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Top 3 Questions

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ultimately, what do you think are the most important considerations? If you or someone you loved were planning a culinary career and reviewing culinary schools (going to open houses etc.) - and could ask the admissions department up to 3 questions (not including tuition), what would they be?
post #2 of 10
#1 What is the average Chef-to-Student ratio per class?

#2 What does this specific school have to offer that competing schools cannot? (If it is a LCB school, insist on a more solid answer than the generic "Prestige of the LCB Program")

#3 Ask to speak with a student and ask the student about their feelings about the school/program (Preferrably private if possible, so the student doesn't feel pressured into saying good things just because the admission's rep. is there)
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Those are good questions :) During the open house (only one so far) that I was on last Saturday there was no formal opportunity given to ask the current students any questions. I suppose I'll be bolder this Saturday and ask for the opportunity.
Thanks a lot!
post #4 of 10

question #4

I would add a #4. If $ is an issue, ask about grants. Most schools (other than community colleges) run $25,000 plus. Repaying a student loan at $10/hr is tough, and a reality. I was able to obtain a few grants that reduced the amount of $ I had to borrow.

Fit Family Nutrition

FitFamilyNutrition@gmail.com

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Fit Family Nutrition

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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am cutting and pasting, open house #2 tomorrow - in spite of the driving rain and gale force winds :look:
post #6 of 10

School??

well,
1- I would want to know what support you get after school is over regarding work placement?

2- I would want to know if there is chances to do after school events that would teach you work skills?

and yes, as mentioned before, talking to students may help although they don't really know yet a good or bad that culinary program is?

good luck,
Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
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Martin Laprise
Author of "My daughter wants to Be a Chef!"
www.thechefinstead.ca

“A cook who invest a few bucks every week is a smart cook"
Reply
post #7 of 10
If it's not too late, my list of questions would include:

1. What proportion of students graduate and go on to jobs in the industry?
2. What proportion of graduates are still working in the industry after five years, and at what levels?
3. What connections do the chef-instructors have to the real-world industry? (This is important because they are in a much better position to evaluate your skills and recommend you for jobs than the placement people.)

And Laprise's questions are excellent, too.

But frankly, I wouldn't bother talking to students, unless you can find one or more who fit your same profile in background, interest, and aspirations. What I WOULD do, and did when I was looking at schools more than 10 years ago, was observe at least one class, to see if the teaching style and content jibed with my learning style and what I wanted to learn.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #8 of 10
I'd ask about school time schedules? flexibility? events or training outside of regular class hours?

Post- graduation job placement assistance? or restaurant launching assistance (if applicable)?

And even though you said "other than tuition"- THAT ($$) is a big factor- are there scholarships available? other expenses beyond tuition- personal equipment or uniforms that aren't provided?

Best bet is to tour, sit in or visit a class and/or lab- get a feel for it- is this an environment that you are going to feel comfortable learning?
Good luck!
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #9 of 10
I'm with Suzanne,
I want to know how many instructors are from the field and how many came up in school?

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #10 of 10
Agree with all of the previous points...
Other questions which are worth consideration...
#...How many years of experience do the instructors have???
#...Where have they worked???
#...Have any competed and won, and at what level, i.e., international, national or regional???
Other things to look for when touring schools...
1. what is the food budget per student...could tell you alot about what you will be working with...(does every student get a lobster or does the instructor get one to demonstrate)
2. amount of smallwares, (tongs, ladles, spoons, sheet pans, saute pans) available for student use
3. look at the cleanliness of the students uniforms, aprons, shoes...this says alot about professionalism
4. take a look in the classrooms...what types of technology are used in lecture/demo rooms...
5. type of equipment used in the kitchens, (tilt skillets, walk ins, island stoves)
This is the second major expense in your life, besides purchasing a house...
DO NOT leave the school until all of your questions are answered...
Best of luck...
Andrew Nutter C.C.C., C.C.E., F.M.P.
Chef Instructor
IUP Academy of Culinary Arts
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
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Andrew Nutter C.C.C., C.C.E., F.M.P.
Chef Instructor
IUP Academy of Culinary Arts
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
Reply
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