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Sugar in Glue Gun

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I would like to try sugar in a glue gun. I am assuming that I would put molded sugar in a high temp gun? Has anyone done this and do you have any hints?
post #2 of 12
Only a guess here, but I'm thinking it wouldn't work. The glue guns I am familiar with use "sticks" of hard glue. How they are made, I don't know. But it has a place to put it and as it hits the heating element it melts and dries almost instantly (the stick part that is). So even if you could get a piece that small I am not sure the gun would even generate enough heat to melt the sugar efficiently. If you are looking to use it as a source of "sugar glue" to bond pieces perhaps you can roll or pull a bunch of "sticks" and dry them. Then when you need to use them use them much like a welder and use a small butane torch and a piece of the sugar to glue. Assuming of course this is what you're trying to accomplish. By the way, "what are you trying to accomplish"?
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #3 of 12
You can't control the temp. in a glue gun.
post #4 of 12
I can tell you that it works as I watched the team from Japan do this at the World Pastry Championship in Las Vegas a few years ago. They made silicone molds of glue sticks & then cast them with either sugar or isomalt. All of the judges gathered around their booth as they couldn't believe they were using a glue gun to assemble their showpiece, and then they realized that it wasn't hot glue, it was sugar. Like I said, I haven't done it myself, but yes it can be done.
Everybody's got to elevate from the norm.
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Everybody's got to elevate from the norm.
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post #5 of 12
Be easier just to boil a sugar recipe and use the melted sugar that way if all your using it for is glue. I am sure there was more to the Japanese technique than they showed in the Pastry Championship. I do not know if you were there in person or not but if you were wished I'd have been you.
Secondly, watching this stuff on TV is a definite drawback because all your going to get is bits and pieces of whats going on and it leaves you wondering how they did that? A Pastry Chefs techniques are a lot like a magicians tricks some of them are best left to the imagination. Not saying it cannot be done because like you said the Japanese did it but it just seems like a lot of trouble. By the way where did they finish in that championship?

Rgds Rook
post #6 of 12
I feel sure it would work in a high temp gun - they get up to 180-200º C. An awful lot of trouble, though, casting/pulling cylindrical sugar sticks the same diameter as solid glue sticks in order to melt them effectively.

My only concern would be the metal of the heating element and nozzle, which of course aren't designed to be food safe. I'm no chemist, but I guess there may be a theoretical chance that if they contain alloys or plating of potentially toxic/allergenic metals such as chromium, nickel or zinc, traces could be transferred into the sugar at high temperatures.

Are you looking for short-cuts for assembling pastillage etc?
post #7 of 12
it's a nice idea but the fact of the matter is that a paper cone is going to be faster, more sanitary, and easier to clean. I'll put up a bag against a gun anytime. Really!!!! even for money!! just in case FN is reading:D
pan

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #8 of 12
Agree Pan 100%.

Rgds Rook
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys...I have no immediate need but my thought process was that it would be there "as needed". While a bag would work fine, it can cool off fast when off to the side. I tend to be anal about my stuff and having it ready and waiting appeals to that side of me. If I decide to try it, I will let you know.
post #10 of 12
AMW,
Never knocking ideas!!! Great idea. I was just responding to 'as seen on FN'.
I'm always looking for new things.
I agree on the co0oling. I have made a few metal cones with a foot tacked to the bottom so they stand. If I'm doing decorations, I leave them in the bags in the cones under the lamp.
BTW Rook turned me on to a dimmer switch on the lamps. Works great.
I have also run strands for glueing. I let them cool. Then lay them for glueing and put them back in the box till soft. I'm able to put more sections together that way.
pan
Sorry chatty this morning.
AMW,
I just wanted to mention you being anal about sugar. I spent a couple of days watching Notter teach a large class. The most important thing I learned was. It's kind of like yeast. You have to work the sugar, the sugar can't work you. You should not chase the yeast, the yeast should be chasing you. I think you are right on the money and I think that is the only thing that people get frustrated with, their chasing the sugar.

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Panini,

Funny you should say that....it is my biggest downfall. Sugar frustrates me too much as the working time is so short. I much prefer working with gumpaste as it gives me so much more time to tweak!! I am concerned that I will never trully master it because of perfectionist tendencies. Hopefully experience will win.
post #12 of 12
AMW do not, I repeat do not give up. As Pan once told me "this is not an easy art or everyone would be doing it" unquote. Let your fingers and imagination rule your work. Its fine to try and copy others sugar art but yours will be different in every aspect because your hard work and determination went into it. Chef Martin Chiffers has an article at www.pastrychef.info read it I thnik it will help you a lot. I am a big believer in the pastry arts not just sugar but the entire field.So if you an have questions come here with all the knowledge and wisdom here at Cheftalk I am sure we can talk you through most anything. Plus I have an article on sugar work at my blog if you would like to read that at http://bakingtravels.blogspot.com

Rgds Rook
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