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Tri Tip Beef

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any experience and or suggestions for preparing and cooking tri tip (sp) beef. We have several whole ones and haven't seen any recipes that bowl me over while searching the WWW. It would be something we would sell by the slice. We already sell plenty of brisket (not bbq style) so I was hoping to find something a little different. Any and all suggestion are appreciated.
Bill
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Bill
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post #2 of 12
Hey Bill,
The whole tri-tips are a favorite in my household, and I love cooking them because they're quite easy to prepare.

When I'm rushed for time, I throw a couple under the broiler (10-15 min per side, for med. rare) with Montreal Steak seasoning. After it rests, slice fairly thin and serve with horseradish...

I found a FANTASTIC marinade/glaze recipe from Sara Moulton on Food TV's website: http://snipurl.com/ysuz, which I use for special occasions, or even when we go camping. It has a lot of ingredients, and is a bit labor-intensive, but worth every minute spent! It also calls for flank steak in the recipe, but I've only used it on Tri-Tip.

A couple of pieces of advice: make more marinade than you think you'll need (I usually double the recipe) because you have to reduce it and glaze the steak as it's cooking. I always wait to glaze until the last 10 minutes or so, so that the glaze doesn't burn (due to all of the honey and juices in it) It's nice to have some extra glaze set aside, because you can serve it at the table if folks want more on their steak.

Hope you like it!

Cheers,

Micki
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Micki, aka Pastry Maven

"Yom-yom-yooom, ze chocolad!"
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--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--
Micki, aka Pastry Maven

"Yom-yom-yooom, ze chocolad!"
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post #3 of 12
I hate to sound boring here, but I honestly think a little oil, KS&P, then let that sucker rip at rocket high heat for a short amount of time.

Slice, shingle, enjoy. :D

p.s. Side suggestions anyone? I'm thinking asparagus....could just be cause it's been awhile since I've had some.
post #4 of 12

tri-tip

Bill-
I personally like to do a rub on my tri-tips- chopped onion, shallots, garlic, brown sugar, herbs, salt, pepper- almost whatever you want. Roast and enjoy. It gets a nice color too. You could always make a sauce too if you wanted.
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #5 of 12
Might not be what you have in mind for restaurant use, but I believe that is the cut of choice for most serious chili competitors.

Kevin

I like muskies.
post #6 of 12

Tri-tip

I love it grilled on the Weber. Indirect heat. About 45 minutes. Add some mesquite or hickory for a nice smokey flavor. Serve with veggie and starch or slice thin for sandwiches. Usually I apply a rub the day before. It's hard to miss with this cut of meat. Too bad the price has escalated in recent years. Of course the traditional Santa Maria style is to grill over oak firewood rather than charcoal, and serve with piquento beans.
post #7 of 12
I like to leave the cap on and make pot roast with em!
"Laissez Le Bon Temps Roule"
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"Laissez Le Bon Temps Roule"
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post #8 of 12
I sprinkle both sides with a little salt and allow it to rest about twenty minutes while the oven preheats and the cast iron skillet heats up. Then I drop it into the smokin' hot cast iron skillet and leave it undisturbed for three minutes. I turn it over with tongs and leave it another three minutes, then place it into a 375 degree oven for about five minutes (depending on how thick it is) or until the internal temperature reaches 145 - 150 degrees +/- then remove it from the oven and allow it to rest for ten minutes before cutting (cross grain) into tender juicy strips. No sauce ... there's nothing to hide so I don't' need sauce. :beer:
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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post #9 of 12
Interesting how that cut is spreading. It was a commonplace on the west coast when we were there- went to a fund-raiser barbecue in the Santa Maria Valley in the early 1970's for (gasp!) Ronald Regan for Gov of CA. It was late in my tranistion from liberal Democrat to hidebound conservative. Older and wiser- whatever :smoking:

I still remember how nice that BBQ was, and now it's showing up here in Flyover Country. Even Trader Joe's offers that particular cut. Up until maybe last year or so, nobody here offered it, or had ever heard of it. Don't see it yet in supermarkets, but specialty markets have relatively suddenly offered it.

Mike :cool:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #10 of 12
Mike- here in CA, tri-tip is in about every grocery store on any given day- from $2.99- 5.99 /lb. Even Costco sells marinated Harris Ranch tri-tips. Couldn't imagine a summer without at least a few on the grill!
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #11 of 12
My TriTip recipe is pretty easy.

Rub

1 Cup Chef Merito's Carne Season salt
1/2 cup garlic
1/2 cup Pepper.

Rub meat.

Start BBQ using Mesquite Chunks. Set up your Weber BBQ indirect. Sear all 4 sides of the TriTip. Then roast away from the coals 20-40 minutes until 120 for Rare.

Let sit. Cut across the grain (the grain changes midway through the cut)
post #12 of 12
Tri Tips are one of my favorite steaks to make, they are flavorful, easy, and delicous. I like to season mine with chili powder, salt, pepper, onion, powder, and garlic powder, as well as some dried oregano. Let it sit out for some time, because when you put an icy cold steak on the grill it tends to make it tough. I grill it until medium-rare, then let it sit out for 10 minutes for the juices can redistribute. Really easy, really quick, affordable, and delicous. You can put it in tacos, serve it with BBQ sauce, or ground it up for a burger. Tri Tip is truly an awesome steak. I usually like to brush mine with BBQ sauce every time I flip it over, so it gets more flavor.
Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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