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preparing dandelion greens

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Tonight I am grilling veal rib chops, topping them with, tomatoes roasted with oregano, salt, pepper and extra vir. olive oil,oil cured olives all drizzled with a lemon buerre blanc. Sides are oven roasted baby russetts and dandelion greens. My question is, what would be an interesting way to cook the greens?:chef:
post #2 of 15
Sounds like you've got a lot going with the veal. I would just saute the greens, a little olive oil and garlic. But then, that's what I almost always do with all kinds of greens. :o
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

dandelion greens

you are absolutely right!! Thanks, Suzanne
post #4 of 15
one of my favorite salads is tender dandelion greens. They're much less bitter than chickory, but much tastier than lettuce. My mother and old italian neighbor used to cut them out of the lawn with a knife. Only the tender ones. Just use them raw, well washed, and season with olive oil and vinegar, salt and pepper. Lots of crusty bread on the side.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 

dandelion greens

Siduri, great minds think alike. I had never tasted dandelion greens before. When I tasted one, I immediately thought no cooking, but a salad with lemon juice, xtra virgn olive oil, salt and pepper. I'm psyched and we have a good friend stopping by, spur of the moment. Good thing I had planned a good dinner tonight!:lips:
post #6 of 15
Sorry for the late reply all, have had problems with my internet connection..dandelion greens are considered in switzerland (where I lived for 20 yrs) as a great salad served with very crispy bacon pieces, grilled croutons, and poached eggs with a vinaigrette dressing.. I loved eating that when I was living there. Try to choose the most tender dandelions. It was considered something quite 'gourmet' and the season only lasts for approx 1 month.
post #7 of 15
My grandma always served them with a hot bacon dressing, like you'd use for a spinch salad. She also did this with endive. You can serve it cooked or as a salad and use the bacon dressing for either.
post #8 of 15
I can still see my Grandmother filling her apron. She would then tie the greens in the apron and I would bring them inside.
Greens, hot peppers. roasted garlic, balsamic, dates, olive oil, parm, Lots of Italian bread.
Hot, always with penne, the big white fava beans and panchetta.yum.
She also did something with those greens when we had a very sweet dessert. I can't remember, but they went into the small espresso pots that you flip over.??
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #9 of 15
If you dig dandelion leaves straight out of the lawn they can sometimes be face-twistingly bitter, especially in summer. I'm sure everyone knows this tip, but... if you cover the plant with an inverted flowerpot or upside-down dinner plate for a few days before harvesting the leaves, to keep the sun off, the leaves are tender and much sweeter.

And don't forget to warn your dinner guests that dandelion has spectacularly effective diuretic properties - which is why the French call it pissenlit (wet-the-bed)!
post #10 of 15

dandelion green

If you go to wwwfoodandwine.com you will find a recipe for Dandelion green and Shiitake calzones...:)
A house is not beautiful because of its walls, but because of its cakes
- Old Russian proverb
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A house is not beautiful because of its walls, but because of its cakes
- Old Russian proverb
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post #11 of 15
Similar to "pisse-en-lit", in my parent's dialect of northern tuscany they called dandelion "pisciacane" (dog pi--er) but tuscans are famous for their rather crude language (see benigni).
the stuff your grandmotehr put in the coffee, panini, is probably chicory, not dandelion - they used it during the war to make "coffee" and to make coffee last longer since it's bitter.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #12 of 15
I can remember the chicory. This was something she did with the greens. Something was steeped. I can remember them pulling the tea like holder out of a small pot. Then they would add it to their cups. I now remember it was not for the kids so it must of had some type of liquor in it. I call up this weekend, I'll ask someone and get back. This type of stuff ruins me until I find out. I'll bet out of 48 cousins no one will remember:eek:
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #13 of 15
Siduri,
You are right on the chicory. I just got off the phone with my cousin Serafino and he tells me I'm crazy, it was chicory. Course I was the only one hanging in the kitchen:D
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #14 of 15
I think they wouldn't give it to the kids because it was too bitter. glad you found out. It's so nice to retrieve old family recipes.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #15 of 15

when i was a kid in Austria...

..young,wild growing dandelion leaves were our first greens after a long winter and the BEST salad. with sliced, warm potatoes, home made cider vineagar and pumpkin seed oil.
young leaves are not bitter.
and now the commercially grown dandelions are also not bitter.but i believe it is such a delicate green, why saute / cook it? we eat to little fresh stuff anyway. serve it rather as a side salad.
good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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