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Rising in the middle

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone
This could be a basic question to aks but I need to know.
How to prevent the middle of a cake from rising more than the edges ?
I have tried pushing the mix towards the sides but for a mix that has more liquid, this does not work.

Thanks
:)
post #2 of 15
There is a fabulous product known to many pros as "baking strips" that are soaked in water and wrapped around the cake pan before baking. This keeps the sides of the cake from baking and solidifying too quickly thus causing the center to rise up as a dome in the middle. You can get them at most kitchen equipment stores or specialty baking shops.
If you can't find them, you can use a kitchen towel too. Just soak it in cold water, wring it out, twist it up into a long strip and wrap it around the cake pan, securing it with a pin. Your towel gets kind of toasted so don't use a pretty one. Works almost as well as the professional strips.

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Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #3 of 15
Most bakers acknowledge that problem, but don't have the time to fit pans with strips. I slightly overfill my pans and trim off the "hump" when cold. Also, after about 10 mins from taking out of the oven I usually invert the cakes without the forms on a cooling grid. The wieght of the cake will usually flatten the hump as well.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 15
There are two things you could try.

1. Bake cooler. The issue here is that the outside of the cake is setting faster than the middle. As the outside sets and stops climbing the pan wall the batter that is not set yet has to go somewhere so it takes the path of least resistance which is to flow up towards the middle which is the last part of the cake to bake. Try baking anywhere from 25 to 75 degrees F cooler. The bake will take a little longer but you should get a much more even cake. It may even be moister because the lower outside is not so much overbaked.

2. Formula. There may be too much structure in your formula. Maybe reduce flour slightly. Maybe increase sugar, fat or water slightly. If you are using real cake flour try mixing in a little pastry to weaken the structure.

3. Are you greasing the sides enough?
post #5 of 15

all above advice is good!

All the responses up above are really solid, but the one from cookieguy is the one that I subscribe to the most. Most of my career I have baked cakes.....zillions! And stuff like cake strips and wet kitchen towels are out of the question because of the amount of production I normally do.

It's easier and more beneficial to lower oven temp. You also have to consider the size of your pans. If you are baking a half sheet, a full sheet, or like a 16 inch round, oven temp has GOT to go down, or you're gonna end up with a cake that has the dryest overbaked edges ever.

Also, some cakes just naturally "hump". :lol:
The texture and taste are great, so there's no real "correction" needed in the cake formula.......so why freak out about a hump? You just trim it off when it's cool, or flip it upside down right away and it's true, the weight of the cake will flatten it right out.

I trim mine, throw the trimmings in a bucket, and when I have enough.......you know what time it is!!! Rum balls!!!!:p
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

Cake hump

Hi everyone !

I have no problem seeing a hump but the last cake I baked has a hump as tall as 25% of the body and I think if I trim that, it seems such a waste. Perhaps I should reduce the amount of baking powder to reduce the expansion.

I have tried inverting the cake after 10 minutes from the oven. Most times it flattens to a certain extent but the sides of the cake seem to expand under the weight.

I grease my pans well with flour sprinkled around it.

I have just baked another cake and monitored it throughout the baking and when it rose to the level of the top of the tin, I reduced the temperature by 20 celcius and although I have to bake for an additional fifteen minutes, it turned out with only a small hump. Guess I need to experiment more on the temperature.

Thanks for all the help and tips
:bounce:
post #7 of 15

25% higher?

If the hump on your cake is 25% higher then maybe you're putting too much batter into your cake pan. If you reduce the amount of batter & also reduce your oven temp you should end up with a smaller hump and therefore less waste. But left over cake can be frozen and, used for rum balls or a triffle too.
post #8 of 15
The cooler bake temp has to be right from the beginning otherwise you lose the advantage.
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 

Thanks

Thanks for all the advice
I certainly will try each and everyone of the suggestions to get a good result.
Regards
Yuesang:beer:
post #10 of 15
Work the cake less (ie. don't overmix the batter). Cook at a lower temperature as well.
post #11 of 15
Lower temp, absolutely. Another trick, take your finger and run an indention in the batter (like you would for a pound cake) around the circumfrence of the pan about 1 1/2" from the edge. It seems to help with thicker batters, like Italian Cream.
post #12 of 15
JENNYKHUGHES:
Good Afternoon. I read your post with much interest. I must admit I am confused about the word "ITALIAN CREAM". Why... there is such a cream that is used in pastry baking. It is very close to Bavarian cream. I am hoping you will clarify for me your rendition of "ITALIAN CREAM. Good luck & have a nice day young lady.
~Z~BESTUS.
post #13 of 15
JENNYKHUGHES:
Good Afternoon. I read your post with much interest. I must admit I am confused about the word "ITALIAN CREAM". Why... there is such a cream that is used in pastry baking. It is very close to Bavarian cream. I am hoping you will clarify for me your rendition of "ITALIAN CREAM. Good luck & have a nice day young lady.
~Z~BESTUS.
post #14 of 15

Italian Cream

I'm pretty sure she is referring to Italian Cream Cake. And no, you don't have to use cream from Italy.
post #15 of 15
This young lady is talking about Italian Cream Cake. Sorry I wasn't more specific.
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