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Least Favorite Foods - Page 2

post #31 of 82
As an avid vegetable gardener, I can say that anyone who does not like brussels sprouts has not had home grown, freshly harvested sprouts which have been nipped by frost to make them sweeter.

Quickly sauteed with butter or olive oil along with a bit of cardamom is the classic secret. They should be crunchy, sweet, and stunning. Not bitter and mushy.
post #32 of 82
Ah, the Haggis!

I cooked up a couple of authentic Haggises (spelling?), or at least as authentic as I could make them, including lungs etc. This was for my Boy Scout troop's Scottish Games.

As my son put it, the Haggis was "underwhelming." As he had actively participated in the cleaning of the innards and preparation of the Haggis, he was acutely aware of the "yuck" factor with regard to the color, feel and smell of said innards. He explained that if it tasted great, it would have been "cool" and if it had tasted horrible that would have been "even cooler."

However, it simply tasted bland.

That, of course, didn't stop the Scouts from digging in, if for bragging rights if nothing else.
post #33 of 82
Its a love hate sort of thing. I also like Boston market's ham. I feel embarassed- but I don't live in the south so I can't really tell what's a "good ham" and what's a "bad ham". Or Fried chicken, catfish, mashed potatoes, okra, or whatever. All i know is that its 10x better than deli ham, something that is dear to my heart. :lips:
Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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Meet Austin- destroyer of all picky eaters. He's watching you...
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post #34 of 82

Love Those Sprouts!

Well, I was a Brussels Sprout hater too, until I found this recipe...

MUSTARD AND HONEY-BRAISED BRUSSELS SPROUTS

1/3 cup Dijon mustard
1-1/2 TBSP honey
3 shallots, halved and thinly sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 TBSP unsalted butter
1 TBSP olive oil
1/2 cup dry sherry
1-1/2 lbs brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
1 cup chicken stock, preferably home-made
S & P to taste

Combine the mustard and honey and set aside.
In a large saute pan (actually, we usually use a wok), cook shallots and garlic in the butter and oil over moderate heat for 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Add sherry and cook 5 minutes, or until it has almost evaporated.
Add sprouts and chicken broth and bring to boil over high heat.Reduce heat to moderate, cover with tight-fitting lid, and cook 13 to 15 minutes, until sprouts are tender.
Remove lid, add honey-mustard mixture and cook 1 to 2 minutes over high heat, stirring frequently until the sauce coats the sprouts and is heated through.
Season with S & P and serve immediately.

It made a sprouts lover out of me.

Mike :roll:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #35 of 82
I think it depends on what part of the south you live in. I lived the first 24 years of my life in Southeastern Georgia (Vidalia area...where the onions are grown), and crawfish were not eaten around there. We used to catch them in the creek and in ditches as kids but we released them later. lol I had "heard" of people eating them but never saw and tried one until I moved to Indiana. lol
post #36 of 82
Me too, seafood specially ones with shells.
post #37 of 82
Ok my 10 cents on brussle sprouts. I cut them in 1/2 and blanch them in boiling water with suggar added (i also do this for broccoli rabe). Drain em and shock them. Then I chop some applewood bacon, onions, garlic, black pepper and salt. cook that down a bit in whole butter, toss in the sprouts and slow roast em in the oven till carmalized. I actually have to make a ton of these now for my non veggie eating frends at christmas time.
"Laissez Le Bon Temps Roule"
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"Laissez Le Bon Temps Roule"
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post #38 of 82
Thread Starter 
One man's poison is another man's meat; I happen to love lamb! In fact, it's probably my favorite meat.
Brussel Sprouts--I've had it a few times, and actually liked it!
post #39 of 82

Stuff I don't like and the ham I do!

I'm not a big vegetable lover to start with. I'll try most any vegetable raw. I like the veggies raw. The one veggie I can't stand is the food I despise the most. I can't stand broccoli. I don't like the taste, cooked or raw, and I absolutely can't stand the smell.

I love a country ham, and it has got to be hickory smoked and really smokey tasting. That is ham. When I moved away from the south, I tasted some ham, and couldn't figure out for the life of me what they had done to the ham and really couldn't figure out why it was sweet. I don't like any kind of sweet stuff on a ham. But then again, I don't like sweet stuff on meat, period. Sweet is for dessert and breakfast breads, not for stuff like meats.

Cheers,
Texasflute
Cheers,
texasflute
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Cheers,
texasflute
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post #40 of 82
'flute-
Get ahold of

Esicar's Old Hickory Smokehouse
1157 N Kingshighway St
Cape Girardeau, MO 63701

(573) 335-9283

and order a Christmas ham. They're very reasonably priced and, boy, they are SMOKED! Make sure to tell them to cook it for you, because cooking them is a real chore. They have to be completely submerged in water, and that takes a pan nearly as big as your bathtub, because what you get is not a dinky little ham, but the hind leg of a hog.

Right now they offer Christmas hams which have been hung up for as long as five or six months. The rest of the year, they just have hams hung for a couple of months. They are delicious, too, but not nearly as knarly as the long-hung Christmas hams.

They send them with preparation instructions, but if you or anybody else want a little explanation, PM me and I'll fill you in - I've been getting one every year for the past 20 or so.

They also have bacon, sausage, and smoked cheese (though the cheese is a process cheese, it's still pretty good.)

There are great country hams from Virginia, Maryland, and most southern states, I know, but I've got a soft spot for the Missouri hams, because my father's family farmed for generations near there and until a few years ago my uncle continued to dress his own pigs and cure them. That's where I got my first tast of MO country ham, when I was about two years old. I still clearly remember thinking there was no reason to eat anything else for the rest of my life.

I understand that in New Hampshire, they smoke their hams with corn cobs. Frankly, I do not know how to relate to this.

Mike :bounce:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #41 of 82

Food dislikes

Don't think I've seen this one yet - eggplant. Don't like the texture. Same for okra. Pickled okra is fine, but then it doesn't taste like okra, it tastes like a pickle. I don't like slimy food.

Can't see much point to raw octopus.

Liver I like ok, but the few times I've tried kidneys it tasted like liver that'd been peed on. Not my cuppa.

Turnips - blech.

The ultimate horror food would have to be Icelandic putrefied shark. I've never tried it, & if the opportunity arises, I will politely decline.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #42 of 82
I find that I only like eggplant if it's been cooked until it's really soft or if it's been vigorously deep fried... this removes the strange spongey resilient texture of an undercooked eggplant (which I see a lot with respect to grilled eggplant). If course that may be the texture you dislike in the first place.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #43 of 82
Eggplant happens to be one of my favourite vegetables. There are so many ways of preparing it. In Mediterranean dishes, it is best to deep fry it in batter and serve with a garlic dip, make a spread or to add to a mixed vegetable stew. In Asian cooking, it is used in vegetable curries and in stir fry dishes.
post #44 of 82
I'm hard-pressed as well to find foods I genuinely don't like. I'm not a fan of canned vegetables. I'm not a fan of liver unless it's cooked correctly. I HATE liver & onions together. I LOVE liverwurst. I love almost all fresh vegetables, even eggplant and brussel sprouts. I love seafood, but hate store-bought fish sticks. Parsnips are food of the gods.

One thing I really don't like is meatloaf. I make one with tomatoes that I can eat, but I end up using more crackers and it ends up more crackery than meaty.
post #45 of 82
Pickles. They're usually not offensive and easily removed, but I feel like they're just a vinegary garnish not meant to be enjoyed at all and sometimes the vinegar spoils they dish they're with.

Thank you for the opportunity to complain. :D
post #46 of 82
I'm not sure if they should be classified as food, but I don't like marshmallows. I'm not a big fan of sweet potatoes, either. I find the combination of the two offends my sensibilities. :D

Kevin

I like muskies, and I always put them back.
post #47 of 82
Ooh, you're right... I forgot about marshmallows. There's something about marshmallows that scares me.
post #48 of 82
I do like fudge, and try not to think about that alien white fluff included in a lot of fudge recipes. I envision it spreading and suffocating civilization in an unstoppable, sickly sweet, sticky white glacier. It would be more horrifying than another ice age. S'mores, Rice Crispie Treats, and worst of all, those dried little chunks in breakfast cereals, are all threats to humanity.

Kevin

I like muskies, and I always put them back.
post #49 of 82
I totally LOVE brussels sprouts. Quartered, drizzled with olive oil and sprinkled with salt and roasted. Mmmm.... I guess I'm really lucky that my husband likes them too. This has gotten me thinking about them. Might have to make some for Christmas Eve.

