ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Making Steak Interesting...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Making Steak Interesting...

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any tips? My dad makes me cook lots of steak and all he ever wants on it is garlic and pepper. Anyone have any tips for making it more interesting?
post #2 of 16
Thread Starter 
-.0

Nobody is saying anything...
post #3 of 16
Serve it in the nude?:eek:
Actually I am in the school of let the steak shine. But you might consider one of my favorites and that is compound butters. I reviewed a great book you might like to check out on the subject. http://www.cheftalk.com/content/disp...=127&type=book
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
Reply
post #4 of 16
Robert, sometimes it takes more than a few hours to respond to someone's post. Many of us work in the industry and hang out on here when we are not at work, taking care of the family, doing chores, walking the dogs, etc. There are lots of ways to "jazz" up steaks, from sauces to crusts, to various toppings such as compound butters a chrose mentioned. For more on Grilling the Perfect Steak and for ideas for topping that steak, here is a 2 part article I wrote for Chef Talk. It should give a few ideas.

Part I
http://www.cheftalk.com/content/disp...?articleid=214

Part II (with links to topping recipes)

http://www.cheftalk.com/content/disp...5&type=article

Hope these help.
post #5 of 16
I tend to be a purist when it comes to steaks. A good, dry aged, well marbled piece of meat has its own unique flavor that the meat producer has gone to great lengths to create. Tarting it up with anything other than S&P is an adulteration.

The good stuff does tend to be a bit pricey though and for lesser cuts I like a red wine sauce and/or maybe some mushrooms.

Jock
post #6 of 16
I agree with what Jock has said . The quality of the beef would be the best way to jazz it up.

The other thing I do on occasions is to add garlic , salt and pepper to melted butter and brush it on the steak while its resting (also important) That is after it is cooked and removed from the grill. I toss and coat the steak rather than serve this as a sauce.

I also do the same with olive oil and salt and pepper.

The other great thing to go with steak is horseradish. But it must be freshly grated. Grate as much as you like into sour cream (or goats yoghurt for the healthier inclined) and serve as a sauce.

Its is also important to cook the steak at room temperature. So remove it from the fridge a while before cooking. The steak should also be thoroughly dried with kitchen towel to avoid any chance of "stewing" . If the meat is vacum packed and here in Aus much of our high grade beef is. You may find a "stink" once you open the packet. I find its best to wash the meat in red wine and then thoroughly dry before cooking .
post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well I certainly hope I didn't sound pompous or ungrateful. :cry:

Thanks for the tips and such, I'll try and use them when my father buys more steak.
post #8 of 16
Robert,
Don't take any offense...but it was 1:20 in the morning!
Either we were all on our way home, at the bar, or asleep!
Smile, and enjoy being a carnivore!
:chef:
L
post #9 of 16
Robert-
I certainly take Jock's point, but I usually don't get the Whole Foods' dry-aged strip, rib-eye, or tenderloin at $25/lb or so. :eek: If I do, I just go with salt, pepper, olive oil and lemon juice. Like, once a year. :rolleyes:

For most of my steaking, I go with a flank steak from the local Polish sausage-and-meat store at more like $6 per pound (it's still USDA Choice.) I like to put a slurryof Danish Blue cheese, LOTS of garlic, and olive oil, ground up in a mini-cuisinart, on the flank steak. Sprinkle generously with cayenne pepper, and let it ferment in the fridge for several hours, than onto a hot grill for about four minutes per side.

Unless your dad has a problem with cayenne, he should find it a different and interesting approach.

Mike
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #10 of 16
I like steaks with a nice Chipotle butter. It's probably pretty fattening but MAN is it GOOD!
post #11 of 16
Maybe this will help with the "presentation" of your steak.
Food for thought:confused:

http://www.hatsofmeat.com/
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
post #12 of 16
Maybe that's what Archie Bunker had in mind.

Kevin
post #13 of 16
:confused: Huh?
Who's Archie Bunker?
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
Reply
post #14 of 16
I've got to agree with the "keep it simple" school of steak cookery.

However, I like to accompany my rare steak (the way they're cooked and the frequency with which I can eat them) with caramelized onions and sauteed mushrooms with thyme and sherry. HMMM!!
post #15 of 16
What time is dinner?:bounce: :D

I wouldn't mind some good Maytag Bleu cheese or a Glace de viand either.
post #16 of 16
"Who's Archie Bunker?"

You must be young. Very famous TV show ("All In The Family") character fond of using the endearment "Meat Head", when addressing his son-in-law.

Kevin

I'm must be getting old.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Making Steak Interesting...