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Another Creme Burlee question

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Enjoyed learning and reading the thread about "burning creme burlee" but I have another question. We use brown sugar on ours and most recipes that I have seen use white sugar. Which one is the correct one to use or is a matter of personal preference? Thanks again!
Bill
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Bill
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post #2 of 14
it's best to use raw sugar (the kind with a brown tint to it) or you can mix white and brown sugar together
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Life's too short to eat bad food and drink bad wine.
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post #3 of 14
I find that the high molases content in brown sugar causes it to burn too easily, leaving a bitter taste.

Godfather is right, use raw or other natural sugar products that you can mix with white.

Jock
post #4 of 14
If you are going to use brown sugar, I suggest you dry it out in a low oven first. It helps with the melting.
post #5 of 14
imo, Turbinado or Demerara sugar are the best to use.
cj
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cj
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post #6 of 14
hi Jock,

what do you understand in the US under Raw Sugar, as for me, that is the sugar product before refining sugar, still containing 5% of molasses.

just for clarification and to know, if we refer to the same product with the terminology.

regards
post #7 of 14
I'm going to score this thread as another vote for me. I'm voting to move on from any type of brulee or molten chocolate cake.:talk:
The discussion is impressive and educational, but it is still based on giving a simple texture contrast, to a somewhat simple dessert.
oh, please let's not move onto smores:lol:
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #8 of 14
"let's not move onto smores" but, wouldn't it be nice to be here for those souls who would like to deep fry them????? :rolleyes:
cj
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cj
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post #9 of 14
hi,

good point, why you dont try powder sugar, maybe it goes faster!

regards
post #10 of 14
Hi

A suggestion on this issue:crazy:

Try making a hard crack caramel.....allow to cool .... powder the caramel in the robot coupe .....sprinkle over the brulee just like normal sugar.... lightly flame with torch at point of service....this gives an excellentfinish and speeds up the torching process(storing the powder in the freezer allows the powder to remain fresh and loose)

:beer:
post #11 of 14
That's a good question Chef and I'm not exactly sure of the answer. The name suggests your understanding of raw sugar but I have heard that the "raw" sugar here in the US is processed to some degree and is not truely raw. I personally think of more as demerara sugar. Plain old brown sugar has much more molases. At home, if I find myself short of a little brown sugar I will mix some molases in white sugar to make my own and I can't tell the difference from store bought.


Jock
post #12 of 14
hi Jock,

I do live today in a sugar producing country and did put some effort into the subject to understand the sugar refining process, which basically has 2 stages. When i saw raw sugar lying on the floor in one of this wear houses, ants were immediately my reaction. So i ask and the sugar producer told me, you will not find one ant in here.

The moment you refine the sugar ants are the enemy. Well just a story.

going back to the original question of the cream brulee, what about powdered sugar, can it be used?

regards
post #13 of 14
One of the main brands of demerara sugar in the united states is called "sugar in the raw". Leading some people to call it raw sugar.

So I think that's what godfather_chef alluded to in his post

Real "raw sugar" I guess is just cane or beets...
post #14 of 14
could someone elaborate on the production of sugar
from beets. I am ashamed to say I don't know much
about it. Cane and sorghum yes, but, beets no. I
have to say that I find beet sugar acts differently from
cane sugar. Especially when heated. Would be grateful
for any information. thanks
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