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Interview with Bourdain

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I get an e-newsletter from Powells Bookstore in Portland, OR and they've just published a new interview with Anthony Bourdain. He was visiting to promote his new book of collected essays The Nasty Bits, but the interview touches on a number of different topics from eating with the Bushmen in the Kalahari Desert to the glamorization of chefs to the cues he picks up from menus when he walks into a restaurant cold.

http://www.powells.com/interviews/bourdain2006.html
Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #2 of 17
Thanks Phoebe, That was a great read, now I am the track of the 'Nasty' book.
post #3 of 17
Thanks, Emily! I got to meet Bourdain at my local independent bookstore a few years back. What you see is what you get- although he reined in the profanity as there were some younger fans there. I found him charming and authentic.

He used to hang out here once in a while, but not any more. Might be nice to see him here again!
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post #4 of 17
BW, you have any of Anthony Bourdains books? You should pick up a copy of A Cooks Tour or Kitchen Confidential and give it a read I believe he is right down your alley my friend. Bourdain writes has he speaks clear and to the point. And I am with mudbug, I would join Bourdain on one of his tours in a heartbeat.

Rgds Rook
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
As some of you probably already know, Bourdain and his production crew for "No Reservations" were filming in Lebanon when the bombing started. Like so many others, they're stranded in Beirut. He posted a few times to a string on EG. The string was closed down because of some of the less than sensitive comments made by some of the contributors. Here was his latest, posted last night:

"I'm very aware of how flip my response to the Post was (made last Wednesday, very early in the crisis)as I sought to reassure family and friends that we were safe and okayand in good cheer. . It was--at the time--very representative of the (outward) attitude of Beirutis themselves, who pride themselves on their resilience and their determination to "keep the party going." Initially, many Beirutis were still going strong at nightclubs as jets flew low and menacingly overhead. Even that proud, famously world-weary attitude quickly changed, however, as circumstances here became even more appalling. I can certainly understand how offensive it might be to those on the ground here--or those with family and friends here--to read some of what's been posted on the other NR thread--and understand why it's been closed for now.
It is indeed heartbreaking and horrifying what has happened to this lovely country--to spanking new, lovingly restored,resurgent Beirut in particular, in only a few days of sustained and seemingly senseless destruction. A few days ago, this was a place where people were bursting with pride for the relative tolerance, progressive attitudes, and lack of conflict between groups. I was standing with a group: a Sunni, a Christian, and a Shiite--by the Hariri memorial when the gunfire started and the Hezbollah people appeared driving through city center and honking their horns in "celebration" for the capture/kidnappings. The look of dismay and embarrasment on all three faces...and the grim look of resignation as they all-- instantly-- recognized what would inevitably come next...it's something I will never forget. Of the three, our Shiite security guy, a tall, taciturn man, was the last to leave us, insisiting on staying by our side though he and his family lived in the much more perilous Southern part of Beirut. After witnessing many quick telephone exchanges between him and his family, and as more bombs and shells began to fall, seeing him nervously fingering his prayer beads, we finally convinced him to leave. His house was later flattened..We were soon relocated to a safer part of town.The sense of regret and ...shame we feel at being relatively safe yet witness to the carnage...and that we never got to show the world how beautiful this country and its people are--how much "like us" (yet uniquely and wonderfully not), how international, muti-lingual, multi-faith..how fantastic the food and hospitality is...will gnaw at us forever. WE will make it home. WE--unlike most Lebanese, have been (relatively) safe and secure during this. Trapped, yes--but trapped by a freaking swimming pool-not under the rubble of our homes. We may be only a few thousand yards or a few miles from the falling bombs-but we have an eventual way out. What hasn't been talked about much in the press, is how many young returnees there are/were here: young, educated Lebanese who'd emigrated abroad or been born aboad and only recenly returned..how filled with hope they were, how much they loved their country, how hopeful and enthusiastic they were that they could make a difference (and they WERE making a difference). That is all ashes now..
We (the NR crew) are indeed well--and well looked after. It's indeed frightening here, it's enraging, it's horrifying,and its frustrating..the classic "long hours of boredom interspersed with moments of terror" phenom they always use when talking about life during wartime. But we are relatively safe. And sooner or later we will no doubt be heading home.
We will never forget the Beirut that could have been-and will hopefully be again. Or what we saw here."
Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #6 of 17
How desperately terribly painful.
post #7 of 17
It is a very sad moment in mankind history. My heart goes out to them.
A house is not beautiful because of its walls, but because of its cakes
- Old Russian proverb
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A house is not beautiful because of its walls, but because of its cakes
- Old Russian proverb
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post #8 of 17
Funny you should say that. It was very interesting to read Anthoneys post. Unfortunate as well. It's a shame that the middle east as well as many other parts of the world are going to **** in a handbasket because of renegade groups that take it upon themselves to use force to get their way. It's not just the Fundamentalist Muslims either. It's all over the world, in Africa, Russia, Haiti even Finland for crying out loud. We have it here too. John Lennon was right when asked if you could "Imagine" how cool the whole world could be and how much we could accomplish if we could only respect each others beliefs. But so many seem to fear that anothers beliefs that don't agree with theirs will infringe on their "perceived" rights. When 2 disagree one of them isn't always the "right" one. Both can be right, or wrong! I don't agree with everything that's shown to me, and I know it's not easy if you have to share "space" with someone who you really don't agree with. But until such time as there is another planet large enough to handle such a self imposed segregation then I'm afraid we just have to get along. But when killing or maiming becomes part of your lack of respect for others then we are on a fast track to oblivion. Too bad too, because life and nature can be pretty cool things!


My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #9 of 17
Well I for one hope they come out unharmed I really like Bourdian and his writing.

Rgds Rook
post #10 of 17

posts removed

Many posts in this thread have gone of topic. In keeping within the community guidelines all none topic related posts have been removed.

And a friendly reminder. Remember in the very first Star Wars (4,5,6 what happend (sorry another thread)) when they where trying to blow up the death star? There was one pilot who wanted to deviated from the course and what was that famous line?

"Stay on target"

So in honor the same idea "Stay on topic"
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #11 of 17
Frankly I would not read anything that that boorish person wrote. Any semblance of accomplishment associated with him is over rated.
post #12 of 17

The show airs 8.21.06

Travel Channel tomorrow night is the episode.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #13 of 17

episode aired tonight

great episode,
If only food could cure the ills of the world.....
:confused:

tuna noodle cassarole and cheezy mac with a little lamb stew and hummus!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
I agree. We had taped it, so I just saw it last night. Very moving.
The chef in him really came out when, after several days of uncertainty (no response from the embassy, etc.), Bourdain asks the hotel kitchen if he can cook something for his crew. You can see his face relax as his hands grab the knife and onions like life-lines. No matter where you are, he says, kitchens are the same. They offer a familiarity that is reassuring.

And seeing his face light up for that tuna noodle cassarole and cheezy mac on the USS Nashville was both funny and very moving. His shots of the Marines on the ship, their kindness and great generosity to everyone onboard were especially touching.
Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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Emily

______________________

"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #15 of 17
Agreed! A very moving show.
post #16 of 17

Bourdain is maybe our last hope

I read Nasty Bits. I found it a mix of his clever fiction and his real to life journaled experiences. "No Resevations", the Travel Channel show, is mildly amusing and I ususally catch the 1:00 am re-run after I get home from the restaurant. I think Bourdain can take this whole, "Hey, look how cool it is to be a chef", thing and give a twist of real realism. Anthony, if you happen to chum through this web site, take into consideration doing a "hidden cam in a real kitchen", thing. And then follow us (the real cooks that do real cooking), to our favorite bars and then to "after hours". That would be a show worth watching! HBO...are you listening to this???
post #17 of 17

Real cooks, don't ignore this

Let's voice a real opinion, here. How many professional cooks and chefs are reading this? When I say "professional", I mean to say...Do you work in a real reataurant? Have you...if you do not currently? Do you know how irritating it is to have customers ask rediculous things of you? Do you know what it's like working with illegal labor that is willing to work for less than you work for? How good is your Mexican Spanish? If you can take pressure, heat, burns, and insults on a regular basis, apply here. Oh, By the way, do you drink? Better not drink too much before work...just enough to numb things a bit. I'll meet you later to smoke out. So?? Prey tell...What say you??
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