or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › making fried rice brown
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

making fried rice brown

post #1 of 75
Thread Starter 
Hi everybody,
I'm a newbie here. In my house I'm the 'sou chef' to my wife, although I often come up with new ideas and take liberties with recipes.
As far as Chinese food goes, I make a good hot and sour soup. However, one recipe I've never been able to make the way it is prepared in Chinese take-out (or, as the British say, take-away) is fried rice. I am never able to get the dark brown appearance, even though I use plenty of soy sauce. The white of the rice still shows through. I once used annatto, but that didn't seem to work either. I wonder if it is the reddish pork that usually comes with the fried rice that gives it the color I so like. I'm beginning to suspect that the take-out places use a food dye. :-)

I hope someone can help me out.
Gianni

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 75
Have you tried adding fish sauce?Or turmeric or maybe curry powder?
post #3 of 75
You can use dark thick soy sauce, although, not all fried rice is brown. Some forego the soy sauce altogether.
post #4 of 75
do you chill your rice first or do you fry it right after steaming or boiling it...?
post #5 of 75
cold rice, ample fat, high heat, a little soy = brown rice.
post #6 of 75
Thread Starter 
Thanks, all, for your suggestions.
Gianni
post #7 of 75

brown rice

hi,

Well the question is, what is brown, dark brown, light brown. The traditional way is adding a light soy sauce (depending the region and the fried rice). The pork could have an influence, as the traditional chinese BBQ pork was glazed with honey or sugar in the final stage and the fat does disolve some of the color.

regards
post #8 of 75
Thread Starter 
Hi SushiGaijin,

Can you be more specific about the kind of fat. I imagine you mean peanut oil or some such, but I'd like to be sure you don't mean Crisco. (When I was a kid we had a friend that we called Crisco, because he was fat in the can.) :-)

As Yan from "Yan Can Cook" says,

Gaijin
post #9 of 75
Its usually the dark soy sauce (mushroom soy sauce as its sometimes called). Its usually less in sodium content and we usually mix the light (salt-substitute) and dark (color) and add it to the rice for a more uniform color. (usually mixed in equal amounts)

if you see a hole-in-the-wall type of place making fried rice, the ingredient that they keep adding on a regular basis while continuously stirring is dark soy sauce / mushroom soy sauce.
post #10 of 75
Thread Starter 
Thanks very much for your reply. I just went out to buy the dark soy sauce. I went only to one shop and I didn't find it, but I did get a barbecue sauce which is thick and black like roofing sealant. The first ingredient is sugar, the third is soy.
I have the rice boiling right now. We use my wife's method of boiling rice in lots and lots of water, not just enough so the water covers "the first joint of a finger". It comes out very fluffy. Of course, there is no "singing rice" stuck to the bottom of the pot. I guess my wife figured that if lots of water works for pasta it should also work for rice.
post #11 of 75
This is the method favored by Sarah Moulton, too.

I wonder if bead molasses is what turns the rice brown. It wouldn't add saltiness to the rice but would make it dark brown and somewhat sweet.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #12 of 75

hi

hi,

this type of soy sauce is commonly used by the Japanese, when they make their fried rice and it is darker. however when refering to chinese fried rice in general, especially in the cantonese cuisine the rice is not dark brown. Well at least back here in Asia. Will post a recipe, when i am back form work.

regards have a nice day
post #13 of 75
In addition to the Soy some Hoisin sauce helps. I don't cook Chinese much but I do like fried rice.

I've also added Worcestershire, more for flavor than browning but contributes to both. As I type this I'm wondering about Worcestershire and molasses in addition to the soy. Certainly not ethnically authentic but...
just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
Reply
just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
Reply
post #14 of 75
Some of the colour will come from the wok, the rest will come from either dark soy or oyster sauce and add near the end of cooking. Besides, fried rice shouldn't be dark dark brown but very light brown. If you want that dark brown colour, I recommend you steam your rice with a little soy sauce and add oyster sauce when making fried rice. Should help a little.
post #15 of 75
Thread Starter 
I made the rice yesterday. For the amount of rice I used I put too much oil in the pan and I also used too much of the barbecue sauce. It certainly came out much darker than what I had hoped for. It tasted too greasy while it was hot, but my wife liked it a lot after it had cooled off.

