or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

thickening

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Can soup be thickened by cooking and then blending rice into it?:chef:
post #2 of 9
yes, i generaly use basmati
Sweet Jesus
Reply
Sweet Jesus
Reply
post #3 of 9
Yes, it can also be thickened that way with potato, or any other starch/starchy vegetable... (Rice flour, potato flour, pureed root vegetables, etc...)
post #4 of 9
As stated, yes. But it might not be what you're looking for.

what soups? What ratio of liquid to other ingredients?

What seasoning? Enough rice to thicken the soup can make it bland?

What about leftovers. The rice is going to continue to expand and absorb liquid. Is this acceptable?

Tell us more about how you intend to use it. It might be an awful solution even though it would thicken it.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #5 of 9
GB HUNTER:
Good afternoon. Re-read member P HATCH post he is correct in his assessment. I would apply a ROUX. If you go that route there are a few members here that are capable in assisting you with the info. Good luck & have a nice day.

~Z~BESTUS.:chef:
post #6 of 9
By all means you can thicken a soup by cooking rice in it and then blending. That is what defines a bisque.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #7 of 9
That's an ODD definition of Bisque....
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #8 of 9
Twenty years, a French chef told me that what defines a bisque is that it is a thick pureed soup thickened with rice. He said that over the years a lot of people had taken liberties with the term bisque, but the definition he gave me he said was taken from Escoffier. I had no reason to question him and have believed it to this day. Somewhat in suppport, here is a blurb from an article in Art Culinaire; 9/22/2001:"In Escoffier's view, bisques fell into the "puree" family, a category in which a puree of the main ingredient formed the base, and rice, bread, or starchy vegetables the body."
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
Reply
post #9 of 9
Never seen it done with rice.

Interesting.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking