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Lost in measures! tablespoon of butter?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hello,. how are you? I have some american books, I was checking about an apple pie. Well my problem is the measure, I dont know how to measure a Tspoon of butter, or flour or sugar, how can I do it? I have many tspoons at house and all of them are diffrent,how can I get 2 tspoons of butter? Do I have to extract the butter with the spoon? Here we use metric, Kilograms, grams. And I have the same problem with cups, I have been checking conversions but all of them say diffrent things, could you suggest me any webside? or any suggestion. Thanks so much. By the way, my apple pie smells good, hehe, kind regards and smile!

Gustavo from Peru
post #2 of 24
I understand the problem. My relatives in the UK have the same problem. Here in the US there are standard cup and spoon measures that you can buy. I would recommend finding a web site (like Sur la Table.com or cooking.com or something similar - I don't shop the web so I don't know too many) and buying a set. They are not expensive.

Our butter typically comes in 4 ounce (113g) blocks. There are 8 tablespoons in a block so each tablespoon (Tbs) is 1/2 ounce or 14g.

Jock
post #3 of 24
Tbl (tablespoon) 15 ML
tsp (teaspoon) 5 ML
Cup 240 ML

Hope that helps?
Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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post #4 of 24
I encountered a similar problem when I was given a recipe by a French friend. I was told to measure a "glass" (un verre du.....) of some liquid (broth, I believe). That's not a standard cooking measure in the U.S. Next time I visited her I brought an American cookbook with homestyle recipes, a set of standard measuring spoons and measuring cups. She was able to enjoy the cookbook and I could convert her "glass" and other amounts to my measures. (By the way, a "glass" is 6 fluid ounces.) I can send her more cookbooks, knowing she has the proper measures. :bounce:
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post #5 of 24

Do you have a proper set of measures?

TB, tsp, half, quarter, eights? (actually I have a set that says smidgen, pinch and dash...LOL) <no, really...it's true>

I'm assuming you're referring to standard kitchen spoons when you say they're all different?

A Tablespoon is 3 teaspoons. When you measure you scoop the butter then scrape the excess flat across the top. What's left is an exact TB or tsp or whatever.

We lived in Australia a number of years so I had to get used to kilos and liters and all but never had to translate TB and tsps into anything.

April
post #6 of 24
My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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My failures in life are few. The most blatant of these is my attempts at retirement. I've studied the process carefully but cannot begin to understand how it is done.
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post #7 of 24
it's always a good practice to change over formulas that you like to weight.

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #8 of 24
Metric! :)
post #9 of 24
To my certain knowledge only in North America are cup and spoon sizes standardized for the kitchen. In Britain for example, a cup is what you drink your tea from and a teaspoon is what you use to stir the tea. And they are different sizes. Recipes never call for cup measures but always weight and since most homes do not boast a scale some improvization is necessary. A heaped tablespoon (not our standard but a particular kind of spoon sold there) of flour weighs an ounce for example. Teaspoon measures are described as Heaped, Rounded, Level or fractions. The home cook just knows from long experience how their spoon sizes work in a recipe. When non Americans see a recipe asking for a cup of something, they look in their crockery cupboard with 3 different cups and say, Which one?

Jock
post #10 of 24
Bugger all that:lol: , I'm with Kuan - just go metric and get on with life!!!!:D
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #11 of 24
I've been reading The Epicurean and wondered what a "gill" was. I think it's a half a pint.
post #12 of 24

Yes definitely with the weight.

It's far more accurate. You know that one gram is exactly one gram whereas a 'cup' measured could vary depending on how you measure, the humidity, all kinds of factors.

However, the question was about spoon measures. Here it works for dense, like shortening, and liquid ingredients. You aren't beholden to how the person "firmly packs" the brown sugar or how the sifted flour was sifted.

I agree that it would all be best left to weight. Little digi scales are pretty inexpensive now.

April
post #13 of 24
FreeRider: In the U.S., a "gill" is a 1/2 cup, thus a 1/4 of a pint (4 fluid ounces). However, in the U.K. Imperial System, the "gill" 5 fluid ounces (but still a 1/4 of a pint). Go figure!!
post #14 of 24
April,
Even spoon measures are innacurate when dealing with dry goods.
I will have to amend my signature to rid the globe of these instruments of evil!!:D :D :D
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #15 of 24
That's because an Imperial pint is 20 fl oz.

Jock
post #16 of 24
While I'll agree weight is the way to go I have to admit for small batches, with some ingredients (chemical leavenings, spices and the like) I find myself converting some things back to spoons.

I don't know about you, but I don't want to try to weigh out .17 ounces (4.75g) of baking soda when I can just grab a standardized teaspoon!
Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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Erik

"Health nuts are going to feel stupid one day, lying in the hospital dying of nothing"
-Redd Foxx
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post #17 of 24
Gus, go online, find a cookware vendor, and buy a couple of American measuring devices. Get a two cup measuring cup, and a set of spoons. Can't cost much, and its a lot better than trying to do conversions.

I don't find many recipes that are really 'quantity critical' though. Almost every recipe is tolerant of a bit of deviation from what is printed. Even when baking, if you have any experience at all, you should have a feel for what is right. Its a rare thing for me to actually follow a recipe, and use exactly what it calls for.
post #18 of 24
Eric,
small digital scales are getting cheaper and cheaper. I would certainly use those for smaller weights, plus it's easier. Weight on item, hit the tear and do a second on a different part of the platform. Just make sure you have the one that will give you oz. gr. without clearing. Makes converting easier too.
Just my 2 kilos:D
I've found some really nice scales and thermometers on ebay for a great price.

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is To Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #19 of 24
Giddyup!!:D :D :D
Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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Leading the global ban on cup and spoon measurements in recipes!
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post #20 of 24

Peruvian Chefs?

HELLO

I'M PERUVIAN AND I'M LOOKING FOR A PERUVIAN CHEF FOR MY RESTAURANT IN MANHATTAN - NEW YORK.

PLEASE IF YOU KNOW SOMEBODY FOR THIS POSITION. LET ME KNOW TO
nycrestchef@yahoo.com

THANK YOU,
post #21 of 24
This should help you too. Good charts on this site..

http://www.pastryscoop.com/member/li...ns.html#volume
post #22 of 24
I run into the same problems because I have both US and international recipes- Since the US measures everything in volume it is sometimes hard to convert to weight. The 2 biggest problems are usually flour and sugar: maybe this will help: Flour: 1 cup= 5ozs (weight) = 140g
3 1/2 c= 16oz (1 lb)= 490g

Sugar: 1 cup= 7oz= 200g
2 c= 13 1/2 oz. =400g
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #23 of 24
This also changes depending on what type of flour or sugar is being used..