I also like okra. I've only ever had it the way my FIL makes it. Fried with cornmeal. I think I'm the only other one who really loves it. The rest of the family just eats a little to be polite. At the end of Thanksgiving, it's me and Gary munching on the leftover fried okra. I've heard that cooking it other ways makes a mucilage. But the fried okra I'm used to is dry and crunchy.

My dislikes

- canned green beans (is it just me or are they actually greyish?)

- iced coffee or coffee ice cream

- well-done steak - When we were first married my poor husband used to BBQ steak until it resurected like the pheonix and then died all over again. So nasty. (I wasn't too much better in the kitchen back then either, so I'm sure he has stories of his own...) But even I knew that a 1/2 inch steak didn't take a half hour on a blazing hot charcoal grill. :lol: And then there was the time when he did the same thing on the stovetop and then made a "gravy" out of the completely charred remnants. He was so proud of himself. Gack!!! It's one of those tastes that you can't ever quite get away from. Ash Gravy is NOT a thing one wants in their sensory memory. Trust me.

:D

Nancy
Loving my gluten-free life.
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Loving my gluten-free life.
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post #50 of 82
my wife is Icelandic, and hakarl (said decomposing shark) is a true experience that everyone should try once, just to say they've done it. kind of like sky diving. we keep a jar in the fridge most of the time.

it works best with a bit of brennivin- a sort of caraway vodka.

but I hate brussels sprouts too... in
post #51 of 82
Well... I would love to visit Iceland, and if I do, & if it's offered... I probably will try it. I fear the required amount of aquavit might make the experience rather blurry. But then, when it comes to eating rotten fish, I want things as blurry as possible.

What is that bright red Thai soup - "hot & sour seafood soup"? That stuff's pretty horrendous.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #52 of 82
Ok everyone inspired me to give the ole brussel sprout a try again- and..... I have to admit, I love them! Fresh- I blanched them, then sauteed with olive oil, butter and mushrooms- they were wonderful! Even served them with Christmas eve dinner- big hit! So I guess take the brussel sprouts off my dislike list!
Funny that several people mentioned marshmallows-- I have been a Girl Scout leader for years, so I guess because we make s'mores all the time, I have to appreciate the marshmallow- what other 1" long food can a child cover themselves in from head to toe...LOL Anyone remember the movie "Ghostbusters" and the Sta-puff marshmallow man?? LOL
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #53 of 82
I have a major aversion to mayonnaise. I won't even eat anything that appears like it might contain mayonnaise (salad dressings, dips, etc).
post #54 of 82
I have an aversion to mayonnaise too. I don't really like it, but what really puts me over the edge is that I break it every time I try to make it.:o
post #55 of 82

they dont "pep" me up

For me it has to be green peppers....funnily enough, I used to love brinjal but recently Im not so keen on it anymore, but green peppers takes the cake. Red and yellow are fine but NOT green.
post #56 of 82
Raw Onions, Calamari, Spinach, Shell Fish, Brussel Sprouts, Kalamata Olives, Dolamadas, Anchovies, snails and tofu.
Mike

“If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.” -- Zaphod Beeblebrox
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Mike

“If there's anything more important than my ego around, I want it caught and shot now.” -- Zaphod Beeblebrox
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post #57 of 82
Beets, Beets, Beets. I'd rather be beat with a slab of meat than eat a nasty, funky beet.
I AM THE DIRTY CHEF. THEDIRTYCHEF.BLOGSPOT.COM
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I AM THE DIRTY CHEF. THEDIRTYCHEF.BLOGSPOT.COM
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post #58 of 82
Wow, I love almost everything here that folks dislike. I can even eat marmite and I'm a total Yank. The only thing that comes to mind is feta cheese and kidneys. and for some reason, frog's legs, I just don't like 'em, i think b/c I have an aversion to the animal itself, all green and slimy....ew!


oh, and I once had gefillte fish at a friend's house....I don't know how I kept that down...
post #59 of 82
I've never tried to make mayonnaise, I'm assuming that tastes much better - my issue is the consistency more than anything else.

Other than that, I'm not a very picky eater!
post #60 of 82
I hate any fruit being mixed or on top of any meat.
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