or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Penzey's Spices - Page 2

post #31 of 55

I never buy Garam Masala. I prefer to make mine from scratch. I do wish they carried Jamaican Ginger though, as there is a difference. I'm told its more pungent.

 

My pantry contains mostly common spices but only because my job requires me to use what the average cook will have on hand. Nevertheless, I use Tellicherry Black Pepper almost exclusively when I want a Black Pepper because its sweeter and less harsh.

 

Other spices I can't live without:

Allspice, Anise (small amounts), Annatto (Oil/Seeds),
Basil Leaves, Black Cardamom, Black Peppercorn,

Bragg's Liquid Amino (GF Soy Sauce, intense flavour, half the salt)
Cayenne, Chili Powder, Cilantro Leaves, Cloves, Coriander, Cumin, Curry Leaves,
Dark Red Chili Powder, 
Fennel Seed, French Basil, Four Peppercorn
Ginger, Green Cardamom, Green Peppercorn,
Hungarian Paprika,

Kosher Sea Salt
Marjoram, Muntok White Peppercorn, Mysore Green Peppercorn,
Nutmeg,
Oregano,
Paprika, Parsley Leaves,
Saffron, Sage, Salt, Savory, Star Anise (small amounts), Sweet Basil, Szechuan Peppercorns (so far),
Thyme, Tellicherry Black Pepper, Turkish Oregano, Turmeric,
White Pepper, White Peppercorn,
 
Spices I want to try:
Ajwain Seed (Carom Seed), Galangal (related to Ginger), Kala Jeera (Black Cumin)

Celtic Sea Salt (to see if there is any real difference)

 

 

 

post #32 of 55
@alergkvegtarian

My wife is Indian so we buy their Ajwain seed which supposedly helps with people that have problems with eating lots of legumes and I bought some Galangal last time I was there too as I was making bread pudding and was buying ground ginger and it happened to be on the same rack as the ginger. I was like hmm never heard of it and it said it was a compliment to ginger so I bought a small little jar of it maybe 2oz. I was using it in the bread pudding as a "What is in this? I know there is something else besides ginger I just cant put my tongue on it?" kind of effect. Worked out well smile.gif
post #33 of 55

To say I use Indian spices a lot, is a bit of an understatement. lol.gif  Earlier this week, I made a Faux Chicken Rice dish with Punjabi styled tomato sauce. It was very good. The only problem was I did not measure anything and so I don't have the recipe for my website. Oops! I do know that Tumeric really gave it a good flavour. drinkbeer.gif

post #34 of 55

To say I use Indian spices a lot, is a bit of an understatement. lol.gif  Earlier this week, I made a Faux Chicken Rice dish with Punjabi styled tomato sauce. It was very good. The only problem was I did not measure anything and so I don't have the recipe for my website. Oops! I do know that Tumeric really gave it a good flavour. drinkbeer.gif

post #35 of 55
Haha I HATE doing that! I have done that many times. Experimented on a dish and it turned out really well but I never wrote down exactly what I did because it was an experiment! One of the things I have learned from her while cooking Indian food is how simple it is. It is simply about layering flavors. Start with some hot oil, saute some dried chilis, some mustard seed, or cumin, and build on that. I am trying to make her butter chicken as well as she does. Its really simple to make but hard to get it to come out just right. Another 40 years and I may just be able to compete with her smile.gif

Chris
post #36 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by X86BSD View Post

Haha I HATE doing that! I have done that many times. Experimented on a dish and it turned out really well but I never wrote down exactly what I did because it was an experiment! One of the things I have learned from her while cooking Indian food is how simple it is. It is simply about layering flavors. Start with some hot oil, saute some dried chilis, some mustard seed, or cumin, and build on that. I am trying to make her butter chicken as well as she does. Its really simple to make but hard to get it to come out just right. Another 40 years and I may just be able to compete with her smile.gif
Chris


I still feel like I have a lot to learn! lol.gif



To get this back on topic: I went to Williams Sonoma and drooled over the speciality salts and spices. They had Galangal. I alsmot bought some. Next time.

post #37 of 55

Chris, we may have been in the Brookfield store at the same time and not known it. I live between it and the one at Hy. 83. What a great convenience!  I used the Penzeys sweet curry powder in an ice cream I dreamed up a few years ago: coconut mango curry. I thought it'd be great alone or for dessert after an Indian meal. 

 

I think their fenugreek is in seed and ground forms only; I don't recall seeing dried leaves. I recently tried a gouda cheese with the seeds in it at the MetroMart and am hooked. I haven't experimented with it in dishes yet.

 

As for the cinnamon, I still use the Vietnamese in my morning oatmeal but prefer the new blend Shroom mentioned in coffee. I also add allspice and freshly grated nutmeg. I sprinkle these in the empty mug, then brew the coffee in the Keurig and let it bloom the spices a bit in the mug before enjoying it. I got a bunch of nutmegs (and fresh mace, too) in Grenada last week while on a cruise. I'll be experimenting with those two flavors a lot now. I think my husband will be eating quiet a bit of jerk chicken and pork, too!

 

Welcome to the community, Chris!

Mezz

Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #38 of 55

Thought you used all fresh herbs??

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezzaluna View Post

Chris, we may have been in the Brookfield store at the same time and not known it. I live between it and the one at Hy. 83. What a great convenience!  I used the Penzeys sweet curry powder in an ice cream I dreamed up a few years ago: coconut mango curry. I thought it'd be great alone or for dessert after an Indian meal. 

I think their fenugreek is in seed and ground forms only; I don't recall seeing dried leaves. I recently tried a gouda cheese with the seeds in it at the MetroMart and am hooked. I haven't experimented with it in dishes yet.

As for the cinnamon, I still use the Vietnamese in my morning oatmeal but prefer the new blend Shroom mentioned in coffee. I also add allspice and freshly grated nutmeg. I sprinkle these in the empty mug, then brew the coffee in the Keurig and let it bloom the spices a bit in the mug before enjoying it. I got a bunch of nutmegs (and fresh mace, too) in Grenada last week while on a cruise. I'll be experimenting with those two flavors a lot now. I think my husband will be eating quiet a bit of jerk chicken and pork, too!

Welcome to the community, Chris!
Mezz


Wow small world! I didn't think they had fenugreek. The wife and I get packages of the fenugreek leaves from the Gayathri Indian store @ 19035 W. Bluemound next to the healthfood store. They have the best deal on garlic bulbs too. You should try the leaves they are one of my favorite herbs now. I dump them in my cream sauces, on chicken, veggies, in my grilled cheese sandwiches, I just love it smile.gif I also didn't know metromart had fenugeek cheese! The first time I had it in cheese was at Aillwee cave in Clare, Ireland. I bought a ton of their cheese to bring back. Great stuff, now I will have to swing by metromarket and grab some thanks for the lead! I'm also going to have to try your idea of curry ice cream this summer, maybe serve it in a coconut shell. It sounds delicious! I have to take the dog to the vet at noon today but then I think its time for another visit to penzeyes to see whats new smile.gif
post #40 of 55

For a banquet some time ago, I served Curry Sorbet in a mango. It went over pretty good, only I have found in food that  for John T. Public

he does not really care for curries that much or do they love coconut,  this is not all,  but a great many.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefedb View Post

For a banquet some time ago, I served Curry Sorbet in a mango. It went over pretty good, only I have found in food that  for John T. Public
he does not really care for curries that much or do they love coconut,  this is not all,  but a great many.

Well I know I have never liked coconut that much. Mainly because I always think of the dried shredded coconut in the package at the store thats loaded with sugar. I remember trying that as a kid and thinking it was pretty vile. I know thats not real, fresh coconut but it only takes one incident as a kid to put you off something smile.gif But several women I know seem to love coconut. Coconut car fresheners, coconut candles, etc smile.gif So I thought serving it in a coconut half as a bowl might be nice. We will see. But I agree with you I am not a huge fan of coconut.
post #42 of 55

The package of Fenugreek at some Indian stores might say Peacock on the label.

post #43 of 55

Reviving an old thread rather than starting a new one ... I still depend on Penzey's for really fresh spices and for excellent India spice mixtures.

 

Their rogan josh is still one of my favorite seasonings. Tellicherry black pepper from them is another long-time favorite. I've found that their selection of paprika is really good. I usually buy their half-sharp and smoked paprika. I have ordered some berbere from them to see if it's as good as what that I got from Ethiopianspices.com.

 

I don't go for their salty things such as "sandwich sprinkle", but I don't go for that kind of seasoning in general, so it's nothing against Penzeys.

post #44 of 55

There's a convenience store a few blocks north of here owned by an Indian family. No hot dog rollers, but some really good home made samosas and potato wedges, and quite a large variety of spices and special ingredients.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #45 of 55

Man. I want samosas.

post #46 of 55

I know the question is nearly 10 years old, but since the thread is still alive: the Maharaja curry is their best curry powder. The price reflects that too.

 

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/maharajah-style-curry-powder/c-24/p-144/pd-s

 

post #47 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by French Fries View Post
 

I know the question is nearly 10 years old, but since the thread is still alive: the Maharaja curry is their best curry powder. The price reflects that too.

 

https://www.penzeys.com/online-catalog/maharajah-style-curry-powder/c-24/p-144/pd-s

 


I always have some of that on hand. Creamy noodle dishes always get a bit of that, on my plate anyway.

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by OregonYeti View Post
 

Man. I want samosas.

 

They are just mashed potato, peas and some spices in a wrapper. And OH SO good. And only 99 cents each! I've never eaten more than 4 at a time, though I've been tempted.

 

As I've mentioned before I think a good challenge theme would be wrapper, filling, sauce. Samosas would qualify with a dipping sauce.

 

mjb.

Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamfat View Post
 

I think a good challenge theme would be wrapper, filling, sauce. 

That's a great idea. Time for you to win the current challenge so you can use that idea next month! I'll make nem rán with nước chấm! :) 

post #50 of 55

I was thinking of having something similar as a challenge:

Envelopes, parcels, enclosures or whatever you would call it, but decided to go for mince instead.

So throw some mince and spices in the wrapper and enter it as a samoosa :bounce:

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply

Life is too short to drink bad wine
---Anonymus---

Reply
post #51 of 55
I like to order from spice barn
post #52 of 55

I just made some egg salad for sandwiches. Free-range chickens made these eggs. Might have even mated with geese, who knows.

 

Hard-boiled eggs, salt, Tellicherry pepper freshly ground, mayo, and some Penzey's Maharaja curry spice. Yummm.

 

 


Edited by OregonYeti - 3/18/15 at 8:24am
post #53 of 55

As an guest chef, I taught at a a Savory Spice Shop in Greensboro, NC. I like them a lot since the freshness of their spices are guaranteed. The selections are excellent including some special blends that I find wonderful.

 If you study their lists, you may find things that you did not even know about.

These are some of my more useful/uncommon selections

Mesquite Smoke Flavoring

Pimenton De La Vera, dulce (smoked paprika) (see recipe Potatoes Catalan)

Jamaican Jerk Seasoning, Extra Hot

Mapuche Style Merken Chili powder (Merquen)

Chile, Aji Amarillo, Ground (aka Aji escabeche)

Chile, Habanero, Ground

Pearl Street Cedar Plank rub (I use this on salmon and sweet potato fries)

Sea Salt, French Fleur de Sel

Sumac, Ground (Persun food)

Peppercorns, Szechwan (thai and Chinese)

Vanilla Extract, Pure Tahitian

Demi Glaze, Veal

Mushrooms, Porcini, Dried

Parmesan Pesto Sprinkle

Kaffir Lime Leaf Powder

 

 

Catalan Potatoes

 

The belly rules the mind. ~Spanish Proverb

Spanish Potatoes Aborregas (shepherd's potatoes) are similar and adds 1 ½ teaspoons pimentón (smoked Spanish paprika). Catalan cuisine is a Mediterranean cuisine from Catalonia, Spain. Barcelona is the second largest city in Spain and the capital of Catalonia.

 

4-6 Yukon Gold potatoes

¼ Cup salt pork

½ Cup sliced Spanish onions or shallots

½ Cup green onions, chopped (optional)

2 Cloves minced garlic

2 Tablespoons olive oil

1 Sprig fresh chopped thyme

1 Teaspoon summer savory (optional)

2 Sprigs flesh chopped rosemary

Handful freshly chopped parsley

1 ½ teaspoons pimentón (smoked Spanish paprika) as in Aborregas Spanish Potatoes

Add aji Ancho and aji Amarillo chili powder to taste

Add a handful of cherry tomatoes (optional)

 

Boil potatoes in their skins until near fork tender. Drain and cool potatoes. Slice potatoes 3/8 inch thick and set aside.

 

Cut salt pork into 1 inch by ¼ inch bits and place in 4 cups of cold water and bring to a simmer, continue simmer another 5 minutes. Drain, pat dry.  Sauté salt pork in olive oil (and optional paprika) until they just begin to brown.

 

Add sliced onions (or shallots) and cover until tender. Add garlic, salt and pepper and potatoes. Toss and turn these as they cook. Add thyme and rosemary and other seasonings Cover and cook over moderate heat for 10 minutes. Toss and turn allow the potatoes to brown lightly. Correct the seasoning with salt and pepper. Garnish with a handful of freshly chopped parsley.

post #54 of 55

I've had great experience mail ordering from Savory Spice Shop.  I have no experience with some of the other options, though, who may be just as good.

post #55 of 55
Buy spice barn. Drogheria & aumentar come from italy in grinding bottles and you get them on amazon.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking