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making fried rice brown - Page 3

post #61 of 75

The best Roast Pork Fried Rice is dark brown in color, with of course roast pork cubes, small green onion pieces, white onion squares, a few bean sprouts, and little pieces of yellow egg.  I have yet to find another Chinese restaurant that makes it correctly.  The old man retired and closed his down, and I can't find any more like it.  When you find yellow or light colored fried rice?  It does not have the full flavor it should be and is bland.  Only those rare places that use all the ingredients above and make it dark brown are making it proper.  And don't forget - No peas!  Peas or carrots do not belong in Chinese Fried rice!  If anyone here knows of a place on Long Island that makes the fried rice I described?  Please let me know... Thanks.

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post #62 of 75

making it proper? There's a huge variety of fried rice dishes, not one recipe that rules them all. 

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post #63 of 75

Yes you are correct.  I understand there is shrimp fried rice, chicken fried rice, house special fried rice, etc.  I was only referring to roast pork fried rice.  And there is only one correct way to make this dish properly.  I gave the old school traditional version which I consider the best tasting, most flavorful version and somewhat most costly.

 

Many Chinese restaurants today cut corners to save money.  They eliminate the egg, the bean sprouts and use inferior less expensive soy sauces, none at all or add cheap peas and carrots as fillers that should not be in it.  Since Chinese food in general is an art and calculated science to get just the right melded flavoring and aromas.... You can easily and drastically change the flavor significantly by not following the tried and true methods.  This is why it is so difficult to make many Chinese dishes at home.  You need the vast amounts of different powders, liquids, and ingredients not to mention the 800 degree oxygen aided gas stoves and large woks to make it perfect.  Something most of us do not have at our disposal, let alone the years of training it requires.

 

So my search continues where I live to find a Take Out place that makes my beloved roast pork fried rice correctly.

post #64 of 75

Um, "correct" may not be the most accurate word, perhaps "to my  particular taste" would be a better suited term?

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post #65 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Supertaster View Post
 

...Many Chinese restaurants today cut corners to save money.  They eliminate the egg, the bean sprouts and use inferior less expensive soy sauces, none at all or add ...

Supertaster:  what would you consider as a good or excellent brand of soy sauce?

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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post #66 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Supertaster:  what would you consider as a good or excellent brand of soy sauce?

 

Koon Chun brand Black Soy and even the Double Black and Lee Kum Kee soy sauces.  I would avoid the supermarket chain brands like La Choy and the like.  Stay away from soy sauce made from hydrolyzed soy protein and caramel color.  The brands you find in a Chinese market are appropriate.  This is where you find authenticity.  Now there is an exception to this rule.  La Choy brand Teriyaki sauce in the glass bottle with the purple band is exquisite.  If anyone wants a teriyaki.., you will be hard pressed to find a more flavorful one.  And the Japanese brand called Gyoza dipping sauce is wonderful on dumplings.  It is similar to the brown dumpling sauce from the Chinese restaurants...


Edited by Supertaster - 10/17/13 at 12:55pm
post #67 of 75

Presently I have some Kwong Hung Seng Sauce with a dragonfly printed on the front label.  On the back label I see "White Soy Sauce" printed and it's a product of Thailand.  I purchased it from a Korean market here in south Georgia.



The ingredients as printed on the backside label are as follows:

SOYBEAN 62%, RICE FLOUR 20%, SALT 10%, WATER 8%

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #68 of 75

I like all Kikoman products. Ponzu,Hoisen, Soy,Teriaki etc all are good and most consistant every time.

Chef EdB
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      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #69 of 75

I'm not sure but imho Kikkoman Soy Sauce seems watered down these days.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #70 of 75

I do not  find that it is watered down, plus it is one of the few that is brewed. When I make a recipe from years ago again today it still comes out and taste the same.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #71 of 75

Fried rice with salted fish is a classic recipe which you can get in most Chinese restaurants.

 

 

dcarch

post #72 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post
 

I do not  find that it is watered down, plus it is one of the few that is brewed. When I make a recipe from years ago again today it still comes out and taste the same.


Alas I might be suffering from taste bud burnout! 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #73 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

Presently I have some Kwong Hung Seng Sauce with a dragonfly printed on the front label.  On the back label I see "White Soy Sauce" printed and it's a product of Thailand.  I purchased it from a Korean market here in south Georgia.



The ingredients as printed on the backside label are as follows:

SOYBEAN 62%, RICE FLOUR 20%, SALT 10%, WATER 8%


That is fine.  I'm sure it tastes great. It's an authentic version as well.

post #74 of 75

I think you should use dark thick soya sauce for your brown rice.

post #75 of 75

Hi Gianni

Another alternative is to use Maggi Liquid Seasoning together with your soy sauce and a dash of sesame oil. Also brown rice is sometimes nice fried too which is a healthier option too.

I was also thinking you could add a touch of Kecap manis to the veges and rice for an Indonesian touch like they would use in say a Nasi Goreng!

 

Happy Cooking! :beer:

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