Flour.... Conversions from Volume to Weight
All-purpose Flour, sifted
1 tablespoon = 3/8 ounce = 5 grams
1/4 cup = 1 ounce = 25 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 30 grams
1/2 cup = 2 ounces = 50 grams
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 ounces = 65 grams
3/4 cup = 3 ounces = 70 grams
1 cup = 4 ounces = 95 grams All-purpose Flour, unsifted
1 tablespoon = 1/4 ounce = 7.5 grams
1/4 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 31 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/2 ounces = 42 grams
1/2 cup = 2 1/2 ounces = 63 grams
2/3 cup = 3 1/4 ounces = 75 grams
3/4 cup = 3 1/2 ounces = 85 grams
1 cup = 4 1/4 ounces = 125 grams
3 cups = 16 ounces = 1 pound Bread Flour
1/4 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 30 grams
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 45 grams
1/2 cup = 2 1/2 ounces = 60 grams
2/3 cup = 3 1/4 ounces = 75 grams
3/4 cup = 3 3/4 ounces = 75 grams
1 cup = 5 ounces = 110 grams Buckwheat Flour, unsifted
1/4 cup = 1 ounce = 25 grams
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 45 grams
1/2 cup = 2 ounces = 50 grams
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 ounces = 65 grams
3/4 cup = 3 ounces = 70 grams
1 cup = 4 ounces = 95 grams Cake Flour, sifted
1/4 cup = 1 ounce = 25 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 30 grams
1/2 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 45 grams
2/3 cup = 2 1/4 ounces = 55 grams
3/4 cup = 2 1/2 ounces = 60 grams
1 cup = 3 1/2 ounces = 82.5 grams Cake Flour, unsifted
1/4 cup = 1 ounce = 25 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 30 grams
1/2 cup = 2 ounces = 50 grams
2/3 cup = 2 3/4 ounces = 65 grams
3/4 cup = 3 ounces = 70 grams
1 cup = 4 ounces = 95 grams Pasta Flour, Finely Ground Durum Wheat
1/4 cup = 1 1/2 ounces = 40 grams
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 45 grams
1/2 cup = 2 3/4 ounces = 65 grams
2/3 cup = 3 3/4 ounces = 75 grams
3/4 cup = 4 ounces = 95 grams
1 cup = 5 1/2 ounces = 122.5 grams Whole-Wheat Flour, sifted
1/4 cup = 1 1/4 ounce = 30 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/2 ounces = 40 grams
1/2 cup = 2 1/4 ounces = 55 grams
2/3 cup = 3 ounces = 70 grams
3/4 cup = 3 1/4 ounces = 75 grams
1 cup = 4 1/2 ounces = 102.5 grams Whole-Wheat Flour, unsifted
1/4 cup = 1 1/2 ounces = 40 grams
1/3 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 45 grams
1/2 cup = 2 3/4 ounces = 65 grams
2/3 cup = 3 3/4 ounces = 75 grams
3/4 cup = 4 ounces = 95 grams
1 cup = 5 1/2 ounces = 122.5 grams Flour SubstitutionsInstead of 1 CupYou Can UseCake flour1 cup minus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flourSelf-rising flour1 cup all-purpose flour plus 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder and 1/8 teaspoon saltSifted all-purpose1 cup minus 2 tablespoons unsifted all-purposed flourSifted cake flour1 cup minus 2 tablespoons unsifted cake flourWhole-wheat flour1/8 cup all-purpose flour plus 2 tablespoons wheat germ Flour Protein ContentFlour type Protein (g/cup)Bread14Unbleached13All-Purpose10-12Southern All-Purpose9Cake8
Sugar....

Conversions from Volume to Weight
Granulated White Sugar
1 teaspoon = 1/6 ounce = 4 grams
1 tablespoon = 1/2 ounce = 12 grams
1/4 cup = 1 3/4 ounces = 50 grams
1/3 cup = 2 1/4 ounces = 67 grams
1/2 cup = 3 1/2 ounces = 100 grams
1/3 cup = 4 1/2 ounces = 150 grams
3/4 cup = 5 1/4 ounces = 170 grams
1 cup = 7 ounces = 200 grams
2 cups = 1 pound = 500 grams Brown Sugar, dark or light
1 tablespoon = 1/2 ounce = 14 grams
1/4 cup = 2 ounces = 55 grams
1/3 cup = 2 1/2 ounces = 63 grams
1/2 cup = 4 ounces = 110 grams
2/3 cup = 5 1/2 ounces = 135 grams
3/4 cup = 6 ounces = 150 grams
1 cup = 8 ounces = 220 grams Confectioners' (Powdered) Sugar or 10X Sugar
1 tablespoon = 1/4 ounce = 7.5 grams
1/4 cup = 1 ounce = 30 grams
1/3 cup = 1 1/4 ounces = 40 grams
1/2 cup = 2 ounces = 60 grams
2/3 cup = 2 1/2 ounces = 75 grams
3/4 cup = 3 ounces = 85 grams
1 cup = 4 ounces = 120 grams Honey
1 tablespoon = 3/4 fl. ounce = 21.25 g.
1/4 cup = 3 fl. ounces = 85 grams
1/3 cup = 4 fl. ounces = 113 grams
1/2 cup = 6 fl. ounces = 170 grams
2/3 cup = 8 fl. ounces = 226 grams
3/4 cup = 9 fl. ounces = 255 grams
1 cup = 12 fl. ounces = 340 grams Corn Syrup, dark or light
1 tablespoon = 3/4 fl. ounce = 20.5 grams
1/4 cup = 3 fl. ounces = 82 grams
1/3 cup = 4 fl. ounces = 109.3 grams
1/2 cup = 6 fl. ounces = 164 grams
2/3 cup = 8 fl. ounces = 218.6 grams
3/4 cup = 9 fl. ounces = 246 grams
1 cup = 11 1/2 fl. ounces = 328 grams Molasses
1/4 cup = 2 3/4 fl. ounces = 77.9 grams
1/3 cup = 3 3/4 fl. ounces = 103.8 grams
1/2 cup = 5 1/2 fl. ounces = 155.8 grams
2/3 cup = 7 1/2 fl. ounces = 207.4 grams
3/4 cup = 8 1/4 fl. ounces = 233.7 grams
1 cup = 11 fl. ounces = 311.6 grams Maple Syrup
1 tablespoon = 3/4 fl. ounce = 20.5 grams
1/4 cup = 3 fl. ounces = 82 grams
1/3 cup = 4 fl. ounces = 109.3 grams
1/2 cup = 6 fl. ounces = 164 grams
2/3 cup = 8 fl. ounces = 218.6 grams
3/4 cup = 9 fl. ounces = 246 grams
1 cup = 12 fl. ounces = 340 grams Sugar SubstitutionsInstead of 1 CupYou Can UseConfectioners' (powdered) sugar1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon granulated sugarDark corn syrup3/4 light corn syrup plus 1/4 cup light molassesGranulated sugar1 3/4 cups confectioners' sugar or 1 cup packed brown sugar or 1 cup superfine sugarHoney1 1/4 cups granulated sugar plus 1/4 cup waterLight-brown sugar1 cup granulated sugar plus 1 tablespoon or 1/2 cup packed brown sugar plus 1/2 cup granulated sugar Light/dark corn syrup1 1/4 cups granulated or packed brown sugar plus 1/4 cup waterMolasses3/4 cup dark-brown sugar plus 1/4 cup water or 1 cup honey Sugar NameSugar DefinitionBeet SugarSugar extracted from the sugar beet plant. Sugar beets are easier to grow and more prolific than the sugar cane plant.Brown SugarA small-grained, granulated sugar that is combined with molasses giving it a soft texture. Light brown sugar has less molasses added than dark brown sugar.Cane SugarSugar that is extracted from the sugar cane plant. Raw cane sugar has a more pleasant flavor than raw beet sugar, but it is more expensive to produce.Confectioners' SugarGranulated sugar that has been crushed into a fine powder. A small amount of cornstarch is usually added to prevent clumping.Corn SyrupSweet syrup made from cornstarch. Dark corn syrup has had caramel flavor and coloring added. Corn syrup will inhibit crystallization of sugar.Decorating (sugar crystals or coarse sugar)A sugar that has granules about four times larger than regular granulated sugar. It is used for decorating baked goods and often comes in a variety of colors.DemeraraA coarse-grained, light brown raw cane sugar from the Demarara region of Guyana. It is relatively dry and dissolves slowly.Granulated A highly refined cane or beet sugar that is most common for table use and cooking. It is available in various textures, as well as tablets and cubes.HoneyA sweet, sticky liquid made by bees from the nectar of flowers.Maple SugarSugar made from the syrup of the sugar maple tree.Maple SyrupA sweet syrup made from the sap of the hardwood sugar maple and black maple.MuscovadoA dark, raw cane sugar with fine grains and a moist texture.Turbinado SugarA coarse-grained granulated sugar that is less refined. A small amount of molasses remains after cleaning, giving turbinado sugar a light brown color.MolassesA syrup by-product of processed cane sugar. It is dark, viscous, and has a strong, distinctive flavor.GlucoseA simple sugar that occurs naturally in fruits, vegetables, and honey, is used in making sugarpaste and it helps prevent sugar recrystalilation. It can be made commercially by heating starch with various acids.SugarA sweet-tasting carbohydrate that forms naturally in the leaves, roots, stems or fruits of numerous plants.SuperfineA finely granulated sugar which dissolves almost instantly in cold water. Superfine sugar can be substituted for regular granulated sugar cup for cup.Castor SugarA term used in Britain for superfine sugar.DextroseA form of glucose created when cornstarch is broken down into a simple sugar by enzymes.FructoseOccurs naturally in all fruits and in honey. It is approximately twice as sweet as granulated sugar.Treacle, BlackA thick, dark syrup with a strong, slightly bitter flavor. It is very similar to dark molasses.JaggeryA dark brown, raw Asian sugar with coarse, moist grains. It has a strong molasses taste and is used in South Asian cuisines.
post #24 of 24
Oops! Sorry about that. The lists did not post the way I thought they would!
Hope you can understand them anyway..:crazy:
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