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Orient at home

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Hey oh

Been a longish while since I was last active. Had a wee bit of trouble gaining acesse back, but, Nicko fixed it all up XD

So, I am again "trying something new" and have not realy had luck finding a way to accompaney this experience.

This is what I am going to have a try of:

http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/...ps+sort%3Atime

These, I do believe, are the 1000 year old eggs. While, yes, I could just crack into them and nosh, I'd much rather do a dinner or setting and would like some suggestions what I could do to make it a bit of a bigger experience.

ad(thnx)vance

Keeps
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Space...the final frontier. These are the voyages of KeeperOfTheGood. His lifetime mission: to explore strange new worlds of flavour, to seek out new life and and ways of cooking it- to boldly grill where no man has grilled before.
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post #2 of 6
Usually they are eaten with congee aka jook aka rice porridge as are the salted duck eggs. My mom used to make them all the time this way. They are not 1000 years old but look like fossils I agree. They can also be sliced and placed on a tray with other sliced cold meats.
post #3 of 6
Mangilao30 beat me to it: the only way I've eaten them is chopped up into congee, along with slivered ginger and scallions, whole peanuts, and diced cooked pork. The texture takes some getting used to -- the white is kind of jelly-like, and the yolk on the tough side -- as does the taste (indescribable), but if you get to like them, you will love them.

This sort of congee is more often eaten for breakfast, but it can be a satisfying "soup-type" meal anytime.
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 6
Sometimes, I just slice them and eat them with pickled ginger :talk:
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Visit my site on home-cooked Asian recipes!

http://deliciousasianfood.com
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post #5 of 6
Although the most popular use of them is in congee with lean pork, another dish you can do is a savoury egg custard with chopped cooked salted egg and chopped thousand year egg. My aunt makes this every once in a while... but yes, thousand year egg is an ingredient that should be used and served simply. My family also serves it sliced with a little sugar for dipping to go with rice.
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #6 of 6
Jook, yes that is the best way (IMO) to eat them.

They are cured with lime, black tea and charcoal ash and take 100 days to cure, not 1000 years.
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"A meal without wine is like a day without sunshine"
Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, The Physiology of Taste (1825)
Food blog of chef Robert Conaway
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