or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Demi glace Base?? - Page 2

post #31 of 43
I am not classically trained from a school either but your right if I had the money I would have or still would if I had the chance but I dont I am a lifer in this buisness and yes a graduate of hard knocks myself. It is not just your post, I just noticed a lot of ill feelings on these boards which kinda caught me off gaurd and kinda bummed me out cuz I love to hang in places like this in my little free time that I have!
post #32 of 43
I certainly don't have it out for culinary students or grads, but in my experience i've worked with very few who had a good attitude or overall knowledge. Most of which couldn't cook themselves out of a paper bag. I wish schools would teach more about the production end of the business, not just how things were done a hundred years ago. Anyway, I think some of them think when they're done they're like "wow, I'm a chef now" and are abruptly put in their place. It is not some fantasyTVfoodnetworkland, which is why many never make it and opt for another career in the long run. My advice would be to get a business degree first, so they have something to fall back on.

Peace,

Chef Mike
post #33 of 43
Hey chefbk! If yer out there today I sent ya a recipe that worked for me once. I came up with it when the Owners of the place I was the Exec at said to drop labor or find a new job. I have no problem with following tradition but bills do have to be paid. Since my name wasn't anywhere on the ownership of the operation well... Some Execs are still just employees. "Suck is life" I guess. Tweek it as necessary. :D

Later and good luck.
post #34 of 43
Iron cheffin'06...YOU ROCK!!! This buisness is not for the weak or lazy...PERIOD!!! You want a real veal STOCK YOU WILL ENVENTIALLY TURN INTO A TRUE DEMI??? BUY THE BONES!!!

Mod's note: Edited for relevance and brevity
post #35 of 43
no reeally tell us how you really feel jollyroger! So all this fus on doing it the right way yet none of the sesoned experts has shared their secret recipe for demi ?????
post #36 of 43
dude, i thought you got the boot once already....

Mod's note: irrelevant section of quote removed
post #37 of 43
the secret is...there ain't no secret ;).
post #38 of 43
Hey Jolly,

A civil keyboard would be appreciated I'm sure by all. If you're "all that" what exactly is you position at the moment and how long have you been at this profession? Have you ever been in the situation that chefbk is currently in? I have to say there are a good many jobs out there that ARE NOT worth loosing over a principle especially one that isn't illegal and won't cause harm to the general public or self. I have lost jobs on principle in the past unfortunately now with a family I would never want to put them in that position.

Not starting a war with you but man take a step back from the ledge and pull your finger off the trigger.:D
post #39 of 43
Thought I'd resurect this thread to ask a question. I'm a private chef who cooks for a family and I've been using Bonewerks Demi Glace Classic. Now I see they offer a more expensive, by $35, Premium Glace/Demi Elite. Does anyone use the Elite? If so, is the extra cost worth it? Thanks.
post #40 of 43

Demi Glace Update

I thought I'd revive this thread to ask a current question. I'm a private chef and I've been using Bonewerks Demi Glace Classic. I recently noticed a new Bonewerks product - Premium Glace/Demi Elite. Is anyone using this and if so, is it worth the extra green, $35? Thanks.
post #41 of 43
I have tasted supposed demi from some places, where they would have been better off using a quality base. Every place is different re . the use of bases. Every situation is different. One must be adaptable to all.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #42 of 43
I am just finishing my break and took a good hard look at this thread. I have taken alot of good info from what to do and what not do it.

As for the difference of opinions, a question was asked, everyone is entitled to their opinion. We are here to learn from each other. When I give an opinion , its just that, an opinion.

There is no such thing as "a wrong opinion". Everyone has a different take on doing things.
I am glad to be here and to learn .... wheather it be a student, a home cook, a line cook or a chef, learning never stops.

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(162 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #43 of 43
I'm not personally familiar with the product, and can only offer the casual observation that the only way to know for sure is to try it.

As someone who used to cater smallish events, which overlaps a "private chef's" duties, it might be worth your while to make a few quarts of demi-glace every so often and freeze them. Home made demi beats bases by a considerable margin. But if you don't have the time and/or space, you don't. It's not worth killing yourself over, especially if you're using the commercial demi as a sauce component in a compound sauce rather than as the sauce itself.

Finally, to resurrect an old argument, demi-glace is always made from an Espagnole. A straight reduction is just that, a straight reduction. In terms of classic sauce preparation, straight stocks are most economically and efficiently used by reducing to the glace stage, then reconstituting from there. That's the best way to manage their intensity. A demi on the other hand, has a lot going on besides "essence of meat," and too much reduction alters it. And that brings us back to the main reason that home made demis are better than commercial bases.

BDL
_________________________

Ex owner operator of Predominantly French catering, ex cook at a couple of good joints
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking