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Alcohol for spirit burner

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I need help! Can someone please tell me what kind of alcohol to use in a spirit (bunsen) burner for sugar work? I went to Chef Notter's class and he said to use a certain type, I thought I'd remember...you know the rest. Got most of my tools/supplies together and ready to rock.
post #2 of 14
denatured alcohol
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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the information. It's really great having this resource.
post #4 of 14
take pics!!
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post #5 of 14
Yeah take pics so someone thats given up on it can see what others can do. Not that it matters much but a propane torch or culinary torch will work too as long as they are clean burning.

Rgds
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'll only post pics if I can duplicate what I hoped I've learned in class. I use a propane torch as well as spirit burner (especially since I shelled out the dough for both). I will have all my suppliers together this weekend and will hopefully try it solo for the first time this weekend. Keep your fingers crossed for me.:bounce:
post #7 of 14
did you do the hearts? It took me many attempts before I got it down.
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post #8 of 14
Thread Starter 
I don't know what hearts you're talking about. We did a clown, rose on a limb, two swans on a stand with a rose, a fruit bowl, goldfish, an obscure flower arrangement and for the finale, a geisha. He showed a ton of different methods and opened my mind to a lot of possibilities. The hardest thing for me is pulling ribbons. (that is if you're not including the blisters as being the hardest thing) Are doing any sugar art now? Any good tips or advice?
post #9 of 14
Yes,
anytime we have a little time. We stock up on flowers and any orders.
The hearts were just like a normal blow in white sugar. You bring it up like a light bulb, score it across the top and kind of flatten the sides. When done right the look great and can be shaded for a really nice finish. Ewald of course made it look so simple. Did he do a horse for ya?

Hey CJ, on the ribbons, my work buddie had a problem at first. We took some ribbon stock, took the gloves off and I had him grease his fingers up a little. Then we pulled them that way. You get a better feel then with the gloves. Then do it with the gloves.It came very quickly for him. May want to give that a try.

If you are really getting a lot of blisters, try cotton gloves under the latex. It works great. They are really cheap on line.
Have fun:crazy: pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #10 of 14
Thread Starter 
Great tips, thanks! I'll definitely try the ribbon thing. It seemed my biggest problem was with the gloves sticking along the way and the greased fingers would help with that. (of course a lot of practice wouldn't hurt).

Chef Notter didn't do much else besides what he worked with us on. I love all the different methods - the bubble sugar, spun sugar, and did you see the rock sugar inside a pastillage egg that looked like a geode? Awesome and so easy!
post #11 of 14
CJ,
Just remember that you need to be gloved when making something your going to keep.
pan
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post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Yeah, I re-read your message and thought that's what you were getting at. I'm just a hobbyist (albeit an avid one) and have never really seen pulled sugar other than on TV. Do a lot of places use it, and if so, where?
post #13 of 14
I'm not so sure anymore. I know good hotels, we have a little bakery and have been using it for 1/2 yr. after a long break from it. I'm just getting used to the isomalt. Regular sugar is actually a little easier to work with, that's all I have ever used until now.Just my opinion though.
The gloves are mainly to keep the moisture of your hands off the sugar.
have fun.
pan
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post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
I tried plain sugar (with glucose) but had trouble with it turning too dark. I'm rechecking my thermometer to make sure it didn't over-heat and will try again. Had better luck with Isomalt, at least in the cooking part-I didn't try working it yet.
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