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Mac and cheese

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
So for the last couple of weeks i have been on a quest for the best macaroni and cheese recipe....
I have been trying many things, but i want to keep it so simple, cheese milk butter, and maybe flour... no onions, or other flavors
what i really am experimenting with is cheese, different cheese and the amount of cheese.
What have people experienced? is there a better cheese?
right now i use a combination, but i mean brands, what brand of of what kind of cheese etc...

Hope someone has some ideas,
Thanks
post #2 of 12
You have tested with cheeses of Spanish goat?

Are my favorite...

Best regards

Susan
post #3 of 12
I wouldn't reccomend using flour because it is a flavor reducer. But if you really like a thick macaroni and cheese I guess you could use it. I tend to use sharp cheeses for a mac and cheese, no soft and lumpy stuff like ricotta (that's just me). My favorite melting cheeses are Asiago, Parmesan, Cheddar, Pepper Jack, Mozzarella, and Provolone. (Choose 3-4 of these). Why? Flavor. These cheeses are flavorful, easy to find, cheap, and delicious. Add a splash of cream or milk to it. Pretty easy stuff. I like using pre-packaged. Easier, quicker, cheaper, and less pungent.
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post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

Odd i know...

i actually find that i like the combinatioon of cheddar cheese, american, and believe it or not, velveeta.... i like the mild flavor and the smooth texture, then butter and milk....
I have tried using cheddar, expensive cheddar from the market, or deli, but i find i like the pre-shredded better. The expensive seems a bit too sharp, or tart, and not as creamy smooth

I also enjoy using gouda.... i will try the goat cheese...
post #5 of 12
Ashii's got it right in my book. I would give a lot to have a plate of my mom's mac and cheese. She always made it with Velveeta melted with milk. I think Velveeta is saltier now than it was when I was a kid, so you have to mix it with something else. When I was a kid that's the only kind of cheese we ever had. We even put it on pizza, and that's another thing I wouldn't mind having again.
post #6 of 12
Do what you please. Everyone has there own opinions for what makes the ultimate mac and cheese- some people like it mild, some like it sharp. Some like it lean, some like it fatty. Some like it "kid-friendly" and so on. What is Velveeta by the way? Some kind of Kraft cheese? :crazy:
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post #7 of 12
Velveeta is a processed cheese product made by Kraft Foods. Here it's pictured in mac and cheese.



It's very, very salty and has a high fat content, making it a good melting cheese. To my taste buds it seems artificial. As others have noted, since there are so many good, natural melting cheeses, why use this gunk? It wasn't part of my childhood food memories so it has no nostalgia for me.

I make a light roux, add half and half (or a mix of that with milk) and plenty of sharp cheddar I grate myself. I may add a bit of parmesan or fontina depending on what's in the fridge. I butter the baking dish and dust with bread crumbs, then dot the top of the mac with buttered crumbs. My favorite part is the browned, crispy stuff on the top and edges. :lips:
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post #8 of 12
Thanks for the info. Sounds awesome mezzaluma! I love baked mac and cheese! I also like fried mac and cheese as well. What do you mean a melting cheese? Something firm like provolone, mozzarella, or Manchego? *Has a billion questions about mac and cheese as well* :D
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post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Melting cheese..
Some cheese is harder, and as it is hard, when melting takes place, it can tend to curdle, or get chunky....
Melting cheese in my book, melts with a creamy consistancy even without having to add butter or milk.
And instead of using cream you can use a non fat or low fat milk without it curdling or separating into a layer of grease and the actual cheese. (notice somtimes while ytou get your pizza there is tons of cheese greese on it) oh ya... that stuff is yummy... but i dont like it in my mac and cheese

I like velveeta because of te creamy consistancy and health benifits... i like the older stuff, the new velveeta does have more salt it seems, but i just ommit the salt from the recipe...
I make sure to add some real cheddar too, gives a good flavor, but the velveeta itself does have an interesting flavor, it does taste a bit processed, but i like that about it.
post #10 of 12
I guess I fall on the side of "better cheese makes better mac & cheese". Of course it is all personal preference. I usually make a baked mac & cheese with milk tightened with a roux (flour & butter) and then I add a variety of different cheeses, according to my whims and what I have in the fridge at the moment. Right now my favorite combo is a sharp cheddar with asiago and a good amount of blue cheese, preferably gorgonzola, though the other day I made with a couple of different cheddars, including a habanero cheddar to give it some heat. I also usually like to top my baked mac & cheese with crushed Ritz crackers.
post #11 of 12
If you like experimenting with different cheeses, try fontina. It melts great and tastes awesome. Of course, this isn't very "american" but it tastes great. I also love it in grilled cheese.
post #12 of 12
I insist on chunks of ham in my Mac & Cheese. I top the dish before baking with wheat germ. Makes a great crust. I prefer to use some sharp cheddar, but I'm going to try some Gorgonzola.

..."What is Velveeta by the way?"

It's a petroleum byproduct. :D Never needs refrigeration. :eek:

As much as we (presumably) sophisticated foodies sneer at Velveeta, my Texas daughter-in-law showed us a dip made of about equal parts Velveeta and Rotel, the spicy canned crushed tomatoes. Zap it in the microwave until the Velveeta liquifies, mix well, and it makes a really great dip.

Actually, I learned to like cheese as a little kid by starting on Velveeta. It was probably the salt that made me like it. I believe it has a lot of dry powdered milk in it, so there's lots of calcium.

Mike
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