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Broken Cheese

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I was preparing a cheese sauce this evening and made the mistake of allowing the milk to become overheated. Added the grated cheddar cheese and, bingo, broken sauce. Glumps of cheese in a bath of cheese colored milk. I've had a few similar experiences in the past (fondue, etc.) which resulted in my simply throwing the mess in the garbage and starting over.
This evening I decided to experiment with a solution and, IT WORKED. So I thought I'd share it here.
I simply allowed the milk/cheese mess to cool from its "hot" condition to a temperature closer to that at which I might have originally added the cheese successfully. I then poured the mess into my blender, started on low speed and then immediately to a medium speed. I allowed the machine to run about a minute, then poured out a beautiful sauce.
It's a tip that some of you may have already recorded in your cookbooks. But I had never heard of it before I got the good results I achieved today so I hope this hint helps someone else who may run up against this problem in the future. :lips:
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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post #2 of 8
That's a great idea. I found i get that problem if i add the cheese too early and stir too much. It sort of coagulates.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #3 of 8
thats a good idea, i never looked at it like that.
another way of doing it is to pass it through a cheese cloth or a sieve much like a broken anglais or hollandaise. then incorporate more cheese, such as your case. that way, if you were to boil it again the proteins wouldn't split so quickly
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Great tip;thanks. I hadn't tried your process but you can be sure that I will file it in my cooking trouble-shooting library.
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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post #5 of 8

cheese!

well at least somebody's cheese coagulated today!
post #6 of 8
Split my sauce for the first time in a long time, not concentrating. Food processor worked a treat - thanks!
post #7 of 8

What you did was emulsufy all the components together. The oils with the water content  like a hollandaise or mayonaise or salad dressing/  Very good and you used your head to figure it out.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #8 of 8

Did you start with a roux?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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