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Conut recipe? NOT coconut

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I purchased a product called "conut" to make chocolate peanut butter cups from a candy making store. The product looked to be about the consistency of crisco and indeed it might be part of the product. A very small amount of this was used in the recipe (about 1 tablespoon per 1 pound of chocolate melts).

Anyone know what the makeup of this product is?
post #2 of 14
Doesn't it say on the ingredients list?

Jock
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

conut

this was a product made by the store...no ingredient list
post #4 of 14
I found this phrase in relation to conut: Cocos nucifera

Don't know the significance yet, but I'll keep digging.
post #5 of 14
And that comes back to coconut again.

What was the grocery store?
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 

conut

this is a small shop that sells candy making supplies - candy melts, molds, supplies in general - and this conut stuff...the problem with buying it is that i don't use it often enough and the stuff goes rancid, so i'd like to be able to make up the stuff when i need it so i make only what i need

i often wondered what would happen if i just eliminated the conut from the recipe, but i'm afraid to waste the ingredients in case it doesn't work out

i do not know what the purpose of this product is...does it make the chocolate set up better or does it give it a creamier texture or something else!?!?!?!

the name certainly indicates that there is some type of coconut substance in it, but as i said, it has the consistency of crisco...because it goes rancid i suspect that there must be crisco in the product
post #7 of 14

Conut?

It's probably a hydrogenated vegetable fat blend, maybe based on coconut oil or palm oil (which has a higher melting point) whose purpose is to assist the setting and appearance of the chocolate at room temperature without having to go through the convoluted process of tempering the chocolate.

If this stuff goes rancid quickly, there may not be much coconut oil in it, despite the name. Coconut oil is pretty stable, and keeps for ages.
post #8 of 14
Lavern,
If you post your recipe and maybe in the baking threads there will be someone who can tell you if you can eliminate or not. Someone might even have a storable substitute.
I think all the posts here are right. It's probably a fat. If the store is repackaging the item then ask for the ingredients. Who knows, they might be renamed crisco:eek:
pan

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post #9 of 14
Lavern,

In this day and age, the store should be more than happy to tell you exactly what the ingredients are which comprise that item. It's good customer service and anyone with food allergies should not be hesitant to inquire.
post #10 of 14
I think Jacaranda may be right. I went on a conut (snipe?) search again this morning and only found: Comité de la ONU contra la Tortura (CONUT) :eek:
post #11 of 14
I'm going with Jacaranda on this one as well. Coconut oil as was stated is used in making hard shell chocolates without going through the process of tempering (Think "Instant Shell" chocolate covering)
Believe it or not this topic has come up before on Cheftalk, a long time ago!
http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/archi...hp?t-2622.html
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #12 of 14
It sounds like coconut oil, which has the consistency of Crisco. Coconut oil (which is very healthy, by the way, despite its bad reputation) has a definite coconut-y smell and, as previously mentioned, it does not go bad. Is it possible that the product in question is coconut oil mixed with lard or beef tallow?

I'm planning to make a pie crust using whole spelt flour and coconut oil as the sole fat. I'll let you know how it turns out.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 

conut

Thank you all for your input. This is the first time I've ever posted a question on one of these types of sites. You have all been very kind.

I think my best bet is to go to the store and question the ingredients and go from there. Or perhaps I should just put my recipe out there and maybe somone who has worked with the candy melts can give me some insight into a substitution for the conut.

If anyone ever comes across anything about this type of product, please don't hesitate to let me know. I'll let you know if I find out anything.

Thank you all again!
post #14 of 14
That's what these forums are for. ;)

Why not do both? It's the best way to learn.
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