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Alternative Career Positions, Same Arena.

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I have know Chefs who have been Salesman for Food supply companies, Bartenders, Butchers/Meat cutters, Food and Beverage Directors, Purchasing Agents, Started Produce Companies, Operated Restuarant Supply Houses, Work for Test kitchens of Corparations to standardize food products, Starting and organizing Farmers Markets, operating breweries, vinyards. I can see that there are alot of choices today when working in the food industry. And more than likely there are much more that I have missed. I belive this is a good thing to observe when looking for different avenues of the business for employment oppertunities. Just a little something I was pondering about. I do that sometimes; I'll say "what if I had decided to do this or go that route" lots of good oppertunities.
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
post #2 of 7
Boredom sets in if I do the same type of work for too long, I need the excitement of working with new skills. Catering, personal cheffing, organizing events, founding and running a farmers market, helping farmers market their products,all are wonderfully exciting and there will always be new ways to explore the food industry.....physically I will not be able to maintain a strenuous cooking life for more than 15 more years. So I'm working toward other income generating venues. Enjoying what you do is paramount, the money should follow.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 7
Layjo-

You'll find that a lot of the folks who go into those careers do it for the schedules. They can still be in the foodservice business and have a 9 to 5 job.
Michael
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Michael
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post #4 of 7
Layjo, I just took a Mon-Fri job with the State of California in the CHP Academy kitchen because of the schedule, benefits, and the less/stress factors that will aid me in some other important obligations that I have. I still love the business and as long as I can still wield my Wustofs I believe I will be happy. I think balance in life is very important especially if others are affected by your schedule and benefits, and there is plenty of opportunity in this industry to fit any professional's needs and circumstances.

[This message has been edited by chefjohnpaul (edited October 02, 2000).]
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Well said, everyone! I have said many times, when I was younger, that I would work as a Cook and eventually a Chef for the rest of my life. But now a days I have been more opened minded about different oppertunities which could and would come into my path during my career. I always keep in mind that I should try to live my life to it's fullest, because we only live one life. But with more and more different experiences to experience, yours and my life can seem like it has been compounded with interest. Right now I'm concerned with learning all that I can, doing all that I can, and enjoying every day, hour, and minute. Thanks for the disscusion time everyone!

Monkey See, Monkey Do.
How Do You Think A Child Learns To Tie A Shoe?
He Takes Each Lace With Poise And Grace.
And After Many Tries He Becomes An Ace!
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
post #6 of 7
another option which not many chefs think of or think it is not as prestigious is a diet and nutrition kitchen usually in conjunction with a private hospital, I worked in one part time for 2 years and it was fantastic...[the only reason I left was I missed the buzz of the brigade and service..the money was actually better than what I'm getting now] but if you want to get to know ingredients and different cuisines do this for a change of pace...you have so many clients[thats what they are called not patients] and you are given their data about their health problem, what they like to eat and quantity of food they intake...on this information you devise menus which you have to test an easy example is an italian diabetic with hypertension...a really hard case [the hardest I ever had] was a polish, renal failure,diabetic,allergic to certain foods [well first off polish food...a week or 2 menus worth...research research and then modify all those recipes to suit her condition [oh yeah these are 3 course meals/it was a nightmare cos she would only eat polish food..!]...look all I am trying to say is its a lot of research, trial and error...but now I am in a large hotel and can accommodate any guests needs by modifying recipes to taste the same as I can possibly get it...I ts an interesting job and I learnt so much about other cuisines and I learnt how to modify and substitute in recipes.
post #7 of 7
I've been doing consulting for two restaurants and corporate and private contract catering and I'm my own Boss.
You can do what ever you want to do at your own compasity. As long as your happy at what your doing.
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
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