I'm going to experiment by steaming the rice, that is using a minimal amount of water, and add the barbecue sauce during the simmering process.
post #16 of 75
The rice needs to be more than just chilled/cold. It should be refrigerated overnight.

The starch in rice takes time in the fridge to retrograde for the proper consistency of fried rice.

Steam the rice, let it cool, refrigerate overnight.

Besides refrigerating the rice, you'll want to track down a good recipe for char siu pork. Fried rice just isn't fried rice without it.
post #17 of 75
hi,

As promissed, a base recipe the way we cook it out here in Asian. The method is stir - fried.


Ingredients
Specifications
Units
Quantity
Cooked Rice
Cold
Kg
1.000
Chinese Sausage
Sliced small, blanched
Kg
0.250
Green Peas
Frozen, blanch before using
Kg
0.200
Lettuce
Iceberg, washed and dried
Kg
0.100
Shrimp
Washed & de-veined
Kg
0.150
Soy Sauce
Dark soy sauce
Ml
40
White pepper
Ground
Kg
0.005
Eggs
Fresh, approx. 50 grams per piece
Pcs
5
Spring Onion
Washed, finely chopped
Kg
0.100
Garlic
Peeled, chopped
Kg
0.030
Oil
Corn oil
Ml
50
Salt
Iodized
Kg
0.005


Method:
· Using a Chinese wok, heat the oil.
· Add garlic and sauté.
· Add the beaten eggs, stirring well. Add the shrimps.
· Add the Chinese sausage and stir well. (or BBQ pork)
· Add the cooked rice into the wok.
· Add the green peas, lettuce, salt and white pepper.
Add the soy sauce and the spring onions. Stir well to evenly distribute the ingredients

you need high heat for this preparation.

note: BBQ sauce is not the right ingredient. Also i saw someone recommending Hoisin sauce. Hoisin sauce is served in the chinese for cold roasted appetizers, or when serving pekin duck etc.

regards and good luck
post #18 of 75
Dark soy sauce might just be the thing you are looking for. :chef:
But did you use 'overnight' rice? And fry the egg first?
post #19 of 75
Thread Starter 
I made steamed rice in the pressure cooker today. That's where you put the rice and water in a small bowl and place that in the pressure cooker with a cup of water. I added one teaspoon of barbecue sauce during the cooking which resulted in a very nice brown color and a slightly 'smoked' flavor. It was convenient in that it takes only a few minutes and there is no need to refrigerate the rice before frying it. Of course a true fried rice should include roasted pork.
Gianni
post #20 of 75

Fried Rice done right

I read through all of the exsisting posts up to this point and most of the suggestions revolved around some kind of sauce to bring the "brown" color our friend asked about. The "brown" that you seek comes from method, and not your sauce of choice entirely. Fried rice came from where most things we Westerners think is great...Leftovers! Here's a great tip: Cook off two cups of rice, after you have rinsed it in cold water thoroughly, Chineese style (rice equal proportion to water). It should be sticky, but not starchy-gooey. Lay it out flat and cool it down fast. Allow it to dry out under refigeration. This is key...it must dry out! Now, when you go through your steps to prepare it, your rice will perform. Don't use so much oil and cook over high heat. Stir-fry is fast, hot cooking and it doesn't take much time if your mise en plas are in front of you.
post #21 of 75
When you stir in the soy sauce in the wok you need to do it gradually to get that overall even effect. Otherwise they'll be blothes and the whiteness comes through.
post #22 of 75
have you tried frying it in butter and adding seasoning salt
post #23 of 75

Hmmm... I see no one mentioned the way I make my rice brown, so I'll just throw in my two cents. I can't remember where I got this idea, but it works for me.  I use a few beads of blackstrap molasses!

post #24 of 75

Talk about fusion cooking Lisie...Far east meets deep south...Be interesting to know what else you have going on in there. 

 

Welcome to chef talk by the way. You'll like it here

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
post #25 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisiePooh View Post

Hmmm... I see no one mentioned the way I make my rice brown, so I'll just throw in my two cents. I can't remember where I got this idea, but it works for me.  I use a few beads of blackstrap molasses!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bughut View Post

Talk about fusion cooking Lisie...Far east meets deep south...Be interesting to know what else you have going on in there. 

 

Welcome to chef talk by the way. You'll like it here

 

 

Actually it's not so much fusion as substitution.

 

If you don't have kecap-manis (thick sweet soy) you can approximate it by adding molasses to regular soy-sauce.

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply

----

 


"Plus, this method makes you look like a complete lunatic. If you care about that sort of thing".  - Dave Arnold

 

Reply
post #26 of 75

Thanks, Bughut! I have been joyfully following so many posts since joining; this is a treasure trove of ideas! I'd have to agree with MichaelGA; I do a lot of substituting or creative cooking due to the fact that I live in Vermont where a lot of the ingredients simply aren't available. I think that has been the biggest impetus in my learning to cook. If it takes an hour round trip to pick up tortillas at the market... time to learn how to make them yourself!

post #27 of 75

Use a Wok. I worked for years with 3 good Chinese chefs. They made a light fried rice (slightly yellowish) and a darker one.  Believe it or not they put a shot of Gravy master in it to achieve good color.

CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #28 of 75

I am an avid watcher of The Mind of a Chef, with Anthony Bourdain. This show has a lot of excellent cooks/minds on here and one idea came to memory when I read your post about the pork. You might have to look up the show, but, I believe someone used Hawaiian Punch and Strawberry Mentos, put them into a small pot and boiled until the candy was dissolved. The chef's name that did this is David Chang.

post #29 of 75

Sushi Gaijin is right.

post #30 of 75

I know this is an old thread, but there seems to be a little renewed interest, so I thought I'd share my method since no one has shared a complete method yet, or talked about a couple of the most important ingredients to fried rice, specifically, the type of oil.

 

Fried rice just isn't the same if you don't use the right oil in my opinion. You need either cottonseed oil (preferred by me) or soy oil, or some combination of the two. They are easy to find if you go to an Asian food store. As already mentioned, you need your rice already cooled, which will also dry it out some too. A wok is great. I use a skillet most the time because I cook in people's homes and most of them don't have a wok, or gas burners. I usually use a 10 or 12 inch non-stick skillet, or an aluminum pan pretreated with oil. I preheat on medium, then turn the skillet up to high just before adding ingredients. First in is the oil. Next is the rice. Most of the browning comes from cooking the rice in the oil. I don't add anything else until the rice is good and hot if this is a "side dish" fried rice. Next, I scoot aside some of the rice and drop down some butter then some chopped garlic. The butter will assist in the browning. Now, on top of the rice, I sprinkle sesame seeds, soy sauce, a little salt and pepper, and sesame oil. Then I toss to distribute and check my oil level. If the rice is sticking to the pan, I might add some more cottonseed oil. Letting the rice sit for a period between stirring or tossing will help to brown it. Both the butter and sesame oil have low flash points so they will assist in browning. I don't really care how "brown" my rice is as a whole, what I am looking for is a good amount of caramelization on the rice, for flavor. The browning is a side effect of the caramelizing, not the goal. When the rice is properly caramelized, I add chopped parsley and toss, then serve.

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply

Brandon O'Dell

 

Friend That Cooks Home Chef Service

www.friendthatcooks.com

O'Dell Restaurant Consulting

www.bodellconsulting.com

 

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking

Gear mentioned in this thread:

ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › making fried rice brown