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What is the French term for

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
the decorations usually used on deserts where they alternate colored sauces - then draw lines through it to create an aesthetic pattern? Wish I could post a picture but hopefully I've given enough info.

Thanks

Bond
post #2 of 13
plus d'argent
:D
just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
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just an old guy learning to live off his own cooking
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post #3 of 13
This came from AllRecipes.com:

Is that what you mean? Try asking in the Pastry forum; it's used a lot in desserts.
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #4 of 13
In the interest of making the threads available to those from other countries who might not use English as their first language, much less French, "plus d'argent" = "more money"

(which obviously was a joke)

Bond,

Are you asking if a term exists at all for the technique? Or do you already know there is one, but just can not recall the term?
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
There is a French term used for the "spider web" patterns on pastries and deserts but I can't recall what it is.

Bond
post #6 of 13
Probably best to move this thread to the Pastry Forum. ;)

Bond,
Does d'araignée ring a bell?
post #7 of 13
Having done these umpteen million times in different patterns and designs, I can attest that in the pro-food world this technique is usually called
"sauce painting".
It's also used for offering other than desserts and IMHO it is becoming very cliche.

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Liquored up and laquered down,
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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #8 of 13
Iv'e always refered to it as pulling the sauce. Most likely a literal translation for one of the many stellar pastry chefs I have known.........
post #9 of 13
Oh,....Duh... the "French" term forsauce painting.

The earlier suggestion sounds good.

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
There's a French word for this process and it starts with the letter "P".

I just can't remember what it is. I was hoping someone on this forum would know.
post #11 of 13
Ahhh those wacky French people. They have a word for everything!:o
Howzabout the literal translation? peinture de plat
My latest musical venture!
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #12 of 13

Lines on napoleon or mille feuille

Marbrer un mille-feuille au fondant or the verb marbrer=to marble. Marbrage au cornet.
post #13 of 13
When I hear em spouting that francois stuff I just say parley voo..wee wee monsewer etc. Bascially if it sounds soothing pronounce it as you like. Will not make much of a foo paw in my estimation. Now there is some groups which take it mo serious..Quebeckerpeckers for example. I would try to stick close to the Queen's English if I was to be prone to hang out with that group. Just trying to help cover all the bases here.

bigwheel
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