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Scottish Morning Rolls

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Ok Guys,
I tried my hand at creating Scottish morning rolls the other day. They were supposed to come out light and fluffy. Kind of like those donuts without the cream filling. Maybe with a little more crumb though. Mine came out like hockey pucks!?? I checked the yeast date and it was ok. Also, it said that I should use fresh yeast. But, I used the packaged stuff. I used all purpose white flour, salt, water and lukewarm milk. Oh, and 2 tblsp. of milk for glazing.
The inside was a little soft but unacceptable. Where did I go wrong? Thanks.
PS: The dogs loved them.
Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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post #2 of 20
Were you trying to make scones?

I lived in Scotland for five years. I don't recall ANYTHING being called Scottish Morning Rolls. Mind you, my mind's slipping too.

Ciao,
Order In/Food Out ~ It's NOT magic.
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"It's not getting any smarter out there. You have to come to terms with stupidity, and make it work for you." Frank Zappa
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Order In/Food Out ~ It's NOT magic.
- * - * - * - * -
"It's not getting any smarter out there. You have to come to terms with stupidity, and make it work for you." Frank Zappa
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post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
Steve,
I got this from a bread book. That's what they call it. They did turn out more like scones though. More on the hockey puck side of scones.
Dale Angelo Iannello
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Dale Angelo Iannello
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post #4 of 20
The first two things I would look at are:
  1. Temperature of water used to bloom yeast
  2. When did you add the salt?

If your water is too warm, over 110, you risk killing the yeast and not getting any rise. If you do not have a thermometer, just try to get the water the right temp to fill a baby bottle. If the water is cold, then you also will not get any lift.

Next possibility is the salt, salt kills yeast. I normally add salt after at least 3/4 of my flour has been added to my liquid. If you add the salt directly to your liquid, your yeast will be hurting.

Finally, I have no idea what a Scottish morning roll is like, but it may need some time to proof. Perhaps somebody else on the board will know more about that.
Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hey GreaseChef,
Thanks for the information. I sifted the flour and salt together as it said in the book. Then I made a well in the middle to add the liquid. I proofed it for 1 hour like it said. The dough didn't double. Maybe 1.5 times. That's all. I'm gonna try some again this morning. Do you think it's ok to add the salt after the first rising? Thanks again....!!!
Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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Dale Angelo Iannello
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post #6 of 20
You can add it after the first rising, but just adding the salt a little later when you mix it up should help. Also, water temp is pretty important, remember to think of a warm baby bottle. You know what a forehead feels like when a person has a fever of 102, that's a good gauge too. Your target temp is 100-110.
Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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Will work for a bed and shower... I want to find a place to live that isn't Vermont. I am interested in seeing a few sites.
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post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
GreaseChef,
Thanks. I'll check that temperature really good today. I'll let you know how they come out. Later....
Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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post #8 of 20
From what I've been able to Google, they look pretty straight forward.

Unbleached plain white flour - 450g (1 lb), plus extra for dusting
Salt - 2 tsp
Fresh yeast - 20g (¾ oz)
Lukewarm milk - 150 ml (5 fl oz)
Lukewarm water - 150 ml (5 fl oz)
Milk - 2 tbsp, for glazing

I seen variations with sugar and or lard added as well. When you sayt you used the "packaged stuff" do you mean instant or active dry yeast? Which one did you use? How much did the original recipe call for and how much did you substitute?
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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post #9 of 20
My guess would be either bunk yeast or over mixing the batter...just my thoughts...
Glad the doggies dug em! :lips:
Like all good meals, this too shall pass
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Like all good meals, this too shall pass
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post #10 of 20

Aberdeen Morning Roll?

Following KyleW, I googled "Scottish Morning Roll" and found this...

"Aberdeen Morning Roll"

Butterie or Rowie is a bread roll made of a high fat, croissant-like dough. Popular in the north-east and can be referred to as an "Aberdeen Morning Roll". Delicious warm with even more butter but likely to fur up the arteries!

More foodie goodies at
http://www.rampantscotland.com/parli...liamo_food.htm
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks all,
My morning rolls came out awesome!
Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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Dale Angelo Iannello
Wanna be Pastry Chef
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post #12 of 20
Being born and raised in the NE of Scotland I remember "butteries" very well. Very deliscious. What Culinarymd is talking about is what we just called rolls. They are fragrant like some of the best artisan bread I have tasted (and smelled) and they have a very soft crumb. Our local bakeries would serve them fresh each day and they make the very best sandwiches. It's one of my favorite things to look forward to when I go home to visit.

Jock
post #13 of 20

Scottish morning rolls

My grandfather was a baker in Scotland, and I have very fond childhood memories of visiting him and of watching him make his morning rolls. He had two brick ovens that he built himself. I'm no expert, but I'm going to try to help you out here.

First off, if the recipe calls for fresh yeast, you should use fresh yeast. The amounts required differ when you try to substitute. Second thing is, that the water(use filtered) temp should be about 95 degrees F. This is best for fresh yeast---dry yeast disolves best in about 110 degree water.

As for the salt, I add it right after the yeast has been dissolved and it works fine. It is true that salt kills yeast(as does heat), but bread recipes have taken this into consideration. The amount of salt has been calculated to both flavor the bread and kill the yeast at just the right time.

Last but not least, it is important to allow the rolls to rise enough during the final rise. I let mine rise almost to the point where I want the finished product. You will get a little "oven rise" in the baking process, though not much.

My grandfather heated his oven to 500-600 degrees, but he used a brick oven. I bake my morning rolls at 450 in my home oven and my rolls come out great. I also place the baking sheet on a baking stone. Oh, and use bread flour.

Hope this helps
post #14 of 20
Morning rolls are not the same as rowies. They are more floury in texture and less like croissants than rowies (which have lots of butter).

I never bake my own. Why would I? I have 3 or four brilliant bakers in the nearby vicinity!:lol:

They should be light and well risen and are certainly nothing like scones!
post #15 of 20
Using instant yeast for breads, I found that a fluffier product was achieved by allowing the dough to triple and not double in size. THAT modification has made a huge improvement in the lightness and fluffiness of my final products.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

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Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #16 of 20

I lived in Scotland for 21 yrs. and every morning started with rolls.  One of the highlights of my visits back is the walk in the morning to the newsagents (corner store) to get the paper and the rolls.   

post #17 of 20

That's my view, too... 

 

A sunday morning:  trip to the newsagent for the sunday papers and then to the bakers for a dozen, well fired morning rolls.   Served with a piece of square sausage or bacon...

 

BLISS!

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by skylightsky View Post

Following KyleW, I googled "Scottish Morning Roll" and found this...

"Aberdeen Morning Roll"

Butterie or Rowie is a bread roll made of a high fat, croissant-like dough. Popular in the north-east and can be referred to as an "Aberdeen Morning Roll". Delicious warm with even more butter but likely to fur up the arteries!

More foodie goodies at
http://www.rampantscotland.com/parli...liamo_food.htm


This correct, i'm Scottish and live in Aberdeen, home of the Rowie. I have never made my own one's yet though.

rowie.jpg

 

post #19 of 20

Thwe answer is use French flour  or ordinary flour but do not add oil  French flour is preferable if you can source it close to home but expensive if it has to be posted to you  Donald

post #20 of 20

i've lived in scotland my whole life and have been eating stag bakeries morning roll for 18+ years. go to the western isles and you'll find morning rolls!!! best damn rolls you'll ever try

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