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What do you expect to see someone wearing in a job interview?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
hey everyone

Okay so heres an interesting question i was discussing with someone the other day. In her line of work if your going to for a job interview you better be wearing a dress top and either dress pants or nice skirt with no facial peircings (she works in the jewlery buisness). However i can go to the other end of the scale and say this other person i know is in contracting and if he meets someone he doesn't care if the person is wearing work cloths or not.

What do you all this is the best thing to wear to job interviews in this kind of buisness. I mean your going into a resturant where the chef is more the likely wearing his/her whites.

I personally would think a nice top and a nice clean pair of jeans

of course if your going to a high end resturant (lets say maybe the king edward hotel (the resturant inside) in toronto) u might think of skipping on the jeans and wearing a nice pair of dress pants.

What do you think the standard for going into a interview in a resturant should be?

Thanks
Candice
post #2 of 17
I wouldn't wear jeans to a job interview. Even though us cooks aren't known for our stylish wardrobes, it still makes a good impression to dress up. I would recommend wearing somthing similar to the FOH at the place you are applying. that way you aren't overdressed, but still have a professional image.
post #3 of 17
I have always worn either a suit and tie or dress pants, dress shirt and a tie. How you dress says a lot about how you care about getting the position.
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Nicko 
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post #4 of 17
This question has come up before and I really believe you have to depend on common sense.
I also believe you should not only be comfortable but look comfotable. I can tell when someone is wear ing something they don't normally feel comfortable in. If you have that one suit in the closet that hasw only been worn to your sisters wedding and is a little too small, I would leave it there and dress in something nice that is you. Personally I'm not comfortable in a suit since I have not had to wear one to work for a long time. I will opt for slacks and a nice shirt, maybe jacket if I think it's necessary. Areas are different, here it is perfectable acceptible for me to attend a foundation board meeting on a Sunday morn in nice tailored jeans and a jacket. Nice dress shirt sometimes even a starched fishing shirt.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #5 of 17
I usually wear a dress shirt and nice jeans/dress pants. I'm still quite young so I skip the full suit (wouldn't suit me, would be a little over-the-top), opting instead for a dress/casual but still professional look. Make sure my facial hair is well trimmed, head freshly shaven, etc... It definitely makes a difference going into an interview looking good. It's the difference between getting a job as a commis/demi CdP, or starting off as a full-fledged CdP or sous. Also, once you're in the door, if you maintain your professional look and attitude it will give you a better shot at quick promotions and advancement. Of course your work itself is essential, but hard work alone doesn't equal advancement (I've learned that the hard way).
post #6 of 17
I don't really look at the TYPE of clothes, but rather how they are worn. Dirty and patched? Gravy stains on the tie? Sweat-stained holes under the arms? Or like Panini says, a tight-fitting suit that you only wore to your sister's wedding last year?

What I like to see is clean clothes, clean hands, clean faces. I don't expect a cook to show up in a suit, and I don't expect a Maitre d' to show up in torn jeans and a "party till you puke" T-shirt....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #7 of 17
hmm, for me, ermengildo zegna.

Feel a million dollars, act million dollars.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #8 of 17
Ah.. heh, a suit that costs a month's salary. :)
post #9 of 17
ermenegildo zegna
Not a months pay unless you're working for Mickey D's. Gotta know where to shop:look: being Italian helps:eek: having an authorized tailor two doors down helps when you want a wool suit made of another material.
To all gentlemen out there. Find and use a small local tailor to help make a small percentage of your suits. You will feel better wearing it.. I love the whole process of having something sewn for me.:rolleyes:

"Feel a million dollars, act million dollars." boy, oh so right!! Nick. Shu
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #10 of 17

Chefware pinstripe pants...

Nice top of some sort. No, I wouldn't wear a chef coat, but something similar in the 'real world' would be nice.

Chefware pants...something that I'm comfortable in.

Hair groomed/slicked/tied, whatever you need to do to keep it out of guest's food. No excess jewelry of any kind. Maybe one simple marriage band. No nail polish/extensions. No elaborate earrings, just simple posts or rings (ONE each ear).

Presenting yourself is just common sense. What they see is what they get...not what you say you'll do.

April
post #11 of 17
You only get one chance to make a first impression. If you want to be taken seriuosly, you need to be serious. Dress the part, firm handshake, direst eye contack, and speak clearly...



Buisness Casual/Suit......no jeans. Even kahkis, button down, and a blazer work.
Like all good meals, this too shall pass
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Like all good meals, this too shall pass
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post #12 of 17
For cooks, I expect, at least business casual. No jeans, especially torn or faded, and not T-shirts.

For management and chefs of all levels I would expect a suit, dress or the equivilant.

For both I expect clean, well shaven (for men). Neat hair, clean hands and nails. Clothes pressed and clean.
post #13 of 17
Adding to what's already been said (here and on other threads):

The suggestions I make assume that you might have to walk into the kitchen and/or storage area(s) at some point of the interview, so you want to observe as much kitchen sanitation as possible. You want to show that you are serious and can handle the physical work. Except for the clothes and shoes, dress as you would at work. The higher the level of the job you are going for, the more formal your clothes should be. (That's just my opinion.) In all cases, clothes and shoes should be neat, clean, and business-like (business casual is fine). I have no problem with jeans so long as they are clean and NOT ripped. DO NOT wear your whites to the interview; but do carry them with you if you might be asked to trail immediately.

Women: short nails, no nail polish; no sandals* or spike heels. *I once made the mistake of wearing sandals to an interview. It was not a mistake that cost me the job (I got it), but when I had to walk through the production area/kitchen, I knew I was breaking a basic sanitation rule and I was very uncomfortable. Besides, my toes got covered in flour! :eek:

Men: preferably NO facial hair, but if you have it, very closely trimmed. And NOT the fashionable "unshaven" look -- that simply looks sloppy.

Both: no dangly jangly jewelry, but if you wear earring(s), just one or one pair, preferably very small rings (I don't think studs, especially multiple studs, have a place in the kitchen) and no rings other than a plain wedding band if you normally wear one. Hair constrained if it hangs loose (hairband or elastic for women, elastic for men if it's long enough to be caught in one). No overpowering cologne or perfume.


Finally: the kitchen is a serious place, and the first considerations are safety and sanitation, for the benefit of the cooks AND the customers. Show that you understand. If you balk at constraining your "free spirit" appearance in the interests of safety and sanitation, either learn fast to do it, or find another line of work.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #14 of 17
heh, yeh Zegna, didnt cost me anymore than a Brooks Bros suit i bought in 2000 in Hong Kong - go figure. The outlet shop in Hawaii is absolute magic (Brooks Bros).

Like i said before, look a million dollars, feel a million dollars - its all psychological, feel it act it and take it from there. Walk the walk, talk the talk and laugh all the way to the bank *but be prepared to come up with the goods*

Post script - if your confident enough to buy this stuff and wear it,then its no problem. Even if you have esteem issues, wear it and feel the confidence and go with the flow.

PS, also what you wear will also project the amount of respect that you give to your perspective employer - if they dont give you the job based on being over-dressed, do you really want to work there?
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #15 of 17
Hey, I thought this was a good question, especially for anyone on this site that is new to the industry. As a cook/chef, I will go to an interview in black and white checks, my clogs (after I give then a quick spit shine), A clean, never worn in action white dish tank shirt, make sure my nails are clipped and clean, facial hair trimmed (I don't usually, I have a crazy mustache and beard thing that has it's own zip code...), and bring a nice binder with paper to take notes and bring a fricken pen to write with! Did I mention socks? Wear clean ones.
post #16 of 17

Deodorant

In my opinion, anything past deodorant is a terrible mix with the smells in the kitchen. I'd dress like the average person that would be eating at the restaurant that you are walking into. At a fine dining place, I might break out a suit, at a family restaurant I'd wear the jeans.

More important to me when I was hiring was what the person smelled like. I once wanted to fire a waitress because the smell of patchuli overpowered any sauce I could hope to make. My old Sysco rep would park near the kitchen vents and I could smell his cologne before he set foot in my kitchen, also not good.

So my advice is to skip the Drakkar and stick with the Old Spice.
Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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post #17 of 17
I've interviewed hundreds of candidates for nearly every position in the business. I tell the managers who are interviewing alongside me "this is as good as it gets" when it comes to an employee.

I'm almost always looking for someone who can interact with me as a human being - laugh, smile, converse. I almost always assume that resumes are a lie or at least an exaggeration.

Be clean and presentable, whatever you choose to wear. Make eye contact and smile. If your interviewer is dull, then make conversation with them - it may get you to their boss.
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