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Congee/Jook

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I've been experimenting with breakfast foods and am now to Congee. Often, this dish includes a rather long simmer time, so I decided to start out with a slow cooker version so it could cook on low all night and I would have it ready to go shortly after I got up.

I expected the rice to dissolve mostly. I've never made it before and was assuming it would behave like Martin Yan's that was on the liquid side. Mine was more like a very expanded and THICK oatmeal this AM. It had absorbed practically all the liquid. I added some more liquid and some chicken to finish cooking for breakfast.

Samples tasted OK. We'll see how the kids do with it.

What are your recipes and preferences for congee?

Phil
post #2 of 12
I do mine the quick way. Leftover rice, lots of water, bring it up to boil, use a stick blender. :) Scoop it up and finish with scallions, thin julienne ginger, touch of sesame oil.

I like to eat mine with scrambled eggs and soy sauce, pickled sweet/hot anchovies, pickled tofu, kimchee.
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
I thought it was worth keeping in the repetoire, but the kids nixed it big time. The quick method you mention sounds reasonable.

Phil
post #4 of 12
It's not congee (which I adore) but when I was young and poor I made ramen noodles for breakfast. A dash of sesame oil and soy and a squirt of hot sauce, and the day was off to a great start!

Kuan, I like the idea of using a stick blender. Do you put the kimcheee, etc. in the bowl with the congee?
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post #5 of 12
My MIL makes jook all the time. I should ask her how she does it but I know it doesn't take long. it's generally a pretty simple preparation with bits of shredded chicken or pork and always the scallions on top.

Jock
post #6 of 12
My grandmother use to make it plain with those tofu sheets and these soft nut like things (sorry, I have no idea what they are). Oh man, no soy sauce is even needed, it was soooo awsome but I can't share since all her recipes was in her head and its all gone now since her passing.

I know you boil jasmin rice for a long period of time with excess water (more like a 3:1 ratio) over low heat. Very little salt should be needed though. I love kuan's idea with the leftover rice and blender, I should give that a try one day.

Another thing I love my grandmother for was when she use to put pork bones in with the jook, sometimes she even adds the hock from a roast pig which was practically being thrown away back in the day.
post #7 of 12
Your grandmother sounds Cantonese.

The "soft nut like things" are ginko nuts. You can find them in cans at Asian Stores and they are commonly called "white nuts" on the can.

There are as many recipes for Jook as there are people that make it. Jook/Congee is traditionally make from rice left over from dinner the night before. If starting with uncooked rice is easiest to put one cup of uncooked rice in a large crockpot, add meat like pork shoulder or whatever you like, fill the crockpot to one inch below the top of water. Bring to a boil, then turn to low and it will be ready in the morning.

Other cultures enjoy eating it with numerous condements like pickled greens, chopped nuts, hot sauces, etc.
post #8 of 12
I think my mom's jook is fantastic. Usually we use leftover rice, chicken stock, juilenne ginger, thinly sliced shitake mushrooms, green onions and a few drops of sesame oil.

The plain version is also good, it should be soupy not stiff, add a thousand year old egg, dried shredded pork or beef, or a salted egg and voila!
post #9 of 12
Oh I just eat the kimchee on the side. Sometimes I drop an egg in it and wait for it to "cook" a bit.

I also like Peking Duck "third way" Hong Kong style duck congee. :) Buy a whole crispy duck from the store, eat duck with rice for dinner, save the bones and drippings and have duck congee for breakfast the next morning. MMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm!!!! :D
post #10 of 12
There's nothing a little duck fat can't embellish! :lips:
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post #11 of 12
That sounds AWESOME!
Like all good meals, this too shall pass
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post #12 of 12
BUT this sounds even better! I wish we had more places in hampton roads where we could find Peking Duck, I only know of 2 places and the both require advanced notice to purchace it.
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