the outside of the bag in warm water (wipe if necessary) and repeat a few times. It won't take off every molecule, but it will do a creditable job. I tried it recently.
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post #7 of 10
Nice tip! Would also help to get stock cool enough to refrigerate sooner.
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just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
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post #8 of 10
Generally speaking when I am making chix or turkey stock at home I usually end up with about a gallon to a gallon and a half. I pour this into small bowls (rice bowls actually) where it cools pretty quickly and can go in the fridge within an hour. I keep saying I will get a chill stick but I never do.

Jock
post #9 of 10
I occasionally brew beer at home. It's vitally important to cool the wort as quickly as possible after brewing. They make a thin copper coil with hose or faucett attachment on it. you put the coil in the wort and run water through it. works great to quickly cool the wort. I use it at home to cool stocks too. Cheap, quick, easy.

Tony
post #10 of 10

I personally think entire poultry entities with skin enhances the flavor...

...but it does add a ton more fat. I like roasting the parts first and it renders a lot of the fat out at the outset. When you simmer a fatty thing for ages you can actually see the fat layer since it floats. It's the clear layer on top. Same principle as a wave globe that you'd find at a novelty shop. When you chill the whole mess it forms a firm lardy layer on top that you can remove easily. The gelatin underneith is the nice stock stuff.

I do think that a little fat adds a little more flavor to a soup.

You could freeze a water filled small plastic soda bottle to remove all of the fat if you really wanted to. Sort of like a mini version of the large quick chills for soup stocks. The stock would have to be lukewarm and not hot or it would defeat the purpose.

April
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