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In the Potato mood

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
hi,

Among chefs there is always the question and ending with an argument.

Question:

Do we cook potatoes starting with cold or boiling water?

Well maybe also an good input to all the hobby chefs on this site.

regards

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post #2 of 20
I do suppose it depends on what you will be using them for,
whether they are cut,peeled,large,or small, the type of potato,
and age of the potato.
post #3 of 20
cold water
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi Stephen,

it does not matter the cut, the question is boiled potatoes. If i roast them later yes the method will change as we blanch them first after cutting.

simply do you put a potato into cold or boiling water?

how do you do it?

regards

hans
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
cold water,

you sing right but before enjoying potatoes right in your mouth do you put then in to cold or boiling water? that was the question and maybe why? well the general public just could learn here by the way!

regards
post #6 of 20
Cold. For me it cooks the whole potato more evenly.
How about sweet potatoes?
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
stephen,

same principal with starch related ingredients.

first the cold water will get warm, so therefore slowly the starch with 40 degreegs celsious can absorb the heat and over 60 D C will swell and when 80 D C it is bound. However when you do the opposit the outer part will always be damaged and over cooked and the center well maybe just right.

regards
post #8 of 20
Chef,
When baking a potato, would it be more desirable to cook
the potato,while slowly raising the temperature, or does
the steam from the moisture in the potato permeate the
flesh cooking the potato evenly? I find a very hot oven
produces a fluffier textured potato. On another subject,
have you ever cooked potatoes in pine resin? Ate them as
a child, but, didn't know if it was a regional thing specific to
where I grew up. Asking some questions for the enjoyment of other
readers out there(like the first above)

thanks
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 
Stefan i think that should be your real name in live,

if you expose a potato in the skin to direct heat, the shell of that vegetable will burn and develop an very unpleasant burned taste, as anything which is burned and tasts bitter.

therefore our forefathers learned to protect food from fire and not being burned, as burning any food developds an bitter flavor and i believe it is cancerous.

you can use anything edible to wrape food and grill it on direct heat, well today they found alu foil as the recepies are saying soo, but this metal, is it truley the best?

regards
post #10 of 20
Chef,
when you cook the small potatoes in boiling pine resin,
the steam or water released by the potato seems to
create a barrier of hardened or tempered resin which
keeps the skin from burning. The potatoes come out of
the resin and are put into cold water causing them to crack
a little. You then crack open the potato(medium creamers
or medium reds)and with a spoon scoop out the potato. Has
flavor undertones of pine or rosemary. They do call me even
stephen. Even tempered and seemingly always at the same
speed. But, I get an enormous amount done by simply mapping
things out in my mind. We use banana leaves and wood plank,etc,
for cooking at home. Aluminum foil scares me a little. Have three
young children at home. Try to cook healthy home cooked meals
3 times a day. No sodas or premade food. Lots of fruit and sunshine
for them. Over and out!
post #11 of 20

I'll bet you take a long time to cook anything don't you?

first the cold water will get warm, so therefore slowly the starch with 40 degreegs celsious can absorb the heat and over 60 D C will swell and when 80 D C it is bound. However when you do the opposit the outer part will always be damaged and over cooked and the center well maybe just right.

(too busy remembering all the little particulars...)

April :bounce:
post #12 of 20
Whether you like the guy or not April, he is right. Potatoes should be started in cold water and brought up slowly so that it cooks evenly. Doing it any other way leaves the outside of the potato waterlogged and damaged while the inside can still be undercooked.
post #13 of 20
this is always an interview question.. along with how do you make hollandaise..

depending on how these two questions get answered i make my determination as to whether or not they will fit the roll i need filled..
post #14 of 20
OK, So the topic question has been answered, Cold water. Next.............:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #15 of 20
we're in the professional food service forum. many of us own our own culinary based businesses. I don't elaborate on basic shtuff....others on the site do. they get into the history, the principals, the temperatures, the exacting science of food.Sometimes it's fun to read, othertimes it's not. Me I cook. I write.....I only write alot when I'm paid to do it....I only press spell check when I got to.....and I've got editors that love me enough to clean up my work....
when we write at cheftalk many times it's in shorthand.....proportion/tech.
works for us. If we migrate down to the non-pro section the writing becomes a different tone, the recipes when written are spelled out.....I chose often not to participate in those...it's not fun for me. I'd have to get out the scales, measuring equipment and clock to write a recipe.

I just spoke on a panel with Monsanto seed genetisit, Wash U GMO biologist, Bon Appetit food service GM, Farm Bureau, Food Archeologist.....I have a working knowledge of various organic multicrop intensive farming practices and have taught cooking/farming/nutritional classes/camps for 8 years. Bonus I can even cook it out in the field with a flame and a pan....oil, salt, pepper are good too.

cold water works. recipes are templates created by/for those that need um....I'd rather cook with skill, knowledge and creativity....pay me enough I'll stop and write a recipe.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #16 of 20
Wow! And here I am, cooking potatoes, in their skins, without their skins, in every desired shape and form in cold water. Why? because they cook more evenly, and I can skin the scum off that forms before they come to a boil. No rocket science, no GMO guys, no food scientists, just 20 odd years of cooking trial and error.

Oh, and I dip my plastic scraper in oil and make a "cut" in my loaves and cakes befor baking to give me an even, controlled split, and when I cook broccoli, I turn off the heat and let them sit, stems in the water, crowns floating above, for even cooking. Don't know why, but it works and I don't question it, I just use it to my advantage
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #17 of 20
yep, best way to cook, pay attention to your food....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #18 of 20
I couldn't agree more, Attention all chefs :lol: :lol: :lol:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #19 of 20
C'mon guys, I thought it was a generally accepted practice that root vegetables (grown underground) should always start cooking in cold water and vegetables grown above ground should start cooking in boiling water.
post #20 of 20
You're so right Dinerminer, you beat me to the punch.
If I had been paying more attention years ago in cooking school I'd remember why. Something about the starches and colors?
It's funny that I am asked this question all the time about vegetables.
(And about hardboiling eggs too.) Most people are so happy when I tell them about the general rule you just posted. They seem relieved that they no longer have to worry about it.:confused:
Thank you.
Mmmmm, Lagosta!
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Mmmmm, Lagosta!
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