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I need a customer's viewpoint

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm kind of taking a poll amongst foodies, if you have time between now and Sunday to tell me what you think, it'd be a great help.

The question would be, what would you consider Asian-French fusion to be?
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post #2 of 14
Vietnamese-influenced food, or any other nation where the French had colonial influence. (My Romanian grandmother called this region "French Indoor China".)

If I heard a place had French-Asian fusion food, I'd expect the flavors of Southeast Asia with perhaps some French saucing and techniques. I'd still have a hard time marrying cheese with Asian cuisine though.
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post #3 of 14
Hi Greg :)

I know this is hardly an answer to your question. But I would rather see an emphasis on the execution, rather than where lines are drawn.

good luck!
dan
post #4 of 14
I'm with Mezz, Vietnamese makes sense.....
.....Spring roll with confit...
french bread with pate and greens...
Vietnamese coffee brulee
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post #5 of 14
Ahhh "Fresion" :look: I'm with Mezz and Shroom on this one as well. I would expect that you could also take Asian techniques and marry them with French style ingredients as well. Velvet Bresse Chicken studded with Duck Confit and Broad beans just to name a thought. You get the picture. I mean if you think about it many itmes are similar already. For instance Cassoulet and Congee.. Anyway, if you come up with a menu I would love to see it.
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #6 of 14
Confused.

Seriously, 99% of the 'fusion' dishes I've tried have been garbage. The flavours of these 2 cuisines just don't match very well IMO. You can however apply the techniques from French cuisine to Asian cooking pretty well, and vise-versa. But keep the flavours clear and un-muddled, if that makes any sense. If I see soy beurre-blanc 1 more time I'm going to lose it....
post #7 of 14
I'm thinking Asian ingredients, French techniques. At least, adding Asian flavors to mostly French-style dishes. Mainly, I think of Jean-George Vongerichten and Gray Kunz.
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post #8 of 14
Surely the first step will have to be to S+P the meat BEFORE cooking!
post #9 of 14
Absolutely agree... this is exactly what "fusion" means, imo.
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post #10 of 14
i surrender a billion times!
post #11 of 14
Tough question Greg. These two cusines vary so much in tradition and techniques that marrying them together seems futile. I do agree with Chrose and shroom though. I do believe if one could master the art and techniques involved in both cuisines they could be applied equally.Don't know, just hard to fanthom French vs Asian together might just be me. Like your question though it gets you to thinking about various other cusines and how they may interwine. Might ought to read one of Anthony Bourdains books his travels may enlighten the subject.

Rgds Rook
post #12 of 14
Interesting thing is, however that as said above modern Vietnamese is a "fusion" of French and local tastes. Fusion happens whenever people of multiple cultures intermingle and communicate. Pho and Bahn Mi are just two of many examples of where French/Vietnamese fusion has occurred. It may not be expensive plates with fancy drizzles, but it is still fusion. Like Korean food without the use of hot peppers or Southern Italian food without the tomato "fusion" is always happening, whether in a downscale or upscale restaurant/home.
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #13 of 14
Agree!

Rgds Rook
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you, Captain Obvious!:smoking:

And thank you, everyone else. I've got an interview for an exec sous position tomorrow. The chef of a local restaurant called Azia is opening a new place with this focus. Doc and Kuan: It's in Loring Park in what used to be Tiburon.